Dr Johnson's Blog

Dental Veneers for a More Youthful Smile

25 September 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners - Dental Veneers in Newton, Wellesley, Brookline, MA

Have you wanted a new job, a new love, a new image? If so, dental veneers should be on your "list of things to do". Dental veneers will change your appearance, giving you a youthful and more attractive smile. The inherent self-confidence that comes with a more appealing appearance and smile can catapult you to a new level of self-confidence which can help you reach your other goals. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, who is regarded as a "Boston's Best Prosthodontist" has been improving smiles on some of Boston's most demanding patients since 1986.

As we age, our smile begins to show the years. Dental implants can mask the effect that time has on your teeth. Fix crooked, chipped, spaced, worn or stained teeth and make your smile the best it has been in years, if not ever.

Every middle-aged adult longs for a more youthful appearance; this can be achieved by changing your smile. One way to do this is with dental veneers. Aging teeth become more opaque, worn and stained

Porcelain veneers can lengthen your teeth and bring back the natural looking appearance and shine, hiding defects or discolorations. Dental veneers are thin pieces of porcelain that adhere to the front of your teeth and change the color and shape of aging teeth.

Veneers last for a long time. But more importantly, they give you a smile that will give you the confidence to reach your goals.

For more information on a youthful smile, contact Newton Wellesely Dental Partners.


Dental Implants Replace Missing Teeth

24 September 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners - Dental Implants in Wellesley, Newton, Brookline, Boston, MA

If you are missing one or more teeth you certainly need to know your options for filling the gaps in your teeth. Gaps in your teeth cause more than dental health issues, they can also cause low self-esteem. , prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners , who is regarded as a pioneer in the synergistic use of computers in implant dentistry has been on the forefront of implant dentistry since 1989.

Dental implants are frequently the best option for replacing missing teeth and restoring smiles. Dental implants use an artificial ‘tooth root’ made from titanium, that is placed into the jaw to hold the replacement tooth. Most dentists feel that dental implants are better than traditional bridges because they don’t need the surrounding teeth for support.

Dental implants are the cosmetic restoration of choice for both aesthetics and functionality. In fact, dental implants, with proper care, will last a lifetime, giving you a natural seeming replacement for missing teeth.

Because your dental implant will look and feel like a natural tooth, you will have the self-confidence in social situation to smile naturally and generously. Your smile has a direct effect on your self-esteem. Take care of missing or gapped teeth with dental implants and restore your smile and your self-confidence. Dental implants help to maintain your teeth so that you no longer need to be ashamed of your smile.

Rather than resting on the gum line like removable dentures, or using adjacent teeth as anchors like fixed bridges, dental implants are long-term replacements. Dental implants do not slip or make embarrassing noises like dentures. Additionally, dental implants do not decay.

For more information on dental implants contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.


Root Canal Treatment: When and Why You May Need It

23 September 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MA - Root Canal Treatment

Teeth are meant to last a lifetime. Years ago, diseased or injured teeth were usually pulled. But today, a tooth can often be saved through treatment.

Newton Wellesely Dental Partners can treat diseases or injuries to the teeth or dental pulp. This often results in root canal treatment. If the dental pulp is injured:

The pulp is the soft tissue inside the tooth that contains blood vessels and nerves. When the pulp becomes inflamed or infected, treatment is needed. The most common causes of pulp inflammation or infection are a cracked or chipped tooth, a deep cavity or filling, or other serious injury to the tooth. All of these can allow bacteria to enter the pulp.

If damaged or infected pulp is not removed, the tissues around the root of the tooth can become infected. Pain and swelling often result. Even if there is no pain, bacteria can damage the bone that holds the tooth in place in the jaw. Without treatment, the tooth may have to be removed.

This often leads to root canal treatment. When a tooth is removed and not replaced, the teeth around it may shift. This can make biting and chewing difficult and may make it harder to clean your teeth.

Root canal treatment can prevent these problems by saving your natural tooth. Also, root canal treatment usually is less expensive than a replacement tooth.

For more information on root canal treatment, contact Newton Wellesely Dental Partners.


Client Highly Recommends Newton Wellesley Dental Partners

9 August 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MA

I first contacted Dr. Johnson’s office after a freak accident on a Saturday evening and reached him at a private event. Not only did he take my call, but spent 30 minutes on the phone accessing my injury. Given it was an urgent issue, he not only arranged to come into the office on the Sunday morning, he also arranged to have his staff and Dr. Shamardi join him for a 3 hour reconstruction of my front teeth which I desperately needed for my job. After I was through the initial repair work we proceeded to compete 2 implants and two crowns over the next few months. All procedures were explained thoroughly by Dr. Johnson and Dr. Shamardi before and during the procedures, including follow-up calls by the doctors. The staff were all very professional and a pleasure to deal with. The end result was a perfect smile and look better than my original teeth. If you are looking for the best dental expertise in the Boston area, I would highly recommend NWDP given my experience. The care they gave me was clearly above and beyond what I expected. Thank you Dr. Johnson, Dr. Shamardi, Peg and Diane!

- Mal Cullen


Client Happy With Her Implant Consult and Transformation

17 July 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MA

Several years ago I started on the path of implants. After having one bone graft I was told I would need more and there was no guarantee after having this additional work that implants would be successful; so I gave up. I then contacted Dr. Johnson for an implant consult because I would hear his name in ads on talk radio and would see write ups about him in magazines. Having learned that Dr. Johnson worked with celebrities and other high profile clients and how satisfied they were with his work; I felt confident he could help me. I went on to the Newton Wellesley Dental Partners website and submitted my request for a consultation.

Immediately after I hit the send request, my cell phone rang and it was Dr. Johnson himself. I was in his office within a week to begin my transformation. I was not sure of what to expect when I met him. After all he has worked on celebrities and here I was just a regular person seeking his expertise. I was pleasantly surprised at how down to earth he was as he developed the treatment plan. He wasn’t choosing an easy path but one he knew would be successful and would make us both happy. He explained every step of the process and was confident he would be able to deliver excellent results… and he did! I finished my transformation a week ago and words can’t express how happy I am now that I’m no longer self-conscious about my smile.

Dr. Johnson and his team are top notch! Knowledgeable, professional, courteous and personable. Thank you Dr. Johnson, Diane and Peg. You guys are the best!

- K. Townshend


A Great Feedback From One of Our Clients

20 June 2019


I have been a patient of Dr. Johnson's for many years. He has done multiple fillings and crowns for me over this time. He does beautiful work: you cannot tell his crowns from natural teeth. His work also lasts: I have been chewing on one of his crowns for over twenty years. This past winter, I had a swelling in my neck that my primary care physician was not taking seriously. I saw Dr. Johnson about it, to figure out if I was having a dental issue. He recognized that I had a serious medical problem, and strongly urged that I pursue diagnosis and treatment immediately. This advice helped save my life. Additionally, he provided support and medical advice throughout my diagnosis and treatment. I cannot speak more highly about Dr. Johnson and the care he gives his patients.

Susan A.


Smile Makeovers Before Your Wedding

6 June 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MA

You’re wearing an ornate white gown, your hair is in a fancy updo and you’re holding a bouquet of roses fit for a queen as you stare into your beloved’s eyes. Or or a beautifully fit tuxedo with perfectly polished shoes. It’s exactly how you both have always imagined your wedding day to be.

Then the photographer says “smile.” You panic. Your smile should not forever mar the photos of what should be the happiest day of your life – your wedding day. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been selected as Boston's "Go-To Dentist" for pre-wedding dental work. He has helped countless people (including the parents of the happy couple) achieve a naturally-radiant smile that will withstand the scrutiny of wedding photos that will be viewed for years.

From new whitening techniques to porcelain veneers and other restorative dental work, the smile of your dreams is within your reach come your wedding day.

If you think your smile will mar pictures or make you self conscious, then your wedding is the right reason to have a smile makeover.

Consider getting an initial consultation with a cosmetic dentist when you get engaged. You really want to start cosmetic dental procedures with as much time as possible to make sure it’s done right, and to give yourself time to enjoy your new smile and get used to it.

Many factors can impact the optimal outcome, including how straight the teeth are, what the condition is of the gums and whether there are existing crowns or fillings, so it’s definitely best to be evaluated well before the big event.

Regardless of what is wrong with your smile, there is likely something a cosmetic dentist can do to improve it by your wedding day, including:

White Wedding, Whiter Smile

People always want a brighter smile, so tooth whitening is popular before weddings. There are many tiers of tooth whitening available today. The darker your teeth, the more help they need. If you have significant discoloration, or discoloration on the sides of the teeth, these strips likely will not be sufficient.

The next step is usually take-home whitening trays or laser whitening. Both have advantages and disadvantages. It’s a personal preference. If your teeth are really dark and you want to whiten them quickly, laser whitening may be your best option. Laser whitening is often the choice for people who don’t like the idea of wearing mouth trays.

Take home trays are more expensive than laser whitening and take more time (but) you may get deeper whitening because you are bathing your teeth in whitening gel for a longer time.

Restorative Dental Work Before the Wedding

Like options for whitening teeth, there are also several routes a person can take to restore broken, chipped, cracked or stained teeth.

Dental Bonding is typically the first line. Bonding can improve the appearance of teeth that are chipped, broken, cracked, stained or have spaces between them. With bonding, tooth-colored materials are applied, or bonded, to the tooth surface. The small spaces are usually filled with cosmetic white bonding. This can close space and it is a simple, non-invasive and conservative procedure.

Dental Veneers are another popular choice for brides and grooms. These thin, custom-made shells cover the front side of teeth, and can be used to treat spaces between teeth and teeth that are chipped or worn, permanently stained, poorly shaped or slightly crooked.

Crowns may be needed if porcelain veneers won’t do the trick. A crown is a tooth-shaped “cap” that is placed over a tooth. Crowns can restore a tooth’s shape, size and strength and/or improve its appearance. Crowns cover the visible portion of a tooth that lies at and above the gum line.

Cosmetic Tooth Contouring Before the Wedding

Cosmetic dentists can correct minor defects in the shape and appearance of a tooth through a process referred to as tooth contouring or tooth reshaping.

This is sort of like filing your nails. If one tooth is longer or pointed or has a chip that needs to be smoothed out, then with a little cosmetic contouring teeth can look pretty, without the need for full braces or a crown. It’s not painful either. It’s pretty much like when you are doing your fingernails, you know something is being done, but it doesn’t hurt.

Regardless of what procedure you choose, make sure your dentist is skilled in cosmetic dentistry.

Continuing education assures that the chosen dentist is up-to-date on the latest techniques and materials in cosmetic dentistry. Questions to ask include does the dentist attend continuing education courses regularly. Also ask if the dentist passed a credentialing examination to become accredited by a group such as the AACD.

For more information on getting the perfect wedding smile, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Source: yourdentistryguide.com


Professional Teeth Whitening For Your Wedding, Graduation, or other Summer Events

14 May 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MA

Now that summer is here, you want to look your best. Summer weddings, Graduations, and get-togethers are incentives to find a way to improve our appearance and our confidence. Teeth whitening is a fast, easy and effective way to improve your smile and take years off your appearance. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners was an early pioneer in dental whitening and has lectured throughout the country on techniques to enhance a smile.

Many people choose over the counter teeth whiteners because they think that this is easier than in-office teeth whitening. With all the whitening products available over-the-counter, such as toothpastes, mouthwashes, and related products it can be confusing. But, all have similar complaints: from blisters, to skin peeling inside the mouth, and permanent taste-bud damage. Store-bought whiteners do not use custom trays which leaves the chemicals in the products to irritate your mouth and gums.

Not everyone is a candidate for teeth whitening, which means that over-the-counter whitening products can leave your teeth looking worse. Fillings and dental reconstructions can stain, but can’t be whitened or brightened which means you may end up with teeth that are darker than the rest.

In-office teeth whiteners are convenient, fast and the procedure is performed by a dental professional in a safe environment for better, longer-lasting results. In-office teeth whitening procedures have the best, longest lasting results and can whiten teeth up to 9 shades.

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners gives you a bright, natural looking, white smile just in time for summer events. Find out if teeth whitening is the right option for you by consulting us first. To schedule a consultation, contact us today.


Invisible Dental Care Options For a Perfect Wedding Smile

29 April 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners – Weston, Brookline, Newton, MA

Summer is wedding season. If you are a soon-to-be bride or groom now is the time to have dental work done before the big day. You don’t want to be disappointed in your wedding photos. Before your wedding day there are invisible and effective dental procedures that can be done to improve your smile in just a few visits. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been recognized by 'Boston Magazine' as the "Go-To" dentist for pre-wedding dental enhancements.

He has treated countless brides, grooms and parents of the wedding party in order to prepare that perfect smile. Here is a recent review posted by one such groom-to-be, "I can't speak highly enough of the incredible work that Dr. Johnson and his staff performed to improve my smile prior to an upcoming wedding. The whole process from start to finish was painless and stress-free. I wish I had had this done years ago. As a prosthodontist, it's not enough to be a great dentist, you have to be a great artist too, and Dr. Johnson is one of the best. My thanks to him, Peg and Dianne for creating a very positive experience and a wonderful outcome; one that I will see every time we look at our wedding photos". - Scott M.

With so many invisible dental solutions you can be sure your wedding photos will be perfect.

In-office teeth whitening is the fastest, most effective way to a natural, white smile. In-office whitening ensures that teeth are natural looking. Over the counter teeth whitening products are not nearly as effective, fast-acting or long-lasting and won’t give you the smile you want for your big day.

If you have chipped teeth, spaced teeth, misshaped teeth or discolored caps or crowns then dental veneers are another invisible dental solution. Veneers create a beautiful white smile for your wedding day and beyond. These thin porcelain veneers adhere to the front of your teeth and, with proper care, can last a lifetime. They are used to elongate and brighten teeth and to make teeth more uniform for a beautiful wedding smile.

For your big day, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners for more information on invisible cosmetic dental procedures for your big day.


Dentures to Replace Missing Teeth

25 April 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MA

Dentures are removable replacements for . There are two types of dentures: complete and partial dentures. When all the teeth are missing, complete dentures are used. When only some teeth are missing, partial dentures are used. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been recognized for the artistry and functional excellence in his bespoke dentures.

Complete Dentures vs Immediate Dentures:

Complete dentures can be either "conventional" or "immediate." Generally, well-crafted dentures take a few weeks to fabricate and require several visits for impressions and try-ins. Many offices can make 'quickie' dentures but they cannot and do not offer quaity aesthetics or a great fit.

can be positioned as soon as the teeth are removed. One of the benefits of immediate dentures is that the patient is never without teeth during the healing period. However, there may be a disadvantage too. Bones and gums shrink especially during the healing period following tooth removal. Therefore, immediate dentures may require more adjustments during the healing process and are generally only a temporary solution until the conventional dentures are placed.

Partial Dentures

A partial denture is also known as a dental bridge or fixed bridge. Partial dentures are used when one or more natural teeth remain. A fixed bridge replaces one or more teeth by placing crowns on the teeth on either side of the space and attaching artificial teeth to them. The bridge is cemented into place.

A partial denture fills in the space caused by missing teeth and prevents other teeth from changing position.

A precision partial denture is removable. Often these are more natural-looking appliances.

For more information on Dentures, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.


Dietary Supplements, Medications, and Dental Health

16 April 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MA

Because nearly 70% of prescription drug users do not discuss their dietary supplement use with their dentists, clinicians must be proactive in questioning patients about their use of these agents. A complete and accurate pharmacological history will help your dentist avoid potential interactions between dietary supplements and drugs.

Believe it or not there are drug interactions between popular dietary supplements and medications used commonly in dentistry.

Provided that patients are not taking ginkgo, St. John’s wort, evening primrose or valerian, oral health care providers can prescribe or administer any of the medications used commonly in dentistry without concern about possible dietary supplement–drug interactions.

According to the evidence, acetaminophen is perhaps the best analgesic choice for patients who use or may use dietary supplements because it is not associated with any clinically significant dietary supplement–drug interactions, in contrast to other analgesics evaluated.

Amoxicillin, cephalexin, metronidazole and penicillin are considered the best antibiotic choices for users of dietary supplements.

Practical Implications. Recognition and avoidance of potential interactions between dietary supplements and drugs will help your dentist optimize treatment while emphasizing patients’ safety.

Always talk to your dentist or doctor about the medications or dietary supplements you are taking. For more information, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Source: JADA


Cosmetic Dentistry for Health Reasons

27 March 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MA

More than 9 in 10 Americans say a smile is the most important social asset, and three quarters of them say an unattractive smile would hurt a person's career chances.

But only half of adults polled by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry say they are happy with their own smiles. As a society, we are very smile conscious.

While some may turn to cosmetic dentistry solely for aesthetic purposes, Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodotnist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners says, "it also can improve dental health".

"A person with malocclusion, or misalignment of teeth, who opts for cosmetic dentistry will likely end up with a prettier smile. But straighter teeth also will be easier to clean, potentially leading to better oral health. There also can be a self-esteem boost that comes with having an improved smile. There are instances when cosmetic dentistry is not strictly cosmetic. There's a place for it."

A dentist should ask patients why they want cosmetic dentistry and what they want to achieve with improvements to their smile, then proceeds from there to decide what procedure might be best for that patient.There are different reasons to choose it. If it's just the shade of their teeth that patients are concerned about, then maybe bleaching is enough. If the patient has very good teeth intact and wants to even them out, maybe veneers are the way to go.

If the dentist suggests cosmetic dentistry, patients can ask several questions to help them decide what is best for them:

  • What is your reasoning for it?
  • Why do you believe I need it?
  • Is it strictly cosmetic or are there health benefits for me?
  • What are risks and benefits of it?

If patients are not satisfied with the answers, they should seek second opinions. For more information, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.


Oral Care and Osteoporosis

18 March 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MA

If you are currently an osteoporosis patient, it is critical that you maintain perfect and regular care of your teeth. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners wants you to know that, "if you are about to enter into treatment for osteoporosis, it is critical that you have a thorough evaluation of your dental health and have all the treatment done prior to receiving any osteoporosis IV or oral medication".

Bone is constantly being broken down and then built up again. Osteoporosis medications interfere with the breaking down of bone, thus slowing down the bone-loss process. This can affect your teeth and jaw.

Bisphosphonates have caused serious bone healing issues, so it is imperative that you inform your dentist if on any of these medications. If you have taken or are currently taking any medicine for osteoporosis and have dental treatment coming up, you may want to submit for a simple test to see if you can safely be treated.

Oral health maintenance is important in patients with osteoporosis. Bisphosphonate therapy or other medical treatment for these people should be discontinued only after consultation with your physician. Dental care for patients with osteoporosis and other health conditions is important in order to maintain your overall health.

Dentists can also help in the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Orally, early warning signs of osteoporosis may include more severe gum disease, bone loss around teeth, tooth loss, dentures becoming loose, or ill-fitting dentures. Based on the findings in the patient's medical history, clinical exam, and x-rays, dentist can refer at risk candidates for further bone mineral density testing. Many new studies suggest that dentist have sufficient clinical and radiographic information that enables them to play a significant role in early diagnosis and screening of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women.

For more information contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Source: Excerpts – Dentalcare.com


Family Dentistry and Preventive Dental Care

6 March 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MA

Keep Your Teeth Healthy!

If you take good care of your teeth, you will be able to keep them your whole life. At Newton Wellesley Dental Partners we want you to get the most out of your office visits and help keep your smile beautiful. Part of good care is getting routine cleanings and check-ups.

When you come in for your visit you can expect:

  • Teeth Cleaning – complete removal of plaque and tartar, polishing / stain removal
  • Low Radiation X Rays – Digital imaging that use at least 50% less radiation than traditional lead films. These enable detection of cavities that you may not see or feel and help screen for bone loss (periodontitis)
  • Check for decay and evaluate condition of existing fillings and crowns
  • Inspect gums for gingivitis (gum disease) or periodontitis (gum disease that affects the bone)
  • Oral Cancer Screen – Much like a dermatologist would look at your skin, we check the sides of your tongue, floor of the mouth, throat, and border of the lips for lesions

After your visit, we will be happy to discuss any questions you may have and provide options to address your concerns. At Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, we believe in educating and empowering our patients to make informed decisions about their oral health. Contact us.


Most Popular Cosmetic Dentistry Procedures

25 February 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners - Cosmetic Dentistry in Brookline, Newton, Wellesley, MA

Do you know how important an attractive smile can be to someone's self-esteem? If you suffer with a ‘less-than-perfect-smile” then you know that a great smile is directly related to self-confidence, self-esteem and other’s perception of you. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Most cosmetic dentistry patients in his practice of 32 years are 40-60 years old.

While there are several cosmetic dentistry treatments available today that are more available to the general population, it is important to make an educated decision about the procedure and the dentist you choose.

For those who have unattractive teeth, or who have teeth they are unhappy with, here are some popular cosmetic dentistry procedures:

Teeth whitening is the most popular cosmetic dentistry procedure. Patients with moderate to severe discoloration should use professional teeth whitening to assure an even white tone without over-bleaching. This typically takes no more than an hour per visit.

The second-most popular cosmetic dentistry procedure is dental veneers. These thin layers, frequently made of porcelain, are placed over teeth to correct problems such as discoloration and gaps all at one time. Veneers can last seven to 20 years with proper care.

are not only cosmetic, but functional. To replace missing or badly damaged teeth, a titanium screw (implant) is inserted into the jawbone, and a false tooth (crown) is put on top. This false tooth looks and feels just like a real tooth.

Teeth make a difference in first impressions. A study showed that the more than 5,000 single men and women surveyed said they judge a potential partner on their teeth most upon first meeting them. Teeth were higher than clothing and hair and all other factors.

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners offers cosmetic dentistry services and general dentistry such as teeth cleanings, X-rays, fillings, extractions, root canals, crowns, teeth whitening and veneers. However, as a prosthodontist, Dr. Johnson, considered a pioneer in the synergistic use of computers in dental treatment, is also is an expert in more advanced implant dentistry, facelift dentures, and bone grafting sinus lifts. Contact us.


Questions to Ask A Cosmetic Dentist

18 February 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners - Cosmetic Dentist in Newton, Wellesley, Brookline, MA

You may be looking for the perfect cosmetic dentist who will create a beautiful smile for you. But you need to ask a lot of questions before you can be sure. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, has been a pioneer in the development of techniques to maximize the outcome of procedures to enhance one's smile.

Cosmetic dentistry is dental work that will aesthetically enhance your teeth. While most people see a cosmetic dentist for aesthetics, a good cosmetic dentist will also focus on the functionality part. Combining aesthetics with perfect functionality is the most important thing when it comes to getting those dental veneers, crowns, bridgework or implants.

You can enlist a cosmetic dentist for: dental crowns, dental veneers, dental implants, teeth whitening, or anything related to orthodontics. Someone who sees demanding patients and has a stellar reputation is often your best best to assure a naturally radiant result.

What do you need to know about the cosmetic dentist you choose:

* Experience. Ask your cosmetic dentist how long has he been practicing. There are many general dentists who will offer a few cosmetic dentistry procedures, but it is import to know if they have the experience. Is your cosmetic dentist board certified and licensed. The ADA (American Dental Association) offers the board certification, while licensing is offered by the state. If he is a licensed professional, it means that he has passed regularly all state and national examinations. Choosing a prosthodontist (a specialist recognized by the ADA) generally assures one a more-experienced provider.

*What are the main types of cosmetic dentistry procedures your dentist is qualified to offer? A general dentist is required to graduate from an accredited dental school. Whereas a prosthodontist receives either 2 or 3 years of clinical training in addition to his dental school degree. This added focus and training usually means that a prosthodontist has greater passion and expertise to do implants, veneers, dental reconstructions, etc. For your particular situation, ask the dentist what treatment he would recommend and why. Also, ask about the pros and cons of each dental treatment in your case. What are the possible risks and complications with the type of cosmetic dentistry you have chosen?

Ask for examples of past work or to speak with other patients who have undergone similar work. A good cosmetic dentist can show you before and after pictures as well as testimonials and/or put you in touch with other patients.

For more information or to make an appointment, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

World Dental


Choosing a Prosthodontist

12 February 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners - Prosthodontist in Newton, Wellesley, Boston, MA

Prosthodontics is one of nine dental specialties recognized by the American Dental Association and focuses on aesthetic restoration and replacement of teeth, including procedures such as: dental veneers, crowns, bridgework, ceramic fillings and dental implants. Specialization in prosthodontics requires an additional two to three years of training after dental school (above that of a general dentist) through a hospital- or university-based program accredited by the ADA. Dr. Ryne Johnson, considered by many to be Boston's best prosthodontist, is the director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners and has been in private practice since 1986.

Today’s advanced technology in dental options and prosthodontic procedures can produce dramatic results in a short amount of time. A state-of-the-art facility and dental team can make the difference in proper care. Dr. Johnson is considered a pioneer in the synergistic use of computer technology in the diagnosis, treatment planning and implementation of implants in complex prosthodontic reconstructions.

Quality prosthodontics requires a dedicated and experienced staff. Prosthodontists require knowledge in various fields of aesthetic, restorative, and implant dentistry, which is why you should seek the skill and reputation of a specialist to handle your demanding dental needs.

In order to achieve the best results, look for a prosthodontist who has specific experience within the restorative field of dentistry. Choosing the right practice can offer patients greater confidence and overall dental health. When choosing a prosthodontist it is important for patients to look for someone who has a stellar reputation in a community for many years; with a great deal of experience and extensive training.

For more information on the best prosthodontist in your area, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

cosmeticdentistsnews.com


Dental Treatments Improve Personal and Professional Lives

7 February 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners - Dental Treatments in Newton, Brookline, Weston, MA

Studies have been conducted that focus on adults who have completed recent dental treatment. The results show that adult cosmetic dental treatment contribute to significant improvements in both personal and professional lives. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, considered by many to be Boston's best prosthodontist, "many corporate executives are updating their dental work to project a better, more-youthful smile. In a recent article in GQ, I outlined that in a busy, competitive business culture, a beautiful smile often influences one's professional trajectory".

75% of those surveyed attributed their improved personal or career relationships to newfound self-confidence and their new smile. 92% of the respondents would suggest dental treatment to others. Before treatment patients were concerns with questions such as “Am I too old?”, “How will I look?” and “What will others think?” However, after their dental treatment, an overwhelming majority no longer had such concerns.

This shows that a healthy, beautiful smile can be a critical factor when it comes to personal and professional success. Adults are seeking treatment in record numbers and anyone, at any age, should consult a prosthodontist to learn if they could benefit from treatment. It’s never too late to have healthy teeth and that 'winning' smile.

For more information, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

SBWire


Cosmetic Dentistry Improves Self-Confidence

31 January 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners - Cosmetic Dentistry in Brookline, Newton, Wellesley, MA

The results of a survey conducted by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry showed that virtually all Americans -- 99.7% to be exact -- believe that a nice looking smile is an important physical asset. As a director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners and whom many have called "Boston's Best Prosthodontist, Dr. Ryne Johnson sees countless patients who don't like the way their teeth look and are eager to improve their smiles through cosmetic dentistry. According to Dr. Johnson, "There is an extensive selection of cosmetic solutions for patients who utilizes the latest dental technologies and methods".

Self-confidence is serious business. Only 4% of all women worldwide think that they are beautiful and six out of 10 girls stop doing the things they love when they aren't happy about their looks. It's not surprising that the majority of patients seeking cosmetic dental treatments are women. But it's not just women -- a research study found that more than four in five men use language that shows they have anxiety about their appearance.

The modern treatments that Newton Wellesley Dental Partners offers often helps improve self-confidence in patients when it comes to their smiles. Some of his procedures include teeth whitening, porcelain veneers, dental implants, and fixed or removable bridges and crowns that can last for many years with good care.

In-office teeth whitening is a popular cosmetic service that patients often request. A high grade whitening gel is applied on the teeth with custom trays. The entire process takes about an hour and leaves patients with very desirable results that can last for two years or more. The length of time that the teeth stay white depends on each patient's commitment to regular care and maintenance.

You can often achieve fast and efficient solutions to aesthetic issues with cosmetic dentistry. Cosmetic options have improved significantly over the past couple of decades. Patients can now have straight, nicely aligned white teeth faster than ever before. For the first time in a long time, you can feel confident about smiling.

For more information, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Source: News Medical


Invisible Fillings are a Popular Cosmetic Treatment that are Stronger and Look Natural

22 January 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Wellesley, Brookline, MA

More and more focus is being put on our smiles. After all, your smile is everyone’s first impression of you. In fact, today, more money is being spent on cosmetic dental treatments than any other cosmetic procedure; thus, the popularity of invisible fillings made either of a composite resin or ceramic material. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, has been called Boston's Best Prosthodontist and has been on the forefront of development in the field of cosmetic dentistry.

People don’t like the way metal fillings look, especially if they have a mouth full of them. Now, with invisible fillings no one needs to see a mouth full of silver anymore. No longer do you have to be self-conscious because of a ‘silver-filled’ smile.

Invisible fillings have been around in cosmetic dentistry for 20+ years but material science advancements in the past 5 years have made them even better. If you need a dental filling, now you can hide it completely! Made for their aesthetic effect, the most important thing to know about them beyond the fact that they cannot be seen, even by you, is that they work. Invisible fillings seal the gap or decay in your tooth better than standard metal fillings. Now, your dental fillings will be stronger, less likely to break down, and invisible. Silver amalgam fillings can cause future cracks in your teeth, composite or ceramic fillings won’t.

Invisible fillings have a natural look and feel and are made for longevity. These bonded restorations are perfect for small to medium sized cavities, in fact, they are actually the filling material of choice for most dentists. They “bond” with your teeth and they come in multiple tooth-colored shades so they will match your natural teeth.

To seal your cavity better than silver fillings choose invisible fillings...either a composite resin or even better, a ceramic filling. This allows them to be stronger and less likely to decay or break down. Contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners for natural look and feel to your dentistry.


Toothaches and Sensitivity: How Winter Weather Can Cause this Discomfort

15 January 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MA

Do your teeth ever hurt when you eat something hot or cold? When tooth enamel wears down or the gums recede, it exposes a layer of your teeth that is very sensitive to temperature changes. If something too hot or too cold touches this part of your mouth, you’ll feel some pain.

But you aren’t just at risk for this type of discomfort because of your diet. During the winter, your teeth contract in response to intense cold weather. This can lead to cracks in your teeth and cause the same type of pain that you experience when you bite into ice cream. Take a look at how the cold can affect your teeth, how this relates to winter weather, and what you can do to fix aches and sensitive teeth or nerves.

Can Cold Weather Make My Teeth Hurt?

This layer below the enamel is called dentin. It’s the “core” of your teeth, with the enamel covering the top of this layer and the gums covering the bottom portion. Unfortunately, the dentin is covered in nerve fibers. Therefore, any problems with your enamel or gums, such as periodontal disease could leave you vulnerable to cold weather pain.

Weather sensitivity can occur regardless of how well you care for your teeth, but you’re at greater risk if you don’t practice good oral hygiene and live in an area that has extreme temperature swings. To minimize sensitivity, you should learn about the common causes for sensitive teeth and what you should do when you notice pain because of the cold weather.

Common Culprits Responsible for Seasonally Sensitive Teeth

Your dentin could be exposed for a number of reasons. People often wear down their enamel or suffer from receding gums and tooth sensitivity because of one of the following reasons:

  • Periodontal disease: Diseases of the gums, cementum, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone can expose the dentin and cause sensitivity. Gingivitis is one of the earliest stages of periodontal disease.
  • Brushing too vigorously: You may think that you need to bear down hard to remove surface stains, but brushing with too much force can start to wear down your enamel.
  • Clenching and grinding: Some people may clench or grind their teeth in their sleep. This can wear down tooth enamel and lead to sensitivity.
  • Tooth decay: Sensitivity to cold is an early sign of an undetected tooth decay problem. If you start to experience tooth pain, go see a dentist.
  • Tooth whitening agents: Have you started using a new tooth-whitening agent? The ingredients that make your teeth whiter may strip past surface stains and start wearing down your enamel. If the agent starts hurting your teeth, stop the treatment and consult with your dentist.
  • Acidic beverages: Sodas, coffee, tea, and other drinks with a high concentration of acid, such as juices, can erode your teeth and expose the dentin layer.
  • Other lifestyle habits: Other bad oral health habits, such as using tobacco products or not brushing or flossing properly, can cause your gums to recede. When this happens, the dentin at the base of the gums is exposed and can lead to temperature-sensitive teeth.

Try These Fixes for Your Sensitive Teeth

If you’re experiencing sensitivity, a dentist may recommend one of these fixes for your sensitive teeth:

  • A fluoride application: Fluoride is a natural mineral that a dentist can apply to your sensitive teeth. This application strengthens the enamel and thus prevents sensitivity because of exposed dentin.
  • Covering root surfaces: A dentist can apply a sealant to fix problems with receding gums.
  • Making a mouth guard: If you clench or grind your teeth, a dentist can make a mouth guard to prevent you from damaging your teeth in your sleep. This can help with jaw pain as well.
  • Root canal treatment: During a root canal procedure, the dentist removes the soft pulp inside the damaged tooth. This is recommended to fix issues with deep decay or a cracked or chipped tooth.

When to See a Dentist

You should see a dentist whenever you experience tooth sensitivity. This is also necessary if you need a more complex solution, such as a mouth guard. A dentist can also determine exactly which teeth are exposed to sensitivity and recommend an appropriate treatment or prescribe a special toothpaste or similar product. Finally, if your teeth are especially sensitive, a dentist can schedule a root canal, filling, or other advanced procedure.

Whether you’re just starting to struggle with sensitivity or always have issues in the cold weather, it’s worth visiting your dentist and finding a solution to resolve your pain.

For more information, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Source: 123dentist.com


Dental Health New Year's Resolutions for Busy Adults

10 January 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, M

As an adult healthy teeth and a healthy smile are important. It is important that, with your busy lifestyle, you don’t let your dental care slip. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has some dental health resolutions for busy adults.

Don’t let dental visits slide!

Adult life can sometimes be a juggling act and it may feel like you just can't find the time for a dental visit. But making time for regular dental visits, especially with a skilled hygienist, now can help keep you out of the dental office in the future.

Brush and floss daily, even if it’s late.

You've heard this a million times by now, but the importance of regular brushing and flossing can never be emphasized enough. Even if you've been good about your oral hygiene all your life, resist the temptation to let it slide for even one day; the longer plaque stays on your teeth, the more destructive it becomes.

Eat well-balanced meals.

When you're juggling work, home and kids, it can be tempting to turn to fast food, soda and sugary snacks as a way to save time and feel more energetic. But sugar is a tooth decay demon and can cause you to crash after that initial "sugar high." Be sure to integrate plenty of fresh vegetables into your daily meals and eat fruit, nuts and celery or carrot sticks as snacks.

Exercise regularly -- it's good for your teeth!

Studies show that people who maintain a healthy lifestyle -- exercise and eating right -- are 40 percent less likely to develop advanced gum disease.

Consider treating yourself to cosmetic dentistry

Whether you want a quick boost or a complete smile makeover, there are plenty of cosmetic dental treatments available to help you achieve your dream smile. One-hour, in-office, teeth whitening treatments can make your teeth 8-10 shades whiter, and porcelain veneers can mask stained teeth, chipped teeth or crooked teeth.

For more information or for a dental appointment, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.


Choosing a New Dentist

2 January 2019

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MAThere are many reasons for looking for a new dentist. Relocation, your dentist may have retired, you may have a dental issue you need addresses, want to see a specialist for some complex therapy, or maybe you want a second opinion. Whatever the reason, most rely on recommendations from friends and family and now more and more people are relying on reviews. But family and friends may have different needs than your family. Perhaps you have dental issues and need more than the standard twice yearly dental check-ups.

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners wants you to know that, "There are different things you should keep in mind when choosing a new dentist in the Boston area".

Experience:

How long has the dentist practiced? New technologies and slick advertising may imply that seeing a new dentist is warranted but experience matters! New dentists generally do not have the 'frame of reference" that years in practice can offer.

Reputation:

It matters! The changes in practice management have created large groups with considerable turn over. But what about quality of the work? What about longevity of the work? Do you know what the expected outcome will be with someone without a stellar reputation?

Expertise:

Does the dentist use the latest technology? Work with the best materials? Work with the best dental laboratories for aesthetic work? One's expertise directly influences the quality of your work. Most advanced and high-tech dentistry is not taught school. You need to be sure that your new dentist is up-to-date and qualified to perform newly innovated dental procedures and maintains continuing education.

Location:

Nearby home, work or school might make keeping appointments easier.

Special needs:

Understand the needs of your family. This could include the need for cosmetic work, a dentist that offers sedation dentistry, or one who takes your particular dental insurance.

When looking for a new dentist, ask these questions:

  • Is the dentist accepting new patients?
  • How long has the dentist been practicing?
  • Does the dentist treat patients with special conditions?
  • Is the dentist a pediatric dentist?
  • How long is the wait for an appointment?
  • Do they have the latest dental technology?
  • Does the dentist take continuing education courses and stay up to date with the latest dental technology and techniques?

Regardless of why you are searching for a new dentist, asking family, staying informed and asking the right questions will help you find the right dentist for your family.

For more information, contact us or to see Dr. Johnson's bio.


Before You Whiten Teeth, Talk to Your Dentist

28 December 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MAThere are many over-the-counter teeth whitening products available to you. But, you may not get the results you are looking for when you use store-bought whitening products. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, has been performing teeth lightening procedures for his patients since 1986 and has lectured nationally on the topic.

All promise a dazzling smile and whiter teeth, and some of them work well. However, when you opt for over-the-counter teeth whitening products, you don’t get your dentist’s education, training, and experience. And you actually need this before you whiten your teeth. You’ll save money when you choose over-the-counter tooth-whitening products instead of in-office teeth whitening, but, often, you get what you pay for. Think... Tylenol vs a stronger, prescription pain killer.

Even if you want to try to whiten your teeth at home, American Dental Association experts recommend that you see your dentist first. This is because you want to rule out dental problems such as periodontal (gum) disease and cavities before you use store bought teeth whiteners. Whitening your teeth can aggravate those problems.

Also, previous teeth restorations like crowns and fillings won’t whiten along with their natural teeth. Tooth whiteners do not work as well on antibiotic-stained teeth either. And they do not correct all discoloration. Yellow and brown teeth respond better to bleaching than gray teeth.

Another advantage of scheduling a visit with your dentist before you whiten your teeth is that the dentist can explain all your options and educate you on the advantages and disadvantages of each method. There are basically, three approaches: over the counter, high-intensity prescriptions and in-office options. If you choose to whiten your teeth by yourself, your dentist can recommend the best product for you. They can also explain what they can do for you. Over-the-counter products are not custom-fit for your mouth. In-office teeth whitening uses custom trays that fit perfectly in your mouth; and you can use them at home. In-office teeth whitening also uses stronger bleaching agents than you would get from a store bought product.

For more information on teeth whitening, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

oralhealth.deltadental.com


Happy Holidays from Newton Wellesley Dental Partners

20 December 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MAOur warmest Holiday wishes from the entire team here at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. Calendar year 2018 was, and continues to be, a truly remarkable year and we take this moment to recognize the joy that each and every one of you has brought to our personal and professional lives. We exist because of your faith and trust in us.

As calendar year 2019 approaches, we reflect upon the foundational recognition that "your success is our success". Our New Year’s wish for 2019 is to nurture our positive and ever strengthening relationship and to deliver increasing value to you and your family through the entirety of 2019.

Throughout this Holiday season may you be blessed with health and surrounded by friends and family. All the best! Cheers!


Get Rid of Discolored Dental Fillings for Newer, Lighter Options

11 December 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MAStill flashing a bit of silver when you smile? Cavities can happen to anyone, but the whole world doesn't have to know about them! According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, "If you've been living with old, discolored fillings, there's never been a better time to have them replaced."

Find out how new fillings can benefit more than your looks, and about all the options that are now available by visiting Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Why Replace Fillings?

The cosmetic reasons for replacing amalgam (often referred to as "silver") fillings may be obvious — your smile looks better without the telltale dark spots and any associated feeling of self-consciousness goes away.

What many people don't realize, however, is that there are also health reasons for getting new fillings. While it can be easy to forget about cavities once they're filled, the truth is that oral health threats can re-emerge as fillings weaken over time and leakage unchecked can lead to a need for a root canal procedure or crowns. Constant grinding and chewing will wear down any filling, and it often only takes one particularly hard or sticky food to dislodge or crack it.

Once the protective barrier to a cavity has been lost or broken, harmful bacteria can easily seep in and continue to eat away at the tooth. In many cases — especially those where the seal has been damaged but has not completely fallen out — tooth decay under or around the filling may easily escape notice until it reaches the point where a root canal or an extraction is necessary. Being diligent about dental visits and proactive about replacing fillings can help you avoid the unnecessary pain and expense of a tooth infection.

Replacement Options?

The good news about getting rid of old fillings is that amalgam is no longer your only choice. As hardy and durable as this traditional mixture of silver, mercury and other metal alloys is, it has become virtually obsolete due to more discrete options such as: Ceramic Inlays or Onlays: custom ceramic fillings used to replace larger fillings in molars using CAD/CAM technology

  • Composite Fillings: tooth-colored bondings primarily used for the front teeth
  • Veneers: thin, porcelain, non-staining shells affixed to the front surface of teeth
  • Crowns: complete covering for damaged teeth that a filling alone cannot repair

Your dentist may recommend one particular treatment or a varied approach, depending on the number and type of fillings needed. Rest assured, however, that the choices at your disposal lend themselves to a more natural look than that of an amalgam filling.

Caring for Teeth with Fillings

Regardless of which replacement option you choose, a little extra care and attention can go a long way in protecting your investment. To extend the life of a newly restored tooth, consider making these changes to your everyday routine:

  • Brush and floss regularly to keep the tooth's surface clear of tough buildup
  • Use a mouth guard at night to avoid unnecessary pressure if tooth grinding is a habit
  • Steer clear of overly hard or sticky foods that can damage the restored tooth
  • See a dentist if you notice a bad taste or dull pain that can indicate a defect or decay

Regular dentist visits can further minimize the risk of damaged filings — and help prevent the need for new ones. For questions about replacing and/or maintaining fillings, schedule an appointment with your dentist.

lh360/mayoclinic.org


Teeth Trauma: It's Sensitive

5 December 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MAYou're not imagining it. That sudden twinge of pain in one or more of your teeth can, in fact, be caused by something as simple as a blast of wind, a bite of something fresh from the oven, or (what was supposed to be) a cool, refreshing treat. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has seen the entire range of dental sensitivities over his 32 years of practice.

Some will pass and others are a symptom of a more significant issue.You may have sensitive teeth, and if so, the problem could be here to stay. What does this mean and what can you do about it? It depends on a number of things.

How to Tell if You Have Sensitive Teeth

First, you should determine whether the pain is truly due to tooth sensitivity, or something else entirely. A trip to the dentist will let you know for sure, but here are some things you can do to see if sensitivity is most likely to blame:

1. Take recent dental work into consideration: cleanings or invasive procedures can aggravate the teeth and gums, and result in temporary discomfort that should go away in a short period of time.

2. Check your teeth for new cavities: if the area where you experienced pain can easily be examined, grab a mirror and scan the section for visible holes or pits that could indicate an untreated cavity that may be the source of the problem.

3. Make sure existing fillings are intact: inspect prior work for any cracks, or fillings partially or completely removed. A deeper filling that has been damaged may cause nerve irritation and result in more noticeable pain.

4. Check your gums for recession: if you notice that your gums are receding this could be contributing to you sensitivity. When the porous root surface of a tooth is exposed it is more susceptible to temperature and air.

5. Assess your daily habits: if you notice that your gums are receding, this could be contributing to your sensitivity. When the porous root surface of a tooth is exposed, it is more susceptible to temperature and air.

Ways to Ease the Pain

If tooth sensitivity is ultimately the problem, there are plenty of things you can do to help manage it. Minimize your discomfort by making these changes:

  • Limit intake of acidic foods and beverages, such as citrus fruits and sodas
  • Switch to a soft-bristled toothbrush, and apply less pressure when brushing
  • Quit using over-the-counter mouthwash; ask your dentist for a more neutral rinse
  • Try toothpastes made for sensitive teeth, and see which option works best for you
  • Use a mouth guard at night if you have a habit of grinding your teeth
  • Brush and floss regularly to keep enamel-eroding plaque at bay
  • Switch to an electric toothbrush, which is more gentle on your gums

Get Help from Your Dentist

See your dentist regularly to stay on top of the issue. Regular, professional cleanings and examinations will go a long way in keeping the problem from getting worse.

Certain in-office treatments may further ease your pain, such as:

  • Fluoride varnishes: An application that strengthens and protects exposed enamel
  • Fluoride foam/gel trays: An immersion of teeth in a concentrated dose of fluoride
  • Sealants: A bonding material acts as a barrier and seals off the dentin of your teeth

If you've modified your habits, but still experience major discomfort after a period of time, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners to see whether these options are right for you.

LH360


Dental Advances You'll Appreciate

27 November 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MAHave you stepped inside a dentist's office lately? According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, considered by many as Boston's Best Prosthodontist, "What you find might surprise you. It's not just the high tech gadgets. Serious advances have made examinations and treatments more accurate, efficient and less painful than what you may recall".

From digital scans to digital production of your tooth replacement, cutting edge technology is transforming dental care — and your oral health stands to benefit.

Traditional Procedures Get Digitized

More and more dentists are embracing digital X-rays compared to film-based radiographs, and it's easy to understand why: reduced radiation levels up to 90%, images rendered almost immediately, and computer viewing and storage help dentists make diagnoses and comparisons in a matter of clicks.

The cavity search with a steel hook that typically follows X-rays now has a high-tech alternative as well. Dentists are starting to use "diode" lasers instead, which are far more accurate and much less uncomfortable. Cavity detection happens in a series of sweeps, and won't leave you in agony.

Materials are of Much Higher Quality

Once your treatment plan is under way, you'll soon come to find that even the materials being used are of much higher quality. Dental implants previously known for high failure rates are now straightforward and long lasting, involving a titanium screw that gets inserted into the jaw. Dental Veneers feel more seamless thanks to an improved shell that requires less reshaping, and they are thinner, yet sturdy. And repairs to cracked or broken teeth look more natural due to better bonding solutions and techniques.

Through the use of computer-assisted design and manufacture technology (respectively known as "CAD" and "CAM"), ceramic dentistry can now be created using milling machines and digital printing.

Cosmetic Work Gets a Natural Makeover

Perhaps some of the more noticeable transformations have occurred in the cosmetic field of work. New and improved options are available to help patients perfect that smile like never before. Fillings, which were previously easy to spot due to their dark metallic color, now come in porcelain or shades designed to match your tooth color. Teeth whitening treatments have become much more efficient, and can make your smile up to ten shades brighter in as little as an hour. Even braces have a much more appealing look, with an "invisible" or clear design that is growing in popularity.

Experience the Changes Yourself

As with any industry, adopting new technologies and procedures takes time and varies by dentist. If a previous experience has deterred you from getting regular care, you may want to research other local options and/or give your current dentist a call to learn about what you can expect today. Your oral health is on the line, and the world of dentistry has changed for the better.

For the latest in dental technology in the best in dentistry, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

WebMD


Cosmetic Dentistry Procedures Explained

19 November 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MACosmetic dentistry is more popular than ever in the US. One's smile is often the first impression that is made...it is one's calling card. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, considered by many as Boston's Best Prosthodontist feels that, "It makes much more sense to spend money for a perfect smile than to spend thousands of dollars on face lifts and tummy tucks!" From teeth whitening and bonding to bridges and implants, there are several treatments that promise to instantly improve your smile and self-confidence. Here are some common cosmetic dentistry procedures:

Teeth Whitening:

This is by far the most common of all cosmetic procedures. You can either opt for over the counter teeth whitening kits or contact your dentist for in-office teeth whitening. Tea, coffee, wine, certain medications, age, and smoking stain the teeth over time. When opting for in-office treatment, the dentist creates a customized mouth tray that fits exactly and ensures that the right amount of bleaching solution reaches the front and back of your teeth.

Bonding:

This technique is used to hide wide gaps between teeth, or if the teeth are broken and chipped. Cavities caused by decay can also be filled using boning. The procedure can be completed in a single sitting where the dentist applies composite resin to the tooth surface. Proper care should be taken to protect the resin or prevent it from stain causing materials.

Veneers:

Thin ceramic pieces are applied to the front surfaces of teeth to improve the shape, color or overall smile. Generally, two visits are required for dental veneers. The result is influenced by the skill of the dentist and the experience of the laboratory ceramist.

Crowns and Caps:

Crowns are used to hide chipped teeth or replace a broken tooth. They’re also cover a tooth that’s had a root canal procedure. The dentist begins by taking an impression of the tooth and building a crown made with bonded porcelain. Sometimes crowns can be made from metal or resin. And to ensure that the crown fits perfectly, he shapes/cuts down the old tooth. This crown is then placed on the damaged tooth using resin cement.

Bridges:

Bridges help close the gaps between two teeth. The bridge could either be made of silver, gold, or porcelain. A typical bridge includes three crowns. These are cemented to either sides of the missing tooth. To ensure that the crown fits properly, the dentist has to prepare and cut the anchor teeth to shape. The success of your bridge largely depends on your dental hygiene- make sure to follow good oral habits.

Dental Implants:

Dental Implants are expensive, but they’re certainly better than bridges because unlike bridges, the adjacent teeth need not be touched.

For more information on the right cosmetic dentistry procedure to improve your smile in the coming year, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

siliconindia.com


Cosmetic Dentistry for A Healthy, Youthful Smile

14 November 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MACosmetic dentistry is the buzz phrase right now. It is the process of creating a healthy, natural, stunning smile. Most cosmetic dentistry procedures are elective, but with such an emphasis on a youthful appearance, cosmetic dentistry is one of the most popular elective cosmetic procedures today. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, whom many considered Boston's Best Prosthodontist, has been on the forefront of aesthetic dentistry development since 1986.

The purpose of cosmetic dentistry is to turn a smile you are not thrilled with into a smile you love to show off. There are many procedures that can help you turn crooked, stained, or gaps in teeth into a straight confident smile: dental implants, dental crowns, dental veneers as well as invisible fillings and teeth whitening.

Dr. Johnson tells us that, "Your smile is how you present yourself, it puts your best face forward and it is your first impression. Now, you can capture all of the potential that a beautiful smile has to offer. Boost self-confidence and self-esteem with a perfect, natural looking smile".

The first step in cosmetic dentistry is to determine what you are looking for in your smile. The goal of cosmetic dentistry is functionality along with enhancing beauty. We will work with you, and give you the smile you are looking for along with facial harmony using the shape of your face, width of your smile, and your teeth.

Enhancing and improving your smile can be as easy as whitening your teeth, or more complicated using dental implants. Regardless of the process, we will help you achieve the youthful smile you want. We will help you make the right decisions on the dental processes you choose. At Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, it is our goal to make you comfortable and to answer all of your questions.

Cosmetic dentistry can improve your self-confidence, improve the health of your teeth, and give you a youthful smile. Contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners to get the smile you have always wanted.


Improve Your Smile And Your Self Esteem

6 November 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MAIf you are unhappy with your teeth, you are not alone. According to a study, more than 1/3 of American adults are unhappy with their smile. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, who many have called Boston's Best Prosthodontist, says, "with today’s dental technology, you no longer have to be the victim of genetics. You can have the smile you want". He has been helping Boston's most demanding people improve their smile using advanced digital technologies since 1986. If you want a new love, a new job, a promotion, or if you just want make a life change and are unhappy with your teeth, read on because you can make a change.

Thirty six percent of those people who are unhappy with the appearance of their teeth, especially young adults, believe they would have a better social life if they had better teeth and a better smile. In fact, 48% of Americans between 18 and 24 have untagged a picture of themselves on Facebook because they don’t like their smile.

Additionally, the study found that bad teeth represent the biggest dating turn-off among men and women. According to the study, 77% of women think crooked teeth are worse than a receding hairline in a potential love interest. In fact, 22% of Americans who are unhappy with their smile think that better teeth would lead to a better love live.

On a professional level, 78% of Americans perceive adults with crooked teeth to be unsuccessful. But, on top of that, 14% of those unhappy with their teeth felt that they might be missing out on a better job.

Professional cosmetic dentistry treatments have come a long way in recent years, with innovative options such as clear aligner trays, dental implants, full-mouth reconstruction, and dental veneers. Healthy teeth can be moved at any age and it's important for adults to know that they are never too old for cosmetic dental treatments.

For more information on improving your teeth and changing your smile and your life, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Statistics - orthodonticproductsonline.com


Take Care of Your Teeth and Decrease Risk of Hypertension

30 October 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MAPeople with high blood pressure (BP) taking medication for their condition are more likely to benefit from the therapy if they have good oral health. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, The research is based on a review of medical and dental exam records of more than 3,600 people with high BP. Researchers found that those with healthier gums had lower BP and responded better to blood pressure-lowering medication, compared with individuals who had gum disease, a condition known as periodontitis. People with periodontal disease were 20 per cent less likely to reach healthy BP ranges, compared with patients in good oral health.

Patients with periodontal disease may warrant closer BP monitoring, while those diagnosed with hypertension, or persistently elevated blood pressure, might benefit from a referral to a dentist. Physicians should pay close attention to patients' oral health, particularly those receiving treatment for hypertension, and urge those with signs of periodontal disease to seek dental care.

Likewise, dental health professionals should be aware that oral health is indispensable to overall physiological health, including cardiovascular status. According to the latest recommendations from the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology, the target blood pressure range for people with hypertension is less than 130/80.

In the study, patients with severe periodontitis had systolic pressure that was, on avererage 3 mmHg higher than those with good oral health. Systolic pressure, the upper number in a blood pressure reading, indicates the pressure of blood against the walls of the arteries. While seemingly small, the 3mmHg difference is similar to the reduction in blood pressure that can be achieved by reducing salt intake by 6 grams per day.

The presence of periodontal disease widened the gap even farther, up to 7 mmHg, among people with untreated hypertension. Blood-pressure medication narrowed the gap, down to 3 mmHg, but did not completely eliminate it, suggesting that periodontal disease may interfere with the effectiveness of blood pressure therapy.

Patients with high blood pressure and the clinicians who care for them should be aware that good oral health may be just as important in controlling the condition as are several lifestyle interventions known to help control blood pressure, such as a low-salt diet, regular exercise and weight control. Dr. Johnson generally recommends visits with the hygienist three or four times yearly for patients with early signs of periodontal disease. and reminds everyone that, "Proaction is always better than reaction"! For more information or for a dental check-up, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

The Economic Times


Use Up Dental Benefits & Medical Savings Accounts....Before the End of the Year

25 October 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MAThe end of the year is fast approaching and this means that dental benefits are expiring. Now is the time to use up your dental insurance. If you have any dental needs, use up your dental benefits before they expire. Unfortunately, time flies and before you know it, 2019 will be here and your benefits for 2018 will be gone.

Too many employees don’t take advantage of their company dental benefits allowing them to expire at the end of each year before they are used up. Too many times, they then find out that they need a dental treatment that won’t be covered in its entirety. Even though dental coverage may not pay in total for certain dental procedures, most dental plans fully cover routine dental care. Also, if you know you need extensive dental work, plan your dental procedure now. Then, when your dental benefits renew at the first of the year, your procedures, like root canals and dental crowns, are more affordable.

If you need a root canal and dental crown, use the available benefits from two calendar years towards the major dental procedures that involve multiple phases.

Schedule extensive dental work now if you need it.

As a general rule, most dental insurance plans offer coverage at 100% on preventative dental care like regular exams and cleanings. Take advantage of your dental insurance benefits, make sure to get your annual dental exams and cleanings. Regular dental care can save you a lot out of pocket expense that your dental insurance may not cover.

For an appointment or consultation, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Yahoo


Why Seeing a “Digital Dentist” Matters

16 October 2018

Digital dentistry or dental treatment utilizing digital technology is now mainstream and part of most quality-focused dental practices. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been called a “pioneer” in the synergistic use of computer technology in implant dentistry wants you to know, “what computer technology is being used in his dental office and how”.

Digital Xrays:


Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MA

    ➢ The image is immediately processed and available to view, whereas film takes time to be developed.
    ➢ Less radiation needed to produce the same quality image as film (digital X-rays gives 70% less exposure to radiation than conventional X-rays).
    ➢ You can enhance the digital image (such as alter brightness and contrast) with a series of processing techniques
    ➢ Grey-scale of digital X-rays offers 256 shades of grey versus 16-25 shades in conventional radiography, which means better diagnostics

CT Scans:


Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MA

    ➢ Three dimensional imaging allows for views from many angles
    ➢ No distortion in image
    ➢ Allows for CAD/CAM diagnostics, design and planning
    ➢ Precise placement of implants – allows for “teeth in a day” approach

Digital Crowns/Impressions:


Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MA

    ➢ Impressions are taken digitally via very high quality photographs.
    ➢ No ‘goop’ in your mouth for 5 minutes
    ➢ Dentistry can be fabricated via CAD/CAM technique which creates a better ‘fit’ of your work which leads to better comfort, aesthetics and longevity.
    ➢ Provides time saving for the dentist and patient

If you have yet to experience the many advantages that a technology revolution in dentistry can offer, it may be time to find a new dentist. None of this is new…time to see it for yourself!

Dr. Ryne Johnson, has been providing outstanding dental care since 1986 and is considered by many as “Boston’s Best Prosthodontist”. For more information, contact Dr. Johnson.


Full Mouth Aesthetic Reconstruction

9 October 2018



Just wrapped up a full mouth, aesthetic reconstruction on a 69 year old woman in our practice. Here are the before & after photos. She was wonderful to work with! I am always happy to see a great result on a grateful patient. Tell you're friends who seek and expect excellence that good dental work can be aesthetic!

A special thank you to my ceramists at Prestige Dental Laboratory (Paul and Zak); you're the best!

For more information on full mouth reconstruction, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.


Options in Cosmetic Dentistry for Fixing Chipped Teeth

8 October 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MAMany people grind their teeth, participate in sports, and have accidents that can cause teeth to chip. This can dramatically affect your smile. In fact, According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, whom many have called Boston's Best Prosthodontist, "chipped teeth are the most common injury to teeth.

Generally, chipped teeth may not cause pain, but nevertheless, they should not be ignored. Any type of trauma to your teeth should receive immediate attention. In fact, there could be damage underneath the surface of the tooth that is chipped.  A dentist can rule out cracks or internal tooth problems that aren’t visible to the naked eye. In many cases, your chipped tooth can be repaired in just one dental visit.

There are various treatments for chipped teeth depending on the amount of damage.

Dental Bonding

Most chips can be corrected with dental bonding. Dental bonding is an efficient, durable and cost-effective way to correct minor chips.

Enamel Shaping

Often used in conjunction with dental bonding, enamel shaping can also correct small chips or surface flaws. During enamel shaping, a small portion of the tooth's surface is removed or recontoured to smooth out imperfections.

Dental Veneers

If the chip is significant and dental bonding or enamel shaping can't be used, you may need a veneer. These thin, porcelain wafers completely cover the surface of the tooth and are often used for front teeth.

Root Canal

Pain in the location of the chip can be a sign that the nerve is exposed. If that's the case, a root canal may be necessary to save the tooth, generally followed by placing a ceramic crown.

Dental Crown

A dental crown is used to completely cover larger teeth or to cap a tooth after a root canal.

Tooth Extraction

If the tooth can't be saved, a tooth extraction may be necessary. The good news is a dental bridge or dental implants can replace missing teeth.

To discuss your options for a repairing chipped teeth, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.


BESPOKE DENTURES… EXCELLENCE IN CRAFTSMANSHIP

28 September 2018

If you are looking for a stress-free solution to replace your missing teeth and are not a candidate for an implant supported reconstruction, you may regain your confidence and achieve a beautifully radiant smile that makes you look and feel good again with a “bespoke denture”.

Many people think that dentures have been left behind in the cosmetic dental revolution, it’s not so! In fact, using the latest technology and techniques, false teeth can create the ultimate smile makeover. The latest in smile design technology can not only restore your smile but take 10 years off your whole face! Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental partners has the expertise and experience to completely customize your dentures to your individual desires. He delivers artistic creations that resemble a natural smile…not one that looks like ‘false teeth’.

See below…a case for a 55 year old man (both dentures are on the same patient); left photo is the denture from a mainstream dental office and ones the right are Dr. Johnson’s custom crafted dentures. The patient had been to three different offices and had three sets of dentures made before doing a set with Dr. Johnson. He reported that he could not speak, eat or “even keep them in” and was desperate for some “quality of life”.

Not only was there an aesthetic improvement, but the patient reported having a prime-rib steak dinner the weekend after inserting Dr. Johnson’s custom dentures….without any adhesive!!!

 


8 Everyday Habits That Harm Your Smile

25 September 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, M

Your teeth are supposed to last a lifetime. But some common habits could be reducing the durability of your teeth without you even realizing it. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and considered by many to be "Boston's Best Prosthodontist, " By recognizing the habits that can compromise the structure and health of your smile, you can take steps to protect it."

1. Avoiding Regular Dental Care

Many individuals skip regular dental cleanings or avoid getting necessary procedures due to anxiety, a lack of time, or other personal reasons. However, doing so can cause tooth decay, gum disease, and other common oral health issues.

As such, you should be sure to visit the dentist every 6 months for a professional cleaning and also, as necessary, if you notice a change or issue with your teeth.

3. Brushing Too Hard

Brushing is an essential component of good oral health, but not when done incorrectly. Brushing too hard can wear down enamel, irritate your gums, increase your teeth's sensitivity, and cause cavities.

By purchasing a soft bristled or an electronic toothbrush, you can avoid the damage while still cleaning your teeth and removing plaque.

3. Using the Wrong Materials to Clean Teeth

Have you ever had something stuck in your teeth and not had floss? If so, you might have reached for things like paper clips, toothpicks, or even pieces of paper that easily slide between your teeth. However, each of these items can cause gum and tooth damage.

You can easily resolve this problem by keeping a small container of floss or an interdental cleaner in your purse, backpack or car.

4. Grinding Your Teeth or Clenching Your Jaw

Many Americans grind their teeth or clench their jaw, which can cause fractures or other damage and may lead to headaches and jaw pain. If grinding or clenching happens while sleeping, a night guard that cushions your teeth and reduces impact on your jaw can help. If it happens during the day, chewing gum may help to prevent it.

5. Biting Your Nails, Pens, Ice, or Other Hard Objects

When you bite your nails, chew on pens, or crunch ice or even hard candy, you could be causing splinters and cracks in your teeth. But that's not all!

In fact, biting any foreign object can also introduce bacteria into your mouth and cause infections. By eliminating these bad habits, you can keep your teeth protected and eliminate additional germs in your mouth.

6. Using Your Teeth Improperly

How often do you bite open a package or try to cut something with your teeth? You may do it without thinking twice and probably more frequently than you realize.

Biting even just a thread off of your shirt could cause micro cracks that, over time, can lead to more serious structural damage. It's easy to avoid this by grabbing for a can opener, knife, or pair of scissors instead.

7. Drinking Soda, Sports Drinks, and Alcohol

While everything is acceptable in moderation, soda, sports drinks, and wine can cause significant damage when consumed in large amounts. Sports drinks and soda, which contain acid and sugar that feed bacteria and erode enamel, leave teeth susceptible to cavities.

Alcohol contains acid that produces similar effects. Additionally, because alcohol dries out the mouth, it reduces saliva production and allows bacteria and plaque to thrive.

By limiting your consumption of all of these drinks, you can do your part to keep your teeth protected.

8. Tobacco Use

If you smoke cigarettes or cigars or use chewing tobacco, you're also at risk. Nicotine not only yellows teeth, it also can cause oral cancer. Chewing tobacco is even worse because carcinogens directly contact gum tissues and can remain there for a long time.

While quitting any tobacco use is difficult, it's worth it when you consider the oral (and general) health risks of daily, or even infrequent, use.

Transform Your Everyday Habits From Harmful to Beneficial

While the habits described above are harmful, there are simple ways to correct them. Transforming destructive habits into protective measures can keep your teeth looking great for years to come. For information on improving your smile, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners

lh360.com


Dental Implants: What you Need to Know

19 September 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners - Dental Implants in Wellesley, Newton, Brookline, Boston, MA

Dental implants are a good long-term solution to replacing lost teeth. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, who has been regarded as "Boston's Best Prosthodontist", "Patients need to consider their options and make educated decisions when they are deciding between bridges and implants. The decisions you make can be the difference in one's quality of life".

1. An implant beats bridges or dentures

Bridges, dentures, and implants are all prosthetic options to replace missing teeth. A bridge requires filing two adjoining teeth, which can make them weaker and prone to decay. Dentures often have fit problems, can interfere with taste and offer a reduced chewing ability. For an implant, a titanium or zirconia screw is placed in the jawbone and a prosthetic tooth is attached. A proper implant has offers better bio-mechanical support and has good longevity.

2. Implants are more expensive generally.

One of the biggest "problems" patients see with implants is the cost. Implants are rarely covered by insurance. But when considering cost you need to consider value. Implants are a permanent, long-term solution that can match your existing teeth. Implants are generally for the rest of your life, and can replicate your teeth in appearance and functionality. If you need multiple implants or if an implant is near a nerve or sinus cavity, it's worth paying for a dentist who has specialized training.

3. Not all implants are equal

Most dentists use implants that have a long-term track record backed by in-vivo (in the mouth) studies. There are also some newer, generic implants that are cheaper but may not have been fully-evaluated yet. So ask your doctor what kind of implant he uses and the success rate he's had with it.

4. Timing can also help

Implants are usually a two-part process -- first putting in the implant, then covering it with a crown six to 12 weeks later. If you know you need one, schedule the initial procedure at the end of a calendar year, then have the dental work put on in the following year. That way you can use two years' worth of your pretax flexible spending account at work to pay a chunk of the cost. You'll reap as much as 30% savings if you're in a high tax bracket.

5. See a Specialist

There are many dentists who perform implant dentistry. However, many do not have the experience, expertise or credentials to handle the nuances that dictate whether your work looks like dentistry or looks like your natural smile. Many have only participated in a weekend continuing education program and then become self-proclaimed "experts". To assure an outstanding outcome, check one's experience, reputation and credentials. A prosthodontist, periodontist and oral surgeons all have at least 3 years of training above and beyond that of a general dentist and are committed to providing "top-shelf" care. Do your homework and your implant dentistry can last a lifetime.

For information on dental implants, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Excerpts – CNN.com


Dental Veneers: Porcelain or Composite?

10 September 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners - Dental Veneers in Newton, Wellesley, Brookline, MA Dental veneers are the solution to many common teeth problems, and they are an option for those looking for a ‘smile make-over’. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners reports that, "Popularity and demand for this procedure continues to increase as people become more aware of it as an option". He is regarded as Boston's "Best Prosthodontist" and has performed countless aesthetic reconstructions in his 30+ year career. Dental veneers are made of either porcelain or composite resin and are able to fix crooked teeth, spaced teeth, chipped or damaged teeth and stained teeth.

Dental veneers: Composite vs. porcelain veneers h2

Dental veneers are bonded to teeth, creating a natural look. Veneers are also a popular choice for those looking to avoid braces. But what is the decision between porcelain and composite resin veneers?

Porcelain dental veneers: The advantages and disadvantages

Porcelain dental veneers are custom made for your teeth and are well known for their natural appearance. The pros include:

  • Porcelain veneers are extremely durable and can last for up to 15 years if taken care of properly.
  • Porcelain’s translucent properties create a very natural look.
  • Resistant to stains caused by food, drink and cigarettes.
  • Applying veneers is a small procedure requiring minimal drilling.

Some of the disadvantages are:

  • Porcelain veneers require two visits to the dentist.
  • They are more expensive than composite resin veneers.
  • Porcelain veneers can’t be repaired and must be replaced if damaged.

The pros and cons of composite resin dental veneers

Composite resin dental veneers are bonded to the teeth with resin cement, which is an extremely quick and easy procedure. The other advantages include:

  • The process requires only one visit to the dentist.
  • Composite veneers are cheaper than porcelain veneers.
  • They are easy and affordable to repair.
  • Composite resin veneers are versatile and easy to remove, replace and repair.

Composite resin veneers have some disadvantages too:

  • They are less durable than porcelain veneers.
  • Composite veneers are widely considered to have a less natural look than porcelain veneers.

Not all teeth are suitable for dental veneers, so consult Newton Wellesley Dental Partners about your specific situation and desires. We will also help you to make a decision between porcelain and composite veneers. Remember to See a Specialist...The Difference will make you Smile. Contact us

Source: News Fix


Mouthwash That May Reduce Tooth Plaque

6 September 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners - Dental Veneers in Newton, Wellesley, Brookline, MA Soon, a mouthwash of iron oxide nanoparticles could save people a trip to the dentist. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Partners, "A new research study in rats shows that such a mouthwash can thwart and stop cavities by disrupting destructive bacterial biofilms that grow on teeth".

Biofilms grown on rat tooth enamel were broken up by a combination of iron oxide nanoparticles and hydrogen peroxide.

The scientists from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine used a formulation called ferumoxytol, which contains iron oxide nanoparticles coated with carboxymethyl dextran. Fermuoxytol is permitted by the U.S. Food & Drug Administration for treating iron deficiency.

The team planned to test the teeth-protecting abilities of these iron oxide nanoparticles because they can break down hydrogen peroxide to develop hydroxyl radicals that can disturb biofilms. The study tested mouthwash therapy involving solutions of ferumoxytol and hydrogen peroxide. They used nanoparticle doses that were below 1% of what is used to treat iron-deficiency.

Over a period of three weeks, the scientists used both solutions twice a day to rinse the mouths of rats with cavities that mimic extreme childhood dental decay. In contrast to animals that did not get the mouthwash, treated rats saw substantial improvements in their dental decay. The mouthwash both stopped the progression of current damage and stopped damage to smooth, healthy teeth.

The method holds promise. In most cases, the only effective way of eradicating a biofilm is physical removal of the infected biomaterial. What’s interesting about this work is the ability of the developed nanoparticles to degrade the biofilm matrix from within.

The health of our teeth and oral cavity is highly dependent on the community of good bacteria living in our mouth. Any nonspecific antibacterial treatment will inevitably affect our good bacteria.

The team is currently involved in developing formulations with higher catalytic activity, and ultimately aims to test the effectiveness of the mouthwash in humans. For outstanding dental care, that is focused on cutting edge techniques and services, contact Dr. Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Source: azonano.com


Porcelain Veneers or Dental Crowns?

28 August 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners - Dental Veneers in Newton, Wellesley, Brookline, MA

Today people have more options to choose from when it comes to cosmetic dentistry procedures. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, has been the 'go-to' dentist for Boston's most demanding patients. According to Dr. Johnson, "For broken, missing, misaligned and uneven teeth, the two most common cosmetic dental procedures are dental veneers and dental crowns".

What is the difference?

Generally, what determines whether you need veneers or crowns is the condition of your teeth and what you are trying to accomplish or ‘fix’ with the procedure. The basic difference between crowns and veneers is how much of the tooth they cover. Dental veneers cover the front of the tooth. A dental crown covers the entire tooth. So, while they are both used for aesthetics and function, they have different applications.

Crowns are used on a damaged tooth or for a tooth that needs more strength and protection. Veneers are used on teeth that are healthy, but may be stained, crooked, short, have spaces between them.

Dental crowns are shaped like your real tooth and they are designed to match your teeth’s natural color. The tooth that it is covering will be reduced in size, and the crown fits perfectly on top of it. Crowns will function and be as durable as your natural tooth. Crowns are perfect to fix teeth that are used for chewing, or for those who clench or grind their teeth.

Porcelain veneers are thin shells that are secured to the side of the tooth that shows when you smile. Porcelain veneers are used on patients who want to improve the shape, color, spacing, or crowding of their teeth.

When choosing a restorative dentist for demanding aesthetic cases, the ceramist used by the dentist is as, if not more important then the office you select. Reputation does matter in this regard....remember to see a specialist, the difference will make you smile.

For more information on dental crowns or porcelain veneers, contact Dr. Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.


Dental Implants: Are They the Right Treatment for You?

22 August 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners - Dental Implants in Wellesley, Newton, Brookline, Boston, MA

Dental implants are one of the most common and long lasting treatments for replacing missing teeth. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been a pioneer in implant dentistry since 1986. He is know for his synergistic use of computers in dental implant reconstructions. Via the combination of CT Scans, placement jigs and CAD/CAM technology, Dr. Johnson and his in-house periodontist are able to diagnose, design and place implants to support sophisticated dental reconstructions in one visit. The "All On Four Technique" has transformed patients lives and is a routine part of Dr. Johnson's repertoire. According to Boston's best prosthodontist, "Dental implants function similarly to a real tooth by replacing the missing tooth with an artificial tooth and root. In this process, the root of the tooth is replaced with a titanium screw. It is inserted into the jawbone and attached with an artificial tooth or a dental prosthesis".

The natural appearance of dental implants is one of its greatest advantages. They look very similar to natural teeth and work better than bridges and dentures. They do not rely on the cement seal between tooth and the dental work and have extraordinary anchorage. Compared to other treatments for replacing missing teeth, dental implants have a significantly more-natural appearance and generally a better long-term prognosis.

Dental implants are easy and a more convenient solution than other options for most patients. They can also be used as a support for dentures because the titanium root is securely screwed into the jaw. Today, most dentists are choosing implants to replace missing teeth and enhance overall appearance.

Though dental implants are more expensive than other treatment options, they can last a lifetime when properly cared for, making them very cost effective. They offer the best "quality of life" in terms of function and longevity. If you are considering dental implants, Dr. Johnson recommends that you see a specialist for the best outcome, "Many dentists are taking a weekend continuing education course and project themselves as experts. Four the best outcome, check one's experience, credentials and reputation before initiating care". For one or more missing teeth, consider dental implants for a younger, healthier, more natural appearance.

Contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners or Dr. Johnson, directly, for more information on this attractive and long-lasting treatment option.


Older Americans Who Neglect Dental Care put Overall Health at Risk

13 August 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MA

Conscientious parents constantly remind their children to brush and floss and routinely schedule dental checkups to make sure their teeth and gums are healthy and staying that way. But youngsters aren’t the only ones who can use such reminders. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners says, "Older Americans need to put a priority on their oral health as well, and research shows that as a group they aren’t doing so".

In fact, the statistics are grim. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that almost every single American over age 65 (96 percent) has had a cavity, and 20 percent have untreated tooth decay. Another 65 percent suffer from gum disease, an ailment that has been linked to a host of other problems, such as strokes, heart disease, and diabetes.

Anyone who thinks they can ease up on dental care as they age is making a big mistake. Not only do poor dental habits affect what’s going on in your mouth, they also affect your overall health.

Older Americans who neglect oral care put overall health at risk, and some of the CDC’s findings are troubling.

Tooth loss

Nearly one in five adults aged 65 or older has lost all of his or her teeth. Complete tooth loss is twice as prevalent among adults aged 75 and older (26 percent) compared with adults aged 65 to 74 (13 percent). The CDC points out that having missing teeth or wearing dentures can have a detrimental effect on nutrition. It’s not surprising that people who have lost teeth, or wear denture, often are going to choose soft foods that they can chew easily. They will pass up fresh fruits and vegetables that are more nutritious but also more difficult for them to eat.

Oral cancer

Cancers of the mouth (oral and pharyngeal cancers) are primarily diagnosed in older adults, and the median age at diagnosis is 62 years. That’s another reason it’s important for older people to have regular checkups. Your dentist can check for signs of oral cancer during those visits.

Dry mouth caused by medications

Most older Americans take both prescription and over-the-counter drugs, many of which can cause dry mouth. Reduced saliva flow increases the risk of cavities. Saliva helps prevent tooth decay, gum disease, and bad breath and also lubricates the mouth, making it easier to eat, swallow, speak, and taste food. Sometimes, dry mouth might just cause mild discomfort. At other times, it can lead to significant oral disease that can compromise the person’s health, dietary intake, and quality of life.

As you age, proper oral care is just as important as ever. It’s not something you want to ignore because your overall health is at stake.

For more information on oral care, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

suindependent.com


Dental Veneers are a Very Popular in Cosmetic Dentistry

8 August 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners - Dental Veneers in Newton, Wellesley, Brookline, MA

There are so many dental procedures available these days ..how does one know which option is best? Dr. Ryne Johhnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been delivering outstanding aesthetic results since 1986 for demanding and discriminating patients in greater Boston. He has been a per-annual "Top Dentist" according to Boston Magazine's "Top Docs" issue. Dental veneers are one of the most common and most-sought after dental treatments for improving your smile. According to whom many consider Boston's best prosthodontist, "Veneers can transform one's smile if done correctly but too often they are placed haphazardly or poorly and look like bad dental work. Well done veneers should be imperceptible".

We are inundated by media photos so we are surrounded by beautiful smiles...generally ones that have been altered and improved. We put quite a bit of emphasis on our physical appearances. Because we are surrounded by attractive smiles, we go to great lengths to improve upon our appearance, particularly our smile. First impressions are based upon a smile. Studies show that someone with a beautiful smile appears healthier, is more-successful and appears younger.

Of all the dental procedures, dental veneers are one of the most common and most-sought after. Dental veneers are extremely thin, custom-made shells made of tooth-colored porcelain that are designed to cover the front surface of your tooth to improve appearance, size, shape, length and color.

Dental veneers can fix many common dental problems; gaps between teeth, broken teeth, chipped and worn teeth, or discolored teeth. Veneers can also fix teeth that are misaligned, misshapen or uneven dramatically improving the look of a smile. Many people are choosing veneers over orthodontics, which can necessitate a lengthy treatment.

Dental veneers are a great solution for long-lasting results and are a great investment for your confidence and your peace of mind. With proper care and maintenance, dental veneers can last 10+ years if done well. If you seek to improve your smile, remember to see a specialist, one who has proven expertise and a stellar reputation....the difference will be noticeable. For more information on porcelain veneers, contact Dr. Ryne Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.


Treatment Options for Replacing Missing Teeth

1 August 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MA

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has be helping people replace missing teeth for over 30 years. "There are many options for replacing teeth, single or multiple teeth. Dental implants generally are the preferred approach, but the other options definitely have their place as well".

Dental implants

Dental implants have revolutionized the world of tooth replacements. They allow replacement of on or many teeth with a prosthesis that has great longevity, looks and feels like a natural tooth and allows for easy oral hygiene. "One of the greatest advantages that implants have over bridges is that they stand alone - they don't require any cutting or alteration of adjacent teeth. Implants can be used to replace a single tooth, multiple teeth, or to secure a denture in place. Dental implants allow bone growth in the area of the missing tooth/teeth. Without the implant acting as a placeholder, the bone recedes over time, making it difficult to hold a denture in place". In addition to these benefits, a dental implant cannot get cavities or decay. "The success rate of single dental implants is as high as 98% over the long term. Compare that with a bridge which has at least two teeth that can decay causing failure of the entire unit".

Bridges

"Fewer bridges are done now because of the benefits of dental implants, but bridges still represent an important way to address gaps in your smile from missing teeth; often when implants are not an option. A bridge relies on the strength of the surrounding teeth for support and for that reason, it is even more important than ever to take care of your teeth after getting a dental bridge".

Dentures

Dentures are a removable solution (it comes in and out of your mouth) and is usually reserved for cases where there are several missing teeth or finances limit doing implants or bridgework. For a single tooth, most people don't use this option unless it is a temporary fix until something more stable can be done".

Dr. Johnson has been called Boston's Best Prosthodontist and has been a perennial "Top Dentist" recognized by Boston Magazine. If you seek and expect excellence, for your options for replacing missing teeth, contact him at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Source: CDAPress.com


Is Sparkling Water Bad for My Teeth?

24 July 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MA

Is the satisfying fizz of your favorite sparkling water putting you at risk for tooth decay? Because any drink with carbonation—including sparkling water—has a higher acid level, some reports have questioned whether sipping sparkling water will weaken your tooth enamel (the hard outer shell of your teeth where cavities first form).

So, Is Sparkling Water Affecting My Teeth?

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners wants you to know that, "sparkling water is generally fine for your teeth—and here's why". In a study using teeth that were removed as a part of treatment and donated for research, researchers tested to see whether sparkling water would attack tooth enamel more aggressively than regular lab water. The result? The two forms of water were about the same in their effects on tooth enamel. This finding suggests that, even though sparkling water is slightly more acidic than ordinary water, it's all just water to your teeth.

Tips for Enjoying Sparkling Water—and Protecting Your Teeth

  • Sparkling water is far better for your teeth than sugary drinks. In addition, be sure to drink plenty of regular, fluoridated water, too—it’s the best beverage for your teeth. Water with fluoride naturally helps fight cavities, washes away the leftover food cavity-causing bacteria feast on and keeps your mouth from becoming dry (which can put you at a higher risk of cavities).
  • Be mindful of what’s in your sparkling water. Citrus-flavored waters often have higher acid levels that does increase the risk of damage to your enamel. Plan to enjoy these in one sitting or with meals. This way, you aren’t sipping it throughout the day and exposing your teeth over and over again to the slightly higher level of acid it contains.
  • Sparkling water brands with added sugar can no longer be considered just sparkling water. They are a sugar-sweetened beverage, which can contribute to your risk of developing cavities. So remember—sparkling or not—plain water is always the best choice.

For more information on dental health, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Source: mouthhealthy.org


Breathe New Life into Root Canal-Treated Teeth

17 July 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MA - Root Canal Treatment

A root canal can be a literal lifesaver for an infected tooth, but the process does involve cutting off the blood supply, robbing that particular tusk of its natural defenses. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, "there is a way to fabricate new blood vessels in teeth, which may offer a way for them to regain important functionality".

A root canal is typically called for when tissue inside the tooth, called the pulp, becomes inflamed or infected and causes problems such as decay, cracks or chips. It involves removing this infected tissue and replacing it with a synthetic material encased by a protective crown.

"This process eliminates the tooth's blood and nerve supply, rendering it lifeless and void of any biological response or defense mechanism," says Dr. Johnson. "Without this functionality, adult teeth may be lost much sooner, which can result in much greater concerns, such as the need for dentures or dental implants. Often we are doing implant dentistry on failed root canals".

In coming up with a solution, researchers developed a way to bio-print artificial vascular networks that imitate the body's circulatory system. This involves using a bio-printer to create tiny fibers that serve as a mold, which for the purposes of this research were made from sugar molecules.

This mould was then laid across the root canal of an extracted human tooth and injected with a gel-like material filled with dental pulp cells. After that, the fiber was removed to leave a small channel along the root canal, into which endothelial cells taken from the interior lining of the blood vessels were inserted. After seven days, the researchers report that dentin-producing cells, which is one of the four tissues making up human teeth, started forming near the tooth walls, and that artificial blood vessels began forming inside the tooth.

"This result proves that fabrication of artificial blood vessels can be a highly effective strategy for fully regenerating the function of teeth," says Bertassoni, the lead researcher on the project. "We believe that this finding may change the way that root canal treatments are done in the future.

Although this technique is yet to be available to the public, it may offer an opportunity to save teeth naturally. When considering any of your dental your options, remember that reputation and expertise matter. Dr. Johnson is perennially regarded as one of Boston's best dentists and had been providing outstanding dental care, to people who seek and expect excellence, since 1986. See a specialist...the difference will make you smile.

Source: New Atlas


Cosmetic Dentistry and a Healthy Smile

10 July 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MAA smile can change the whole appearance of people and enhances their charming personality. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, "Studies have shown that a beautiful smile not only is an indication of overall health but also projects confidence and success. There are many dental procedures that are considered cosmetic in nature but knowing which ones are appropriate for you is critical".

To treat the problems of many individuals who have bad and unhealthy teeth, new techniques in cosmetic dentistry provide avenues to that beautiful smile. In fact, a variety of cosmetic dental procedures enhance your smile while they also provide good and healthy looking teeth. These procedures are porcelain veneers, ceramic crowns, re-contouring, cosmetic bonding and invisible braces.

Bad teeth lead to being self-conscious, people find it embarrassing to have bad teeth. People who are uncomfortable with their teeth are uncomfortable in social gatherings, they don’t want to smile or hide their smiles. This presents a self-consciousness or lack of self-esteem.

For healthy looking teeth, dentists will advise cleaning teeth twice a day; this will also help a person stay away from many diseases. Many people have yellow teeth and this is what makes them uncomfortable. A cosmetic dentist can help them by providing in- office teeth whitening.

There are no limits in cosmetic dentistry and Dr. Johnson has been providing outstanding, integrity-based dentistry since 1986. He sees patients who seek and expect excellence. If you have a smile you that are not comfortable with and you are interested in discussing your different options, contact the cosmetic dentists at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.


Causes of Sleep Apnea

3 July 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MASnoring used to be more of an annoyance rather than a danger to your physical and oral health.

Now, we understand that there is actually a risk associated with snoring, you could have sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is a potentially harmful sleep disorder during which people stop breathing, periodically, throughout the entire night.

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is the most common type of sleep apnea, and occurs when the muscles in the back of the throat collapse, causing the opening through which air passes to disappear. Certain people are more likely to experience sleep apnea than others. Who are they?

Obesity – this is one of the most indicative risk factor. Obese adults are seven times more likely to develop sleep apnea than their normal-weight adults. Excess weight adds to the pressure on the airway making the diameter of the opening even smaller than it already is.

Neck Circumference – obese people and professional athletes have larger-than-average necks and this can cause sleep apnea.

Age – sleep apnea is more common in older people, although people of any age can develop it. As we age we lose tone and elasticity. With that natural softening of the tissue in the throat, there's higher likelihood of collapse.

Family History – while there is no genetic predisposition to developing sleep apnea, you can inherit certain aspects of your physical makeup that increase sleep apnea risk like a narrow jaw.

Alcohol Use – as a muscle relaxant, alcohol too close to bedtime can lead to episodes of sleep apnea. Alcohol can also lengthen the duration of apnea episodes.

Race - Sleep apnea risk and severity vary by race.

Smoking - smokers are 2.5 times more likely to have sleep apnea nonsmokers. Smoking is an irritant and can cause airway tissue to swell.

Gender - middle-aged men are twice as likely to have sleep apnea than women.

Sleep apnea can be treated with CPAP machines and oral devices. Both have the place, but for patients that are fed up with CPAP there is an alternative to that unattractive tight mask, bulky, and loud machine. Oral devices can treat mild to moderate sleep apnea more comfortably than a CPAP machine.

Oral appliances are placed in the mouth and are worn like an orthodontic appliance or sports mouth protector. No machines and they are virtually unseen. For treatment options for sleep apnea, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.


Dental Implants or Keep the Tooth?

26 June 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MAMany people call us when they have tooth problems. When they are advised to have their tooth extracted and replaced with a dental implant they often wonder if this is necessary, or if they should keep their natural original tooth. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, "that all depends on the problem. There are scenarios where keeping the tooth some combination of root canal therapy or surgical intervention but in many instances dental implants are a better option".

"Dental implants are great for tooth-replacement or in larger reconstructions to provide support for the definitive dentistry. As far as tooth replacement, you have lots of options, but dental implants best mimic a natural tooth as far as look and functionality. They also help the jawbone and the jawline to maintain its density and volume".

The key word to consider when discussing dental implants is the word replacement, not substitution. Dental implants have a ‘root shape’ and they have been in use for about 30 years. Dr. Johnson is considered a pioneer in the synergistic use of CT scans, CAD CAM and digital laboratory techniques in implant dentistry. Over time he has been developing and perfecting this approach. His first computer-designed implant case was completed in 1988. Using this approach, the case can be studied, designed and placed with incredible precision which impacts the time-line and esthetic outcome.

If you have a tooth that is broken down and cannot be saved or if there are many teeth that need to be addressed, the best choice for replacement is a dental implant. If you had periodontal disease which is compromising your jawbone, then the best avenue would be to extract the teeth, preserve the jaw, and use implants as tooth substitutions. Dental implants can use the remaining jawbone and are healthier and safer than the natural teeth.

If your teeth are salvageable with no further damage to your jaw, teeth and mouth, get the natural teeth fixed. If your teeth and jaw are compromised it would be best to replace those teeth with dental implants.

For more information, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.


A Healthy Smile Will Help You Look Younger

20 June 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MAEveryone sees physical changes with age. Unfortunately, your teeth are not immune to aging either. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, "Age can bring many changes in your smile. While skin experiences a loss of elasticity and collagen, the teeth and gums go through age-related wear and tear, which can accentuate an aged appearance". The signs of an aging smile are tooth color, wear and loss of gum tissue. But age does not have to show in your smile and your smile does not have to show your age. Your smile does not have to make you look older, in fact, it can make you look younger. With the right dental treatments, you can transform your smile and take years off your appearance.

Since 1986 Dr. Johnson has been the 'go-to' dentist for Boston's corporate leaders, sports figures and people who are in front of others. All demand a naturally radiant smile without the appearance of major dental work. He is regarded by many as Boston's Best Prosthodontist and is comfortable working on Boston's most demanding people. His use of surgical, computer and prosthodontic techniques has made him a perennial "Top Dentist" in Boston Magazine's annual issue.

"As we age, teeth begin to wear. Worn teeth can negatively affect fullness in the face; enhancing already sagging facial features and making them appear even more aged. With age, the surfaces of your teeth may shorten from chewing, which can make the face and facial profile appear collapsed. This makes it appear older", says this 56 year old prosthodontist.

Veneers or crowns can be the optimal choice for correcting worn and misshapen teeth. Porcelain veneers or dental crowns can lengthen and whiten your teeth. In cases where the patients’ lower and upper jaws have become too close together due to wear, the bite can be restored to bring back the length and to make the face much fuller and more proportioned.

For a younger looking smile, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

New Beauty Magazine


Cosmetic Dentistry Options

12 June 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental PartnersToday there are several different types of cosmetic dental treatments that everyday people can choose from. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, "patients can rejuvenate smiles that have been affected by bad dental work, age, accidents, oral health problems and other issues.

Treatment possibilities are dependent on a variety of factors, including health status, age, and severity and type of cosmetic issues. The cosmetic procedures offered can often be combined with more extensive needs for aesthetic improvement, which allows patients the option of achieving a smile and appearance that suite and pleases them".

Dr. Johnson offers a personal approach to cosmetic dentistry, giving all patients individualized treatment and discussing options that will suit their lifestyle and their budget. He has been regarded as one of Boston's Top Dentists and is considered a pioneer in digital dentistry. If you have aesthetic issues that concern you, there is now a cosmetic dentistry procedure that can meet your needs.

Many complete cosmetic enhancements can be performed in one visit, increasing the convenience for busy people who are trying to achieve that beautiful smile. Cutting-edge equipment and the latest techniques combine to enhance the value of the cosmetic dentistry choices.

Patients may receive recommendations a number of different treatments depending on their cosmetic needs. For example, tooth discoloration can be addressed with in-office teeth whitening treatments or porcelain dental veneers depending on the severity and origin of the problem. With veneers, structural issues, such as cracks, chips and gaps can also be permanently concealed while strengthening teeth.

When patients consider cosmetic treatment you need to weigh your needs against your budget and time constraints by considering both noninvasive and invasive options. For more information, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

prnewswire.com


How to Choose the Right Dentist

4 June 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MANo matter what age you are, going to the dentist should be a regular part of your health routine. However, many people put off going to the dentist and many don’t have a regular dentist. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, "avoiding the dentist can be one of the most costly mistakes one can make".

Putting off regular dental exams is not a good idea. In fact, dental disease does affect your overall health and can ultimately lead to more invasive dental procedures and more expense down the line. You may put it off because you have been going to the wrong dentist for years. Your dentist is like a shoe, they have to be the right fit for you.

You need to feel comfortable with your dentist and your dentist office. Many people have an innate fear of the dentist, but the fact is that taking care of your mouth and teeth is imperative. So you need a dentist who can be informative and relaxing, and in cases of dental anxiety, you need a dental office that can provide sedation dentistry.

Choose a dentist office with the latest in comprehensive dental care with expertise in restorative dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, orthodontics, implant dentistry, general cleanings, and TMJ pain. This way, no matter what comes up you have an office that can handle it all. Most dentists now are using computers in their practice. Radiographs, CT-scans, computer milled crowns and fillings are commonplace. If your dentist is still practicing "old-school", you may be pleasantly surprised by recent advancements.

When searching for a new dentist, here are some suggestions.

It’s not as easy as seeing who is in your insurance provider pool. Ask friends and relatives for their recommendations, read reviews, and pay attention to how you are treated over the phone when you make the appointment. The internet can provide a wealth of information on a provider. During your appointment, be sure that the dentist explains any necessary procedures and why you need those procedures.

For more information on a comprehensive dental office in Newton, Brookline and Wellesley, contact Newton Wellesely Dental Partners.

Excerpts - NWItimes.com


Dental Veneers: Porcelain or Composite

15 May 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MADental veneers are the solution to many common teeth problems, and they are an option for those looking for a ‘smile make-over’. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, "Popularity and demand for this procedure continues to increase as people become more aware of it as an option. Many of my patients look to freshen their smile and veneers are a great way to look and feel younger. Dental veneers are made of either porcelain or composite resin and are able to fix crooked teeth, spaced teeth, chipped or damaged teeth and stained teeth".

Dental veneers: Composite vs. porcelain veneers

Dental veneers are a thin material bonded to teeth, creating a natural look. Veneers are also a popular choice for those looking to avoid braces. But what is the decision between porcelain and composite resin veneers?

Porcelain dental veneers: The advantages and disadvantages

Porcelain dental veneers are custom made for your teeth and are well known for their natural appearance. The pros include:

  • Porcelain veneers are extremely durable and can last for up to 15 years if taken care of properly.
  • Porcelain’s translucent properties create a very natural look.
  • Resistant to stains caused by food, drink and cigarettes.
  • Applying veneers is a small procedure requiring minimal drilling.

Some of the disadvantages are:

  • Porcelain veneers require two visits to the dentist.
  • They are more expensive than composite resin veneers.
  • Porcelain veneers can’t be repaired and must be replaced if damaged.

The pros and cons of composite resin dental veneers

Composite resin dental veneers are bonded to the teeth with resin cement, which is an extremely quick and easy procedure. The other advantages include:

  • The process requires only one visit to the dentist.
  • Composite veneers are less expensive than porcelain veneers.
  • They are easy and affordable to repair.
  • Composite resin veneers are versatile and easy to remove, replace and repair.

Composite resin veneers have some disadvantages too:

  • They can stain over time
  • They are less durable than porcelain veneers.
  • Composite veneers are widely considered to have a less natural look than porcelain veneers.

Not all teeth are suitable for dental veneers, so consult Dr. Ryne Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners with any questions or concerns. We will also help you to make a decision between porcelain and composite veneers. Contact us at www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

News Fix


Choose the Right Dentist...See a Specialist

9 May 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MANo matter what age you are, going to the dentist can cause some level of anxiety. Whether you suffer from fear of the dentist, fear of the unknown, or if you struggle with sitting in the dental chair for a long time; there can be all kinds of reasons that keep you from making a dental appointment. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodotist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, "putting off regular dental exams is not a good idea. Pro action is always better than reaction and dental disease does affect your overall health. Often, procrastination will ultimately lead to more invasive dental procedures and more expense down the line".

But, you may be hesitant to go to the dentist. It could be because you have been going to the wrong dentist for years. Your dentist is like a shoe, they have to be the right fit for you, or the experience can be ‘uncomfortable’ or the results can "look like dentistry". Many people do not realize that dentistry has specialists just like medicine. There are children-dentists, orthodontists, gum-specialists, root canal specialists, oral surgeons and a little known specialty called PROSTHODONTICS. A prosthodontist is a specialist who has advanced training in teeth & mouth restorations. Many procedures involve crowns, bridges, TMJ therapy and implant work. They receive three years of additional training and knowledge in restorative and implant dentistry.

Choose a dentist office who has an advanced degree. One with the latest in comprehensive dental care, with expertise in restorative dentistry, cosmetic dentistry, orthodontics, sedation dentistry and TMJ pain. Now, no matter what comes down the line, you have an office that can handle it all in Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

When searching for a new dentist, here are some suggestions. Ask friends and relatives for their recommendations, check credentials, seek experience and reputation, read reviews, and pay attention to how you are treated over the phone when you make the appointment. During your appointment, be sure that the dentist explains any necessary procedures, risks and options and why you need those procedures. Is the office doing digital dentistry and is the office up to date? The decisions you make will influence your outcome, your smile and the longevity of your dental health!

Remember...See a specialist, the difference will make you smile.

For more information on a comprehensive dental office in the Newton area, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Excerpts - NWItimes.com


Bad Breath: How to Get Rid of It

3 May 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MAHalitosis is the technical name for bad breath. Halitosis is the third-most-frequent reason for going to the dentist, behind tooth decay and periodontal disease. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, "The intensity of bad breath changes during the day, because of eating certain foods, obesity, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Bad breath may be transient or persistent. Transient bad breath disappears after eating, brushing, flossing, or rinsing with mouthwash".

Persistent or chronic bad breath is a more serious condition, affecting 25% of the population in varying degrees. At Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, we have some tips for you to rid yourself of bad breath.

Tongue scraping- Bacteria collects on the tissue of your tongue and causes a bad odor. To avoid this, brush your tongue while brushing your teeth with your tooth brush or a tongue scraper.

Regular flossing- Bacteria can colonize in the gums between the teeth and if not removed at least once per day, an unpleasant odor can result. The solution: Floss at least once per day!

Regular hygiene visits- The hygienist uses special instruments to remove plaque and calculus leaving your teeth biologically sound. A toothbrush and floss alone, no matter how frequently used, cannot reach areas that the dental hygienist can. It’s important to attend regular dental hygiene visits to stop periodontal disease from developing.

Regular Dental Exams- Tooth decay is also a form of disease. Bacteria cause the tooth to erode which releases a foul odor. To detect any untreated decay it’s important to come in for a dental exam at least twice per year.

Regular use of alcohol-free mouthwash- Mouthwash helps lower the level of bacteria that causes bad breath. We recommend using alcohol-free mouthwash to prevent from dry-mouth.

Chewing sugar-free gum with xylitol- Chewing gum helps loosen soft depositing that may accumulate on your teeth after eating and in between brushing.

The right toothbrush- An electric toothbrush is far superior in removing the bacterial layer than a manual toothbrush. Use an electric toothbrush and make sure to replace the head every 3 months.

For more information on getting rid of bad breath, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners in Newton.


Losing Teeth in Middle Age Could Raise The Risk of Heart Disease

24 April 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MAPeople who lose two or more teeth during middle age may be more likely to develop heart disease, scientists have found. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners recently came across a published study of nearly 61,000 adults aged between 45 and 69 which showed those who lost two or more teeth had a higher chance of developing coronary heart disease than those who didn't lose any teeth. People's risk had still increased after researchers took into account their diet, level of physical activity, body weight, hypertension and other risk factors. The researchers did not suggest how tooth loss and heart disease were linked, but experts have said in the past that bacteria could travel from infections in the mouth into the bloodstream and cause inflammation in blood vessels, which is associated with heart disease.

Coronary heart disease is a common killer and accounts for 22 per cent of all premature deaths, in the US it kills 370,000 people every year. The NHS says most cases are preventable. It is caused by a build-up of fatty deposits in the arteries, which restricts blood flow to the heart and can cause heart attacks. People at higher risk of developing coronary heart disease include smokers and those with high cholesterol, high blood pressure or diabetes.

Links have been made between the condition and dental health in the past; tooth loss is a symptom of poor oral health and, this study suggests, an indicator of a higher risk of heart disease. Anyone who lost two or more teeth - regardless of how many they had at the start - had a 16 per cent higher risk, but the risk among those who had 25-32 teeth was 23 per cent higher than those who did not lose any teeth.

In addition to other established associations between dental health and risk of disease, our findings suggest that middle-aged adults who have lost two or more teeth in the recent past could be at increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

That's regardless of the number of natural teeth a person has as a middle-aged adult, or whether they have traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as poor diet or high blood pressure.

The relation between dental health such as tooth loss and cardiovascular has been well documented in various research studies. Dr. Johnson recommends an every 3 month dental cleaning for many of his adult patients with early signs of gum disease. "Pro-action is always better than re-action" quips Dr. Johnson. "Why wait for significant dental problems to arise or to risk a cardiovascular incident"?

For more information, contact visit www.NewtonWelleselyDentalPartners.com or contact Dr. Johnson with any questions.


Do You Really Need to Floss?

17 April 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MAAlongside washing your face before bed and eating your daily greens, flossing twice a day is one of those pieces of health advice that you know you're supposed to be following to a tee. In reality, though? It's not always happening (just me?).

As far as the flossing commandment, however, I can probably count on one hand (maybe even one finger) how many people I know who floss on the reg—which completely goes against what all dentists say.

Then again, the health staple has even come under fire in the past couple of years, with the Associated Press announcing that there's no scientific evidence that you need to be flossing daily. So what gives?

Most dentists say: "Everyone should floss at least once a day. If you don't, you leave food particles between the teeth and under the gums that can cause cavities, gum disease, and bad breath."

The problem lies in your toothbrush, which only reaches roughly 25 to 50 percent of your tooth surfaces. Brushing alone doesn't go between the teeth or under the gum, where food particles get stuck—and that's the area where most adult cavities form.

Your tooth has five surfaces. You can only clean three of them by brushing, so two-fifths aren't getting cleaned unless you floss. That's not a passing grade in anyone's book. Sigh—and no one wants a failing grade in hygiene.

If you avoid the situation and stick to your toothbrush only, you risk developing cavities, gingivitis, and eventually periodontitis—which is a serious gum infection that could destroy the bone that supports your teeth (yikes). And you can lose teeth. But, fear not—I asked about the absolute minimum amount of flossing that you can get away with and still have healthy teeth.

The answer? Once a day.

I suppose. For more information, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

MSN.com


Repair Missing Teeth for Better Health and More Confidence

10 April 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MNo one knows better the importance of a beautiful smile than one who struggles with missing, crooked, or gapped teeth. It may affect job security or hiring, you may hesitate to meet people or struggle in new situations. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, "Your smile is directly related to your self-confidence and success".

Missing teeth not only affects your smile and self-esteem, they can have a far reaching domino effect on your bite and overall oral health. Healthy teeth can do more than give you an attractive smile; they can protect you from more serious health problems. Dental implants provide a permanent solution to missing teeth. Porcelain dental veneers can fix gapped, crooked or smaller teeth. Both options give you an attractive and confident smile.

A missing tooth usually causes other teeth to shift into the missing space. This miss-aligns your upper and lower jaws causing teeth to space out, crowd, flare out, or chip due to uneven forces when the teeth come together. Tooth movement can also lead to root damage and extreme wear and tear on your gum line and jawbone. Gaps in teeth are also the perfect place for food and plaque to collect which leads to tooth decay.

Dental Implants are the next best thing to a natural tooth. Dental Implants are a substitute for the missing tooth’s root so they are perfect for replacing missing adult teeth. Dr. Johnson has been performing implant prosthodontics since 1988 and is regarded as a pioneer in the synergistic use of CAD/CAM and CT scans in dental implant reconstructions. They are a permanent, comfortable solution that resemble your natural looking teeth. With dental implants, your teeth will never feel unnatural; but you will see the difference in your smile. Today, implants provide you with quick, comfortable, affordable, and attractive permanent teeth that will improve your health and your self-confidence.

While it is important to have your missing teeth repaired for aesthetic reasons, it is also very important to have them repaired for health reasons, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners for more information or for a consultation.


Considering Cosmetic Dentistry? Choose a Prosthodontist

3 April 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MAThinking about dental veneers, or invisible braces or just improving your smile? Learn the real truth about most cosmetic dentists and you may think again.

  • There's been a significant rise in people seeking cosmetic dentistry
  • There's also been a surge in number of cases of negligence or disappointed outcomes
  • Under-qualified practitioners are trying to cash in
  • Many dentists claim to be "cosmetic dentists" without any additional credentialing, experience or expertise

When you are seeking a cosmetic dental procedure, do your homework. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners recommends that, "you double check and make sure your dentist is qualified". In fact, seek the services of a prothodontist. Prosthodontists have 3 more years of training and expertise than a general dentist. And anyone can call themselves a cosmetic dentist.

In the past five years there has been a significant increase in the number of people seeking cosmetic dentistry - and a similar surge in the number of cases of negligence as under-qualified practitioners cash in.

There is a huge rise in cases involving cosmetic dentistry because so many people want to emulate that Hollywood smile that dentists now see cosmetic dentistry as a lucrative sideline.

There are no controls - any qualified dentist can set themselves up as a cosmetic dentist without further specialist training.

Dr. Johnson wants you to be an educated patient. He will educate you on the procedures that are right for you, and he encourages you to get several opinions. But most of all, he is interested in having you find the best and most qualified dentist to meet your needs and for you to be satisfied with your beautiful, new, pain-free smile.

For more information on cosmetic dentistry or the difference a prosthodontist can make, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Excerpts – DailyMail


How To Eat Your Way To Whiter Teeth

27 March 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MAAre you whitening your teeth while looking for a snack to get through those hunger pangs?   Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners  wants people to know that there are better options when it comes to your teeth's appearance. 

Below are the best treats that'll enhance the natural white undertones of your teeth, and help drive away the stains we're all guilty of building up over the years. Unless you were blessed with the world's most perfect set of teeth or you have seen a good dentist to create that radiant smile, a couple of shades whiter will make you look healthier and more-youthful.

While there are toothpastes that claim to give you a whiter smile in 'just one use (but not really), and there's always the option of getting professional teeth whitening by a dental professional, chances are you don't have the money or the patience to get that gleaming tooth look.

However, Dr. Johnson is here to tell you that there are foods we guarantee you're already eating that are scientifically proven to give you whiter teeth as you chow down on them. Yes, you have our permission to fist pump.

So, put down that coffee (or glass of red wine, depending on your beverage preference and where you are in the world at this point in time), and grab yourself one of these foods to gnaw on instead...

Apples

Thanks to their crisp skin and firm inner texture, biting into an apple helps to remove any plaque build up on your teeth. Try eating one after lunch if you don't fancy brushing your teeth in the office loos (shudders).

Cheese

Now that you've picked yourself up off the floor, we're happy to deliver the best news ever. A protein in milk used in hard cheeses has been shown to reduce the loss of tooth enamel, which you need to keep your teeth looking their gleamiest.

Almonds

It doesn't take a genius to know that chewing on lightly abrasive, hard nuts will help rub off plaque and wear any stains off the surface of your teeth.

Pears

Dental professionals recommend munching on pears because their subtle acids help break down staining bacteria colonies in your mouth and on your teeth.

Cucumbers

Cucumbers are a good source of fibre for gums and teeth alike​, and their crunchy consistency helps remove sugar and chemical debris from the hardest to reach places in your teeth. Maybe just lay off the hummus...

Greek Yogurt

Dairy products are teeth superfoods. Their high calcium content strengthens teeth, making enamel healthier and whiter. Excellent news for all you 'breakfast people' out there...

Strawberries

Unlike other berries, strawbs act as a natural astringent that helps to remove surface discolouration from the enamel of your teeth. What better excuse do you need to indulge in champagne and strawberries this eve?!

Carrots

Just like the apple, crunchy carrots help rub away unsightly stains from your teeth. We knew Bugs Bunny was onto something.

Banana Peels

Bananas contain minerals and vitamins, such as potassium and magnesium, which help whiten teeth. However, don't throw away the skin once your done - take the inside of a banana peel and gently massage your teeth with it for a speedy surface-level cleanse.​

So, next time you find yourself without a toothbrush, you'll know what to do...  If not, a speedy way to make your teeth look way whiter is through in office teeth whitening procedure. Contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners for more information.

foodandwine.com


Let Your Smile Make the Right First Impression

21 March 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Patners, Newton, MASpring is a season of renewal. Maybe this is the time change your life. Maybe look for a new job, a new love, a new look? Start with a new smile. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, "positive impressions often come down to the power of an attractive smile. So, when it comes to that desired job interview, candidates should flash those pearly whites to make a positive impression".

A study says that 48% of adults think a smile is the most memorable feature after they meet someone for the first time. This is even more powerful than the spoken word which raked in 25% of respondents. The way someone dresses pulled in 9% and the way someone smells got 8% of respondents.

It’s pretty close across generations since 52% of adults older than 50 and 45% of the 18-49 demographic are most likely to remember a smile after they’re introduced to someone for the first time.

That said, it’s not just any smile that gets remembered. It has to be attractive in order to be equated with a positive first impression. So, how does one define an appealing smile?

Well, the same survey revealed that some Americans view people differently if they have crooked or stained teeth. That’s viewed as less attractive, according to 37% of respondents. In fact, 25% of survey participants indicated people were viewed as less confident than people with “perfect” teeth.

Other than the tip to smile at a networking event, job interview, and anything related to first impressions, smile online as well for your professional headshot for all of your social media profiles.

To put your best smile forward this Spring, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Patners.

mediabistro.com


Why Choose a Prosthodontist for Dental Implants?

14 March 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MASo you're ready to do some dental implants. If so, do your homework and choose a prosthodontist. Unlike a general dentist, a prosthodontist specializes in smile reconstructions and has three years of additional education and additional expertise above and beyond dental school. They are the 'architects' and 'finished carpenters' of quality-focused dental care.

A prosthodontist, like Dr. Ryne Johnson of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, will often use CT sans and computer diagnostics to understand the bone-topography how dental implants will impact your smile. They know how to balance your bite, and ensure that your normal speech pattern is not affected once the dental implants have been placed.

Prosthodontists will also customize your dental implants to fit your individual needs...a custom approach is ALWAYS better. Many dentists tout some expertise from a conference or correspondence course but prosthodontists are the REAL DEAL! The result will be the most attractive, natural looking and appropriate mouth restoration for you.

Dr. Johnson has been performing dental reconstructions, using implants since 1988, and has lectured on this topic throughout the country. That experience means that he can handle the complicated cases in addition to the cosmetically-demanding situations. Why settle for less?

Tips for Choosing a Prosthodontist

  • Prosthodontists have more years of education than general dentists, be sure they are "board eligible or certified".
  • Ask to see records of specialty training the prosthodontist has recently completed.
  • For the best results, choose a prosthodontist whose office uses 3D imaging (CT scans & CAD/CAM).
  • As a specialized dental field, prosthodontics is always advancing. Talk to your prosthodontist about the most cutting-edge treatments and how they can be used to give you the best smile possible.
  • Choose a prosthodontist who compassionately and carefully listens to your needs.

When considering dental implants, do your research and choose the treatment plan and prosthodontist that you are most comfortable with. Your smile is worth it! Contact Dr. Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners for more information.


A Perfect Smile Through Cosmetic Dentistry

7 March 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, MAWith magazines, billboards, and television, perfect, white smiles are all around us. As a result, cosmetic dental procedures are becoming more and more popular every year. Dr. Ryne Johnson, managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been called Boston's best prosthodontist for his utilization of digital dentistry to achieve outstanding cosmetic outcomes for his patients.

Beautiful teeth aren't just for celebrities anymore. Cosmetic dentistry is no longer a luxury, but a viable and reasonable option for anyone wanting to improve their smile. There are a number of reasons a patient might opt for cosmetic dentistry.

From traumatic injuries to permanent stains to missing or gapped teeth, cosmetic dentistry can help even the toughest cases. You don't have to wish for the perfect smile any longer. Dr. Ryne Johnson can transform your teeth and give you the smile you've always wanted.

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners offers any array of cosmetic dentistry services, from bonding and contouring to dental veneers and teeth whitening. Always dreamed of a dazzling smile? Tired of noticing coffee stains on your teeth? You don't have to put up with stained or yelllowing teeth any longer. More than ever it is very important to have dazzling white teeth and a beautiful smile. Teeth whitening and bleaching have become very popular options for patients over the last few years. It's a simple procedure that over time whitens and brightens your teeth. Patients have been immensely happy with the results.

If you're tired of having crooked teeth but don't want to spend a couple years wearing braces, then look no further than dental veneers. A cosmetic option that has grown in popularity, dental veneers are thin shells that are permanently adhered to the front of your teeth, producing a flawless, straight smile. Patients have been extremely satisfied with dental veneers. The procedure is simple and painless, and often requires little to no anesthesia. This is the perfect solution for adult patients who want to improve the appearance of their teeth but don’t want braces or invasive dental procedures.

For more information on cosmetic dentistry, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

einnews.com


Options for Fixing a Chipped Tooth

22 February 2018

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Newton, Brookline, Wellesley, MATeeth are the hardest tissue in the body, but they can chip, crack (fracture) or break. Treatment for a broken or chipped tooth will depend on how severely it is damaged. Here are some ways Dr. Ryne Johnson may repair your broken or chipped tooth.

Dental Filling or Bonding

If you have chipped off just a small piece of tooth enamel, Dr. Ryne Johnson may repair the damage with a filling. Bonding is a simple procedure that typically does not require numbing the tooth. To bond a tooth, the dentist first etches its surface with a liquid or gel to roughen it and make the bonding material adhere to it. Next, the dentist applies an adhesive material to the tooth followed by a tooth colored resin. After shaping the bonding material to look like a natural tooth, the dentist uses a light to harden the material.

Dental Cap or Crown

If a large piece of tooth breaks off or the tooth has a lot of decay, you may need a crown to replace the missing tooth structure. Permanent crowns can be made from metal, porcelain fused to metal, all resin, or all ceramic. Different types have different benefits. Typically crown procedures take two visits. At the first appointment the dentist will remove part of the remaining tooth in order to cover it with a crown, or tooth-shaped cap. Impressions will be taken and you will go home with a temporary crown. At the second visit, the temporary crown is removed and permanent crown is bonded into place.

Dental Veneers

If a front tooth is broken or chipped, a dental veneer can make it look whole and healthy again. A dental veneer is a thin shell of tooth-colored porcelain or resin composite material that covers the whole front of the tooth (much like a false nail covers a fingernail) with a thicker section to replace the broken part of the tooth.

To prepare your tooth, your dentist will remove from about 0.3 to 1.2 millimeters of enamel from its surface. Next the dentist will make an impression of the tooth to be sent to a dental laboratory, which will make the veneer. When the veneer is ready, usually a week or two later, you'll need to go back to the dentist to have it placed. To place the veneer, your dentist will first etch the surface of the tooth with a liquid to roughen it. The dentist then applies a special cement to the veneer and places the veneer on the prepared tooth. Once the veneer is in position, your dentist will use a special light to activate chemicals in the cement to make it harden quickly.

For more information on repairing chipped teeth, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

webmd.com


SEX QUESTIONS FROM YOUR DENTIST?

23 January 2018

You’ll often hear a plethora of questions at your next dental checkup, like: do you have any toothaches, or pain when you chew? Do you floss every day?

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners says that, “there may be another line of questions coming: those about your sex life. Questions about oral sex may be the key to prevention of oropharyngeal cancers of the throat, tonsils and back of the tongue, which can be caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) spread through oral sex”. But lots of dentists are falling short on the practice, a new study in the Journal of the American Dental Association suggests.

That’s what researchers discovered after holding four focus groups with dentists at a regional dental conference. While most dentists screened for oropharyngeal cancers, many fell short on actually talking to their patients about the cancer. In fact, most only talk about the cancer when they see a patient who already has symptoms of it, like a painless lump in the neck or a sore throat that doesn’t go away, according to the statement. That means lots of patients are missing out on important conversations about risk factors and prevention methods.

Barriers against asking these questions include a lack of privacy in most dental offices, plus a fear of embarrassing the patient when bringing up a pretty sensitive topic. “Given the alarming increase of HPV-attributable oropharyngeal cancers, dentists and dental hygienists may be key agents for promoting HPV prevention,” study author Ellen Daly, Ph.D., said in the statement. “However, there’s a serious need for better training and education in the dental community.”

And that’s especially true since HPV-fueled throat cancer is a growing problem: Before 1990, only 21% of Oropharyngeal cancers included the presence of HPV. After 2000, that number grew to nearly two out of every three samples, according to a meta-analysis from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. HPV can be passed from one person to another during skin-to-skin contact. One way HPV is spread is through sexual activity, including vaginal and anal intercourse and even oral sex.

Most people with HPV infections of the mouth and throat have no symptoms, and only a very small percentage develop oropharyngeal cancer. Oral HPV infection is more common in men than in women. In some studies, the risk of oral HPV infection was linked to certain sexual activities, such as open mouth kissing and oral-genital contact (oral sex). Smoking also increases the risk of oral HPV infection . At this time the US Food and Drug Administration has not approved a test for HPV infection of the mouth and throat.

The number of oropharyngeal cancers linked to HPV has risen dramatically over the past few decades. HPV DNA (a sign of HPV infection) is now found in about 2 out of 3 oropharyngeal cancers and in a much smaller fraction of oral cavity cancers. The reason for the rising rate of HPV-linked cancers is unclear, although some think that it could be because of changes in sexual practices in recent decades, in particular an increase in oral sex.

The researchers believe the study highlights the importance of using the dental visit as a way to educate patients about their own risk factors, what symptoms they should watch for, and what they can do to protect themselves. They hope the results encourage dentists to enhance their own communication efforts with their patients about the disease, which may play a role in reducing their risk.

So don’t be surprised if your next visit includes some questions about your oral sex life. If your dentist doesn’t bring it up, know the symptoms—mentioned above—yourself. And if you experience them, see your dentist or your doctor, stat. As for avoiding it in the first place? The HPV vaccine, which can prevent against cancer-causing strains, is usually given during adolescence, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends it through age 26 for men if they meet certain criteria. Using condoms and dental dams correctly can also lower your risk.

For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org or if you’d like to contact Dr. Johnson directly, CLICK HERE.

Original article: http://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical
Artwork: iStock


SQUID INK IN DENTISTRY?

20 December 2017

Your future dentist visits could become a pleasant pain-free experience, and it’s all thanks to squids. A team of engineers from the University of California San Diego have developed an imaging method using squid ink and ultrasound to check for gum disease.

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been promoting periodontal health for over 30 years.

If you’ve ever had to get your mouth checked for gum issues, you know that the current method to assess gum health involves inserting a periodontal probe’s metal hook in between your gums and teeth. Sometimes, depending on the dentist’s technique your pain tolerance, it hurts. The team’s method eliminates the need for probing — you simply need to gargle some food-grade squid ink mixed with water and cornstarch.

Squid ink is rich in melanin nanoparticles, and those get trapped in the pockets between your teeth and gums. When a dentist shines a laser onto your mouth, the nanoparticles swell and create pressure differences in the gum pockets. That’s where the ultrasound part of the imaging method comes in. Ultrasound can detect those pockets, so dentists can create a full map of your mouth.

The result shows how deep those pockets are, which indicate gum health. That’s why dentists stick a probe in those pockets to begin with — if they’re only one to three millimeters in depth, it means your gums are healthy. Anything deeper than that is a sign of gum disease, and the deeper those pockets are, the worse the issue is.

Problem is, the results of periodontal probing depend on the amount of pressure a dentist uses and the area he’s probing. He could be probing the wrong location or putting too little or too much pressure. Jesse Jokerst, the study’s senior author likened the periodontal probe to “examining a dark room with just a flashlight” wherein “you can only see one area at a time.” He said that their method is more like “flipping on all the light switches so you can see the entire room all at once,” leading to more accurate findings.

The engineers have big plans for their creation, starting with replacing the lasers in the method with more affordable LED lights. Their ultimate goal, however, is to create a mouthpiece that can instantly assess your gum health. They also want to get rid of the the squid ink concoction’s salty and bitter taste, though I’ll take than any day over painful probing.

So until the, Dr. Johnson reminds his patients to have regular, preventative visits with the hygienist. Brush and floss daily…remember, “you only have to clean the teeth you wish to keep”. For more blogs by Dr. Johnson or to contact him directly, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org

orginal article: https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/squid-ink-could-dentist-visits-140000793.html


THE AFFECT OF AGGRESSIVE BRUSHING

28 September 2017

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners came across an interesting article that he wishes to share.

It outlines the long term impact on people who are ‘aggressive’ brushers.

We have been recommending the Braun Oral-B and Sonicare Electric brushes for many years. We also recommend a visit with the hygienist every three, four or six months for routine cleaning and examination.

For additional dental topic discussions, visit:
www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

Here is the URL for the article:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/how-the-traditional-nylon-toothbrush-may-be-causing_us_578fad7ee4b0f529aa07836f?utm_hp_ref=dental-health


NEWTON WELLESLEY DENTAL PARTNERS “TOP DENTIST” IN BOSTON, MA

10 August 2017

Dr. Ryne Jonhson and Newton Wellesley Dental Partners was selected as the “top dentist” for prosthodontics and implant dentistry by Boston Magazine 2017.

http://www.bostonmagazine.com/top-dentists/find/ryne-s-johnson/


SCUBA DIVERS HAVE SPECIAL DENTAL RISKS

12 July 2017

Scuba divers should consult their dentists periodically to prevent a condition known as “diver’s mouth syndrome,” says Dr. Ryne Johnson, regarded as Boston’s best prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Diver’s mouth syndrome, known technically as barodontalgia, can include gum problems, pain in the jaw joint, or a condition known as “tooth squeeze,” in which changing pressure causes pain in the center of a tooth. “Many divers drag the bulky air regulator through the water with their teeth, and this can cause stress or damage to the oral cavity. Divers may bite too hard on the mouthpiece which can lead to pain in the jaw joint and gum lacerations. Complicating this problem is the fact that most standard mouthpieces are too small for most people and only support the very back teeth. Divers really have to work to keep their lips pursed around these small pieces of rubber.”

But the problem, he says, is easily remedied. “If a diver feels pain or soreness in the jaw, he or she should consult with a dentist,” says Dr. Johnson. “A custom-fitted mouthpiece is available in most scuba shops that will support all of the teeth, so these problems can be avoided.”

Tooth squeeze can occur when a cavity, a deteriorated or broken dental filling, a dental abscess or an incomplete root canal has developed an air space and reacts to the changing pressure once the diver is under water. It can occur both in descent and ascent as can other squeeze problems. “It can be very painful, but the irony is that many divers do not feel it because of the exhilarating experience they feel at being in the water. When divers do feel tooth squeeze, they should schedule a dentist visit to get the appropriate dental care.”

Dr. Johnson recommends that divers be in good dental health before diving. Be wary of scuba diving if you have recently undergone dental treatments in which there was a tooth extraction or if a tooth contains a temporary filling. “The change in pressure can cause severe pain and cause healing to take much longer,” says Dr. Johnson. “Be cautious if you have dentures. “Be sure they are well-fitted; have them relined or remade if necessary.”

Go to a dentist where you can be evaluated for joint pain or earaches. “Custom-made mouthpieces are readily available. Yes, they cost more, but you will be amazed at the difference,” says Dr. Johnson. “It’s worth the cost because the dive will be much more comfortable.”

It’s never too late to improve your dental health. Visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com for more blogs or to contact Dr. Johnson


CAN GUM DISEASE AFFECT OVULATION?

14 June 2017

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Women struggling to get pregnant need to take good care of their gums, a study has found. Bacteria that causes gum infections appears to have a role in making conception take longer”. According to a recent study, “Women with bacteria that causes gum disease in their saliva, P. Gingivalis, took three times longer to get pregnant than women without. And women with the bug as well as symptoms of periodontitis – disease of the gum and underlying bone – took four times longer”.

Researchers believe that infection in the gums and jawbone leads to further inflammation in the body. This inflammation may prevent ovulation or could stop the embryo implanting. Women struggling to get pregnant need to take good care of their gums, a study has found. Researchers think gum disease might be a warning sign of problems elsewhere in the body – particularly type two diabetes and heart disease”.

Additionally, post-menopausal women are more likely to die early if they have gum disease according to this study. Women who lose teeth after the menopause are at a higher risk of an early death, experts have warned. A major study suggests gum disease and tooth loss is a red flag for severe health problems.

Study leader Dr Michael LaMonte, of the University at Buffalo in New York, said no matter the cause of the link, more intensive dental screening in old age could help nip problems in the bud. Other possible effects are inflammation interfering with hormone production, as well as contributing to endometriosis, a condition where tissue that normally grows inside the womb grows elsewhere in the body. Dr Susanna Paju, of the University of Helsinki said: ‘Our study does not answer the question on possible reasons for infertility but it shows that periodontal bacteria may have a systemic effect even in lower amounts, and even before clear clinical signs of gum disease can be seen.

Thus, Dr. Johnson suggests that, “results encourage young women of fertile age to take care of their oral health and attend periodontal evaluations regularly”.

How the study was carried out:

Researchers at the University of Helsinki studied 256 healthy non-pregnant women aged between 19 and 42 who had stopped contraception and were trying to get pregnant. The health of their mouths and gums, as well as their reproductive organs, were examined. Over 12 months they were observed as to whether they became pregnant or not. Researchers believe gum infection leads to further inflammation that may prevent ovulation.

Key findings :

Gingivalis Bacteria was ‘significantly more frequently detected in the saliva among women who did not become pregnant during the one-year follow-up period than among those who did.’

The research found women who either had P. Gingivalis in their saliva – or antibodies indicating they had been infected by P Gingivalis, were three times less likely to get pregnant, while those with the bacteria and signs of gum disease were four times less likely to get pregnant.

The bacteria remained a factor even after other factors that have an effect on getting pregnant such as socioeconomic status, general health and smoking were considered.

Original article: www.dailymail.co.uk/health

Artwork: www.freepik.com


POT MOUTH? – WELLESLEY, NEWTON, MA

26 April 2017

We recently had a college student return from college in Colorado who came to the office for a general visit. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners reports that, “Upon reviewing his medical history before a routine cleaning appointment, “John” admitted to “smoking a lot of pot” during his four years away. There was a raised, white area along the cheek”.

Like Colorado, Massachusetts has recently adopted policies that allow for recreational use of Marijuana. There are dispensaries being planned around the state and a likely increase in recreational use of Pot is certainly coming.

Ganja, Hash, Weed, Mary Jane are but a few of the more common names for cannabis which is a plant-derived drug. Commonly abused, about 2.5% of the world’s population uses cannabis. It can be used in several preparations, with dried leaves and flower (marijuana) that are smokes being the most common. Other methods include smoking via water pipe or vaporizer, adding marijuana to food and consuming it, and using concentrated liquid forms.

Dry mouth is a common problem experienced for one to six hours after using cannabis, as well as an increased appetite. Both lead to becoming more vulnerable to an oral attack from foods and sweet drinks. Thermal injury to the tissues is seen in an additional effect by other opportunistic infectious agents.

And our college student? Because it is virtually impossible to distinguish between these benign entities and carcinoma, biopsy is essential. If dysplasia is demonstrated, consider such lesions premalignant. They have the propensity to transform into carcinoma in situ or invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Thus, such leukoplakic growths must be excised completely and the region observed closely for recurrence. … a biopsy report of hyper-keratosis.

Lessen learned!

For other Blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here. To contact the office or Dr. Johnson, click here.

Artwork: www.researchgate.net
Original article: Dr. Gerald Fine


EARLIER DEATH IN OLDER WOMEN RELATED TO GUM DISEASE? -WELLESLEY, NEWTON, MA

4 April 2017

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners found an article that resonates with his patient base which he wants to share: Research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association suggests that, “gum disease and tooth loss are connected to a higher risk of early death in women past the age of menopause.” Michael J. LaMonte, lead author of the study and a research associate professor at the University at Buffalo in New York, notes that the findings only suggest an association between oral health and premature death. CNN adds, “The research does not show gum disease or tooth loss cause early death.” However, according to Dr. Johnson, “there are many published findings that correlate gum disease with many medical entities like cardiac issues, pancreatic cancer and poor diets”.

For the study, HealthDay (3/29/17, Preidt) reports that investigators “tracked data on more than 57,000 women aged 55 and older.” The researchers found that “a history of gum disease was associated with a 12 percent higher risk of death from any cause.” In addition, researchers found that loss of natural teeth was associated with “a 17 percent increased risk of death from any cause.” Dr. Johnson recommends a 4x/year regimen with a talented hygienist for many of his periodontally compromised patients. He adds, “it is clearly the best ‘bang for your buck’ in dentistry and can save you many thousands of dollars over one’s lifetime”.

MouthHealthy.org provides oral health information for adults over 40 and adults over 60. MouthHealthy.org also provides additional information for patients on gum disease.

For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson or to contact him directly, visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

Original article in CNN.com

Artwork: www.healthline.com


GERIATRIC DENTAL ISSUES – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

24 March 2017

There’s a commonly understood recipe for living a healthy life as we get older, and it goes something like this: Exercise, eat healthy food in moderation, don’t smoke, get plenty of sleep, maintain a good social network and engage in mentally challenging activities.

Yet, according to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “there’s another, largely overlooked, ingredient: oral health care”. Because our bodies become more vulnerable as we age, decay, infections and bacteria that occur in teeth, gums and mouth can grow into serious problems that impact overall health. Plus, there are issues seniors have that exacerbate problems and inhibit a senior’s ability to brush, floss or visit the dentist. Medications can create dry mouth. Arthritis limits dexterity and creates transportation and mobility issues. And a lack of dental insurance can halt regular dentist visits.

“Many of older adults are getting used to living in pain,” says Johnson. “They have active infections that have been going on for five, 10, 15 years. Poor oral hygiene is particularly harmful to seniors”.

Poor oral hygiene can increase risks for diabetes, pneumonia, infections elsewhere in the body and strokes, he says. Also, mouth cancers — which can be discovered through regular dental checkups — can go undetected. Many seniors wish they had access to better dental care. But often, after retirement, they lose dental insurance and can’t afford new coverage. Medicare, for instance, doesn’t cover most dental work. In 2012, a survey indicated that being able to afford dental care was the No. 1 health issue for seniors, even more than general medical care (38 percent to 30 percent).

Among the primary oral-health issues older men and women face are:

Dry mouth: Having a drier mouth can be part of the aging & geriatric process. But older people tend to be on more medications, and hundreds of those medications inhibit production of saliva, which protects against tooth decay and controls bacteria. “That creates an environment that is very acidic, because the saliva is not there anymore,” says Johnson, “That leads to more tooth decay, gum disease and an increase in bacteria”. Some studies have shown gum disease can lead to heart disease. And an increase in bacteria has been linked to a higher risk of pneumonia (with bacteria breathed into the lungs) and diabetes. It’s important for seniors to drink more water to battle dry mouth. Also, seniors should provide their dentist a list of medications they are taking.

Oral cancer: Rates increase with age, so if seniors skip regular dental checkups, they run the risk of cancers going undetected early. And even seniors who have no natural teeth and use a full set of dentures should continue regular checkups for mouth cancer.

Caregivers: it’s important for the people who care for seniors to help them with brushing and flossing, and to make certain they see a dentist regularly. “Very often, I have a family member telling me, ‘My mom or dad was scrupulous with their health and took excellent care of their teeth, and now they’re in horrible condition,’” says Johson. “A lot of decay, a lot of periodontal illness because they just lost the capacity to take care of themselves. It takes some active intervention on the part of their families or others.”

“The importance of education can’t be overstated. The baby boomers’ tsunami wave is coming,” says Johnson. “This is a problem that is upon us, whether we want it or not. We have to continue improving the educational process to avoid potential problems.”

The Centers for Disease Control offers a checklist for seniors to maintain good oral health that includes:

  • Drink fluoridated water and use fluoride toothpaste to protect against tooth decay.
  • Brush and floss regularly to reduce dental plaque and prevent periodontal disease.
  • See your dentist regularly, even if you wear dentures and have no natural teeth.
  • Avoid tobacco and limit alcohol to lower risk of oral and throat cancers.
  • Caregivers should provide daily oral hygiene for seniors unable to take care of themselves.
  • If medications produce a dry mouth, ask your doctor if there are alternate medications that can be substituted. If not, drink plenty of water or chew sugarless gum to keep your mouth moist.

For additional information on this topic visit the American Dental Association: www.mouthhealthy.org/en/adults-over-60. For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson or to contact the office, visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

Original article: San Diego Union-Tribune
Artwork: yourdentalpartners.com


DENTAL IMPLANTS (KNOCK OFFS & THEIR RISK) – WELLESLEY, NEWTON, MA

2 March 2017

Squeezed between billboards promoting “Free Donuts” and “855-Car-Hit-U”, I recently spotted an ad for $400 dental implants. Radio also has numerous promotions for “teeth-in-a-day”. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “This makes for a market that creates confusion for the public. There really is a huge difference between quality and cheap”!

There are dozens of dental implant companies that sell implants in the USA. However many of these companies are copies or “clones” of other successful implants. Since these smaller companies do very little research or development, they are usually 1-2 generations of implant design behind the major companies. In the many implant complication cases referred to us, we have seen a higher rate of problems in the “clone” implants…even though they look very similar to the major implant brands.

An additional concern is that as smaller implant companies come and go there is a risk of not being able to get parts compatible with these numerous implants to make the crowns or bridges that attach to them. I would not put a clone implant into a family member’s mouth (not even my mother-in-law!). Innovative companies that approach implant dentistry responsibly with research and education provide quality and service are doing very well, while implant companies that compete only on price are not a good fit for any practice.

Would you want a discounted hip or knee implant? How would you feel if your dentist was charging you the regular price and giving you a cheap implant knockoff? Do you even ask or know? The consumer needs to know that all implants are not created equal, and they should ask what brand is being used at a particular office.

Here are some implant companies that Dr. Johnson has worked with over his 29 years of clinical practice and have a good track record and lots of data: Biomet 3i, Zimmer Dental, Straumann, Keystone, Astratech and Nobel Biocare.

For more information on Dr. Johnson, click here
To arrange a consultation or contact the office, click here
For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here

Original publication by Dr. Mitchell Josephs on LinkedIn
Artwork: www.oralanswers.com


DENTISTRY: A HEALTHY LIFESTYLE – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

8 February 2017

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners wants his patients to lead a healthy lifestyle and have outstanding oral health. A recent article in Bicycling Magazine outlined the top ways to stay healthy and a regular visit to your dentist is critical. According to Dr. Johnson, “A visit to the dentist can make your pearly whites shine—and keep your ticker on track, as well”. In a recent Taiwanese study people who had their teeth cleaned at least twice a year for 2 years had a 24% lower risk of heart attack and a 13% lower risk of stroke compared with people who never went to the dentist. Professional teeth cleaning appears to reduce inflammation-causing bacterial growth, which can lead to dangerous inflammation, say the study authors.

Here’s the list:

  1. Eat Calcium Rich Foods
  2. Fill up on Anti-oxidants
  3. Go to the Dentist
  4. Cook with Herbs and Spices
  5. Load up on Potassium
  6. Take Blood Pressure Medicine at Night
  7. Treat High Blood Pressure
  8. Stay Active
  9. Run a Mile
  10. Eat Walnuts
  11. Feast on Fish
  12. Sprinkle Flax Seed on your Cereal
  13. Eat Dark Chocolate…in Moderation
  14. Start your Day with Oatmeal
  15. Snack on Nuts
  16. Switch to a Better Cooking Oil

For more blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here
To contact the office or Dr. Johnson directly, click here

Artwork: adobe stock photos


DENTAL PROBLEMS RELATED TO SCUBA DIVING – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

4 January 2017

A new survey of recreational scuba divers finds that 41 percent report dental problems related to diving. Most of the problems had to do with pain from the increased pressure underwater or from clutching the air regulator too tightly in their mouths, but a few people experienced loosened crowns or cracked fillings. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners reports that, “over my 30 years in clinical practice, I have seen numerous patient who presented with broken or shifted teeth induced by long-time use of a regulator”. He further recommends, “The survey was limited, but suggests that people should make sure their teeth are in good shape before they go deep. An unhealthy tooth underwater would be much more obvious than on the surface. One hundred feet underwater is the last place you want to be with a fractured tooth."

Underwater toothache

Barodontalgia is a toothache caused by the increase in pressure felt underwater (it can also happen at high altitudes because of low pressure). The condition, which occurs while the person is in the high- or low-pressure environment, is most common in people who have some sort of underlying dental condition, like a cavity or poorly completed filling.

Forty-one percent of respondents of a recent study said they'd experienced dental symptoms while diving. Of those, 42 percent said they'd had barodontalgia. The second-most common symptom was pain from holding the air regulator too tightly (24 percent of those who'd had a dental symptom), and the third-most common problem was jaw pain (22 percent of those who'd had a dental symptom).

Protecting your teeth

Several people reported that a dental crown — a cap that fits over a broken or damaged tooth — had loosened during a dive. One person reported a broken filling. The dry air and awkward position of the jaw while clenching down on the regulator is an interesting mix. Dive instructors reported more pain and problems than casual divers. Instructors spend more time at shallower diving depths, where the changes in pressure are most abrupt.

Divers are required to meet a standard of medical fitness before certification, but there are no dental health prerequisites," according to Dr. Johnson. In the meantime, divers can protect themselves by visiting the dentist before scuba diving to check for decay and other problems.

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Original article: http://www.livescience.com
Artwork: www.scubadiving.com


TEETH GRINDING & STRESS – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

3 January 2017

Research has found a link between stress and teeth grinding, which 70 percent have reported. Known as bruxism, teeth grinding can go undetected as the most common symptom is a headache, usually concentrated at the temples of the head. Other symptoms include sleep disorders, ear ache, and stiff muscles in the jaw, shoulders and neck. The teeth will also show signs of wear, cracks and tooth loss can result.

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been treating teeth grinding and TMJ therapy for over thirty years. “Many people grind their teeth at night and we used custom-made, hard appliances (with a softer, resilient liner) to lessen the impact of this significant force” says Johnson. “The night guard is designed to absorb the impact and spread the force out over all the teeth instead of allowing it to wear away the enamel”.

What the doctor says: ‘If you suspect that you are suffering from Bruxism, it is important to see your dentist who can provide a proper diagnosis”.

“Grinding your teeth can be triggered by several factors including an underlying sleep disorder, stress and anxiety or a result of dietary intakes such as alcohol and caffeine”.

“Your dentist will recommend a guard specially made for your teeth to create a protective barrier from friction to prevent increased tooth wear and reduce discomfort of the jaw muscles.”

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original article: http://www.dailymail.co.uk

artwork: http://www.arizonafamilydental.com/


DENTISTRY AFTER ROOT CANALS IMPACT TOOTH LONGEVITY – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

16 December 2016

“In a recent longitudinal, retrospective analysis, researchers found that what one does AFTER a root canal procedure directly influences the longevity of that tooth” says Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. “Teeth with endodontic therapy have been hollowed out and need internal and external protection to prevent fracturing. This cannot be accomplished with fillings, according to this study” says Dr. Johnson. “After 30 years of restorative dentistry, I can attest that the best means to improve longevity on a root canaled tooth is with a dental crown”.

Methods

Computerized analysis was performed for all patients who received posterior RCT from 2008 to 2016 in the graduate endodontic department. Data collected included dates of RCT, type of post-endodontic restoration, and time of extraction if extracted. Teeth that received crown after RCT were also divided into 2 groups: receiving crown before 4 months and after 4 months after RCT. Data were analyzed by using Kaplan-Meier log-rank test and Cox regression model (α = 0.05) by using SPPS Statistic 21.

Results

Type of restoration after RCT significantly affected the survival. Those that received composite/amalgam buildup restorations were 2.29 times more likely to be extracted compared with those that received crown. Time of crown placement after RCT was also significantly correlated with survival rate. Teeth that received crown 4 months after RCT were almost 3 times more likely to get extracted compared with teeth that received crown within 4 months of RCT.

Thus, according to Boston’s best prosthodontist, “it’s best to protect the tooth as soon as possible to avoid problems”.

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Original article: http://www.ada.org
Artwork: www.OswegoSmiles.com


USING COMPUTERS IN IMPLANT DENTISTRY – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

8 December 2016

There is archeological evidence that humans have attempted to replace missing teeth with root form implants for thousands of years. Remains from ancient China (dating 4000 years ago) have carved bamboo pegs, tapped into the bone, to replace lost teeth, and 2000-year-old remains from ancient Egypt have similarly shaped pegs made of precious metals.

In 1952 the Swedish orthopaedic surgeon, Per-Ingvar Brånemark, was interested in studying bone healing and regeneration. During his research time at Lund University he adopted the Cambridge designed “rabbit ear chamber” for use in the rabbit femur. Following the study, he attempted to retrieve these expensive chambers from the rabbits and found that he was unable to remove them. Brånemark observed that bone had grown into such close proximity with the titanium that it effectively adhered to the metal and the birth of current day implants was seen.

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, whom many consider a pioneer in using computer in implant dentistry, has developed a synergistic technique to remove many of the early pitfalls seen in implant placement and dental prosthetics. He has been performing implant reconstructions since 1989 with the assistance of computers. His current approach is outlined below:

1. Initial examination and work up to simulate the final design of the dental prosthesis (think architectural plans when building a home).
2. Create a three dimensional representation of this plan (either a denture or some other means to position teeth for the patient & doctor to evaluate form, aesthetics, phonetics
3. Convert this into a X-ray scanning guide (to wear during the CT scan) or to scan the mouth with CAD/CAM appliance
4. Merge the digital data into software that creates a 3-D image of the newly designed plan overlaid onto the existing bone contours
5. Evaluate bone and other anatomical structures related to planned implant placement
6. Determine implant angulation, length, diameter, position, etc
7. Create a surgical placement jig
8. Place implants using placement jig
9. Place dental prosthesis (often at same visit as implant placement)

Dr. Johnson uses this approach on most of his dental implant cases and states, “I can’t imagine why more clinicians are not following this protocol as it has diminished our complications and often allows our patients to go home with a ‘tooth’ the same day implants are placed. Why accept less?

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Original content: www.wikipedia.com
Artwork: www.perfectdentalimplant.com, www.wikipedia, www.texasimplant.com


DIGITAL DENTISTRY IMPACTS HOLLYWOOD – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

6 December 2016

Digital models of humans can be uncannily accurate these days, but there’s at least one area where they fall short: teeth. Unless you’re willing to scan the inside of someone’s mouth, you aren’t going to get a very faithful representation of someone’s pearly whites. Dr. Ryne Johnson, a prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been considered a pioneer in the use of CAD/CAM technology in dental restorations. He notes that, “Disney Research and ETH Zurich have just developed a technique to digitally recreate teeth beyond the gum line using little more than source data and everyday imagery. The team used 86 3D scans to create a model for an “average” set of teeth, and wrote an algorithm that adapts that model based on what it sees in the contours of teeth in photos and videos. Unlike the $40,000 CAD/CAM unit that’s used in my office, this new approach allows sufficient accuracy to be captured from regular digital photographs”.

The technology doesn’t require any special capture equipment outside of the initial scans (the camera on your phone will do). Also, you don’t have to purposefully bare your teeth: it can work with the incomplete information from a smile or grimace. A movie crew could generate models based on a brief, natural motion capture session.

This being Disney, the most obvious use is for digital actor models in animated movies and video games. You could see uncannily realistic characters whose details pass muster even in close-up shots. However, there are plenty of medical uses as well. The scientists see dentists using the tech to previsualize a patient’s mouth before they sit in the operating chair, and it’s easy to imagine this leading to more authentic-looking dentures. As silly as the notion of accurately rendered teeth may be, they could be important for your well-being.

Dr. Johnson feels that this new technology will help the film and media production companies but will not be incorporated into a dental office any time soon. However, he reminds everyone that, “digital dentistry is here and should be a part of your dental reconstructive and implant work”.

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Original article: www.engadget.com
Artwork: Chenglei Wu, Derek Bradley et. al.


DR. RYNE S. JOHNSON’S GREATEST HITS! – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

5 December 2016

Watch the video below and see why Newton Wellesley Dental Partners and Dr. Ryne Johnson has the reputation as “Boston’s Best Prosthodontist”, “World Class Dental Aesthetics”, and “Cutting Edge Implant Dentistry.”


CERAMIC DENTAL IMPLANTS – NEWTON, WELLESELY, MA

30 November 2016

Are dental implants made from ceramics ready to consider as a viable alternative to metal?

Since their introduction over 40 years ago, dental implants have become an established treatment modality that had revolutionized the concept of replacing missing teeth. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been considered a pioneer in computer-assisted implant dentistry. His first implant case was in 1988. According to Dr. Johnson, “The recent material of choice for manufacturing dental implants is commercially pure titanium, because of its excellent biocompatibilty and mechanical properties However, the gray colour of the titanium may be disadvantageous and give rise to esthetic problems, especially if the soft tissue situation is not optimal and the dark colour shines through the thin peri-implant mucosa. The profession has been looking for options to address this concern. Some implant companies are wrapping a pink material along the collar of the implant while others are developing ceramic implants.”

Zirconia ceramics (yttrium-stabilized tetragonal poly-crystals) seem to be a suitable material for dental implants because of their tooth-like colour, their excellent mechanical properties and their good biocompatibility. They have extensively been used as ball heads in total hip replacements with remarkable clinical outcomes. Recent animal studies have also shown successful bone healing of dental zirconia implants under both unloaded and loaded conditions. Dr. Johnson has been using zirconia to fabricate his dental crowns for many years without outstanding success. As the conventional fabrication of zirconia rods usually results in realtively smooth surfaces, only few studies have investigated rough surface modifications of zirconia implants. This is a critical aspect, since it has been already demonstrated that surface roughness and topography also influence osseointegration of zirconia implants.

A recent study by Rita Depprich, et al, in Head and Face Medicine, looks at the comparison of titanium and zirconia implants on pigs and concludes that, “zirconia implants with modified surfaces display features of osseointegration similar to those of titanium implants. These results are promising for using zirconia implants for dental applications in the future”.

“It’s still early in the game” according to Dr. Johnson, “but it may be available in the next few years after clinical trials are complete. Until then, titanium implants are sill the gold standard. ”

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Original article: https://head-face-med.biomedcentral.com
Artwork: www.southerdentalimplant.com


E-CIGARETTES AS BAD THE REAL ONES? – NEWTON, WELLESELY, MA

18 November 2016

Former and would-be smokers who opt for electronic cigarettes may not be doing their teeth a whole lot of good, according to a new study. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been educating his patients on the harmful effects of smoking on dental tissues for 30 years. “Many have shifted toward the e-cigarettes thinking that they are a ‘safe’ alternative but new evidence suggests that both may increase the likelihood of gum disease”.

However, research published in the journal Oncotarget, which focuses on cancer-related issues, suggests that electronic cigarette smoke may wreak the same type of havoc on teeth and gums that conventional tobacco does. A team of scientists from the University of Rochester and Stony Brook University found that the vapors released in e-cigarettes can cause tissue inflammation and damage comparable to that produces by regular ones.

Furthermore, chemicals used to flavor some e-cigs may cause even more harm to mouth tissue, the researchers say.

Some caveats: This particular experiment was conducted on gum tissue, not live human participants. It’s possible that there are other confounding factors that may contribute to gum disease and in e-cig and regular cigarette users alike.

But it’s the latest example of scientific skepticism surrounding the health benefits of e-cigarettes. Manufacturers claim that they are an obviously superior alternative to conventional products that contain known carcinogens; but the overall public health ramifications of the products remain unclear, including whether or not they may actually be encouraging more kids to smoke.

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Original article: http://fortune.com/2016/11/17/e-cigarettes-yellow-teeth-study/
Artwork: www.motherjones.com


DR. JOHNSON DISCUSSES COMPUTERS IN DENTISTRY

4 November 2016

Watch as Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners discusses the increased use of computers in dentistry…click on the link below to download the video:

Comcast Ryne Computer


ALL-ON-FOUR DENTAL IMPLANTS – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

3 November 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners recently participated in the American College of Prosthodontics annual meeting in San Diego where he discussed the All-on-4® treatment concept. It provides edentulous and soon-to-be edentulous patients with an efficient and effective restoration using four dental implants to support an immediately-delivered full-arch prosthesis. Dr. Johnson has been called a pioneer in the synergistic use of computers in implant dentistry. His first case, using a CT scan generated model was performed in 1988.

After the first dental implant patient was treated in the 1980s, a discussion began around the optimal number of implants needed to anchor a fixed dental prosthesis in edentulous patients. Some clinicians tended to install as many implants as possible, often one per tooth. Others argued that biomechanically, only four or even three were needed. Only long-term clinical data could provide answers.

At the forefront

The records of the early patients of P-I Brånemark allowed for an early retrospective study. After a 10-year observation period, the survival rates were demonstrated to be the same for restorations with four and six implants assuming that the bone levels and distribution of implants were ideal. The challenge of advanced resorption remained, however. Because it is not possible in many cases to insert distal implants without grafting and/or nerve lateralization, the concept of tilting the two distal implants was introduced.

Immediate results

In 2003, the concept of immediate loading (placing a dental prosthesis on implants the same day the implants are placed) of four implants in edentulous lower—and soon after also upper—jaws with two tilted distal implants. This one-stage procedure substantially reduced the costly and time-consuming bone grafting procedures, number of surgeries and healing time.

The success continues

In an early reported a cumulative survival rate of 96.7% for implants and 100% for prostheses at up to 3-year follow up.2 Since then, he and others have repeatedly reproduced high survival rates for both upper and lower jaws. Today, the All-on-4® treatment concept is used around the world with similar high survival rates and patient satisfaction that is enhanced by limited costs.

Dr. Johnson, with his in-office periodontist, has done hundreds of implant cases with outstanding results. To arrange a consultation with Dr. Johnson, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

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Original article and artwork: www.nobelbiocare.com


DENTAL IMPLANTS & MEDICATIONS – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

27 October 2016

Each year, about 500,000 North Americans get dental implants. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, considered by many as a pioneer in the synergistic use of computers in implant dentistry says, “If you are one of them, and are preparing to have a dental implant, it might be a good idea to start taking beta blockers, medication that controls high blood pressure, for a while. And to stop taking heartburn pills”.

A body of research indicates that in order to raise the odds that dental implants will attach properly, there are clear benefits to taking certain common medications and avoiding others.

Bone cell growth, healing and death

“The success of procedures like dental implants depends mainly on how the existing bone accepts the implants to create a connection between the living bone and the surface of the implant,” says Dr. Johnson, who has been involved in implant dentistry since 1988. “Because some medications affect bone metabolism and the way that bone cells heal and multiply or die, they can have an important effect on the success of implants.”

A McGill research team reviewed data about the integration of dental implants gathered from over 700 patients. They then confirmed the results they saw in human patients through studies in rats.

Implications for hip and knee replacements

“We believe that this research may have implications for orthopedic interventions such as hip and knee replacements, because the same mechanisms of bone cell growth break down, and healing take place in all the bones in the body,” says one of the researchers. “Our work with implants in rats suggest that this is indeed the case, but further research will be needed to confirm it.”

Drugs that aid integration of implants – Beta blockers

  • Conclusions are based on 1499 dental implants in 728 patients between Jan. 2007 — Sept. 2013 at the East Coast Oral Surgery in Moncton, New Brunswick
  • 327 implants were in 142 people who took beta blockers for hypertension
  • 1172 implants were in 586 people who didn’t take beta blockers
  • Failure rates of implants for people using beta blockers was 0.6%
  • Failure rates of implants in people who don’t take beta blockers was 4.1%
  • More than 640 million patients around the world take beta blockers to control hypertension.

“We carried out this study because we knew that beta blockers have been reported to increase bone formation,” says Prof. Tamimi from McGill’s Faculty of Dentistry. “So we thought it was possible that they would also decrease the risk of failure of dental implants. However we didn’t expect that there would be such a clear difference in the failure rates for implants between users and non-users of beta blockers. Randomized clinical trials will need to be carried out as well as other studies of large numbers of patients to investigate this phenomenon in more depth.”

Drugs that impede integration of dental implants – Heartburn treatment

  • Conclusions are based on 1773 dental implants in 799 patients between Jan. 2007 — Sept. 2015 at the East Coast Oral Surgery in Moncton, New Brunswick
  • 133 implants were in 58 people who took heartburn medication
  • 1640 implants were in 741 people who don’t take heartburn medication
  • Failure rates of implants for people using heartburn medication were 6.8%
  • Failure rates of implants for people not taking heartburn medication were 3.2%
  • More than 20 million Americans, about one in 14 people, take heartburn medication.
  • Heartburn medication is rapidly becoming the third most prescribed pharmaceutical product worldwide, especially for elderly people, who take it either on an occasional or long-term basis.

“Scientists already knew that drugs for heartburn reduce calcium absorption in bones and generally increase the risk of bone fractures,” says Dr. Tamimi, of McGill’s Faculty of Dentistry. “That is why we wanted to look at how it affects the integration of implants and bone healing after this type of surgery. But we didn’t expect to find that the negative effects of these type of drugs would be as great as they are. Further work will need to be done to find the appropriate dosages and time periods that people should take or avoid these medications.”

For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here

To learn more about Dental Implants, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Original article: www.eurekalert.org

Artwork: www.medicalxpress.com


DENTAL IMPLANTS FAILURES – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

19 October 2016

Dental implants are now used widely around the globe. However, questions about patient risk assessment prior to placing the implants still abound. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners asks, “What causes implants to fail in some patients but not others?

There are several factors which negatively influence implant predictability:

1. Gum and Bone Disease: The placement of implants in a patient with periodontal disease would be one relevant concern. Researchers from Sweden performed a systematic review to determine if persons with periodontitis are more susceptible to peri-implantitis. The conclusion was that an increased susceptibility for periodontitis may also confer an increased risk for implant loss, loss of supporting bone, and postoperative infection.
2. Smoking: A recently published study discussed the effectiveness of implant treatment in a large patient population nine years after treatment. They used a large and randomly selected patient sample, and concluded that patient characteristics and implant features affect results. They discovered that smokers and patients with an initial diagnosis of periodontitis were at higher risk of implant loss. A 2014 study confirmed that placement of implants in smokers pointedly affected implant failure rates, the risk of postoperative infections, and marginal bone loss.
3. Short Implants: Those with implants shorter than 6 mm and implants using particular brands of products also showed increased risk.
4. Teeth Grinding: Several studies have clearly demonstrated an increased failure rate on patient with nocturnal bruxism. The off-axis forces delivered to implants in people who grind their teeth can be significant and will over-stress the bone.

Dr. Johnson is considered a pioneer in the synergistic use of computers in dental implant dentistry and performed his first implant reconstruction in 1988.

For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here
For more information on dental implants, Contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Original article in www.dentistryiq.com,
Artwork: www.pintrest.com, www.implantninja.com, www.slideshare.com, www.ceraroot.com


DENTAL IMPLANTS, A PATIENT’S PRIMER – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

14 October 2016

Dental implants have become ‘mainstream’ as a treatment option for many patients. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been doing implant supported reconstructions since 1988 and has been regarded as a pioneer in the synergistic use of CT Scans, CAD/CAMs and state of the art dental material science to deliver outstanding results. He wants people to have some perspective on the process:

Before the procedure

Dental implants require a strong jaw bone. Patients who have lost a lot of jawbone may need to have a bone graft procedure performed before this procedure. Dr. Johnson will identify the available bone…sometimes with a CT Scan if necessary. In some instances, this can be done BEFORE any teeth are removed (implants may be placed the same day) or AFTER the area has healed from tooth removal (with adequate bone preservation techniques employed at the time of extraction).

You will receive instructions about how to prepare for the day of the procedure. It is highly recommended you quit smoking several months before the procedure as smoking can cause poor osseointegration (poor bone and implant integration), which is the leading cause of implant failure.

Anesthetic

The procedure starts with a local anesthetic. This will make the implant site and the area around it completely numb. You will be awake, but you won’t be able to feel any pain in that area. You might still feel pressure, vibrations, or some other sensations that might be uncomfortable, but no pain. Some offices offer conscious sedation or partial sedation where you are awake and numb, but “out of it” and mostly unaware of what is going on. Some people describe the feeling as similar to being drunk. Partial sedation is usually more expensive than local anesthetic and is not available at every office.

A dentist applies local anesthetic to a patient’s lower jaw. A numbing gel is usually applied so that the patient will not feel the injection.

Preparing the implant site

After the anesthetic has taken effect, the implant site will be prepared and the gums will be retracted so the dentist can access the jawbone and evaluate the implant site. The bone needs to be relatively flat and smooth, and the dentist might use a drill to reshape it.

Drilling the pilot hole

The dentist will then use a series of drills to make a hole in the jawbone for the implant (s)…sometimes a “placement jig” will be fabricated from the CT Scan work up. They will first create a divot using a small round bur, and then a pilot drill to create a pilot hole. They may use a plastic jig prepared from plaster casts to help guide the pilot drill, but this is mostly up to the dentist if they need one. They may also use an alignment pin to make sure the pilot hole is on target. If no adjustments are needed, the pilot hole will be drilled deeper. As the hole is being created, the dentist may flush the area with water or saline to keep the bone cool and prevent overheating caused by drilling. Once the pilot hole is finished they will check its alignment again using the alignment pin. If the positioning of the implant is close to other anatomical structures, such as nerves or blood vessels, they may take an x-ray with the alignment pin in place to check its position.

Finishing the hole

When the pilot hole is finished, the dentist will use a series of increasingly larger drill bits until it’s the correct diameter for the implant. The size of the implant will have been chosen ahead of time based on the condition of the bone.Usually, your dentist will want to select the largest implant that your bone can sustain because larger implants distribute their load to the bone better than smaller implants do. Most are about 4 mm in diameter.

After the hole for the implant is finished, the alignment will be checked again using the pin. Then the whole will be threaded using a screw tap to match the threads on the implant. Some implants are self-tapping and don’t require this step. Dental implants are roughly the size of the root of a normal tooth.

Placing the implant

Finally, the implant will be placed. This can be done using a special head for the dental drill or using a small hand wrench. Sometimes it is actually done using a small torque wrench. This can cause some unpleasant sensations but skilled surgeons are able to minimize the discomfort. The surgical site will be closed using an implant cap and stitches.

Healing and osseointegration

The stitches will be left in place for 7 to 10 days, after which they will be removed. In some cases, the gum flaps may be stitched so that they cover the implant cap as the site heals and the gum tissue will later be trimmed back when the abutment is placed. The implant will be given 3 to 6 months to osseointegrate (fuse with the bone) before the restoration (consisting of the abutment and crown) is placed.

Note: It is extremely important that you keep the implant area and surrounding teeth clean. Peri-implantitis is a condition that is caused by bacteria infecting the area surrounding an implant and can cause bone loss and implant failure due to poor osseointegration. Some clinics offer “immediate load” implants where a temporary restoration is placed the same day as the implant. This restoration will be removed in the future and a permanent one placed. Not every patient is a candidate for immediate load implants; this is an option you should discuss with your dentist. The treatment will be completed on a second trip, after osseointegration is complete and the abutment and prosthesis is custom-made. Dental implants are made up of three parts; the implant (screw), the abutment (stump), and the crown (tooth).

Final/Definitive restoration

After the implant has healed and is stable, the definitive restoration can be placed. This can consist of a crown, bridge, or denture. The implant cap (think ‘manhole cover’) is removed and replaced with an abutment and the dental prosthesis is placed on top of it. For most conventional implants, this is a crown that either screws on to the abutment or is cemented in place. Removable restorations like dentures may have clips or snaps of some kind.

After the procedure

Most patients are extremely satisfied after dental implants. After the implant is placed, your dentist will advise you to stick to chewing soft foods while the implant osseointegrates. Immediate load implants will also need time to osseointegrate, and your dentist will tell you when the temporary parts of the implant need to be replaced with a permanent restoration. Patients who have had dental implant surgery say that the pain is mostly a dull ache in their jaw after the anesthetic wears off and it is gone completely within a week. After the final restoration is complete, though, patients are able to treat the prosthetic like a normal tooth and can hardly tell the difference. They look, feel, and can be used just like normal teeth.

For more blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here
For more information on dental implants or to arrange a consultation, contact Newton Wellesely Dental Partners.

Original article: www.medigo.com


DENTAL IMPLANTS: YOU HAVE OPTIONS – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

13 October 2016

If you’re missing a tooth, Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners wants you to know, “you’ve got several options. The least advisable is to do nothing! It’s not just about aesthetics…Replacing a lost tooth is important to restoring maximum function, maintaining the alignment of surrounding teeth, and preserving facial contours”. Dr. Johnson has been involved in implant dentistry since 1988 and is regarded as a pioneer in the synergistic use of CT Scans, CAD/CAM and placement ‘jigs’ to create implant supported reconstructions with stunning results.

Your pearly whites don’t just look pretty, they are important place holders for each other. Over time, those adjacent to a toothless gap can drift to fill the space and move out of alignment. Additionally, tooth roots below the gums provide stimulation that the underlying jawbone needs to maintain its form and density.

Following are common approaches to replacing a lost tooth. The most appropriate for you will depend on a variety of factors that you should discuss with your dentist.

Dental Implants

Today’s gold standard for tooth replacement is the dental implant. This is actually a tooth root replacement to which a separately fashioned crown is attached. For successful implantation, there must be a sufficient amount of healthy jawbone to anchor the implant and the adjacent gums and teeth must be healthy. Certain systemic health conditions may preclude implantation as well.

PROS: Aesthetic, functional, reliable Stimulates the jaw bone to remodel and rebuild Does not compromise the integrity of adjacent teeth Decreased risk of periodontal (gum) disease compared with a bridge

CONS More expensive than a bridge (but more durable so it could be more cost effective long term) Requires minor surgery and healing time before placement of a permanent crown

Bridges

Prior to implants, the three-unit fixed partial denture (FPD), or fixed bridge, was the standard approach for tooth replacement. In this scenario, the two teeth on either side of the gap (the “abutment” teeth) are crowned and the crowns support a “pontic” — a false tooth — between them like pickets in a fence.

PROS: Provides normal function and aesthetics Less wait time than with implants Less expensive than implants

CONS: Damage to abutting teeth (must be shaped to accommodate the crown) Greater susceptibility to tooth decay Jawbone beneath the ‘fake tooth’ may deteriorate over time

Removable Partial Denture (RPD)

A removable denture is made of an artificial tooth anchored in plastic that mimics gum tissue. It is attached to metal clasps that hook onto adjacent natural teeth. It can be removed for cleaning.

PROS: Aesthetic, functional Least expensive option

CONS: Greater susceptibility for periodontal (gum) disease and tooth decay Usually results in teeth becoming loose May have stability and comfort issues May not fit right over time Jawbone underneath may deteriorate over time

For more information on your options for replacing missing teeth, contact Newton Wellesely Dental Partners.

For more information and access to additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here

original article: www.deardoctor.com
artwork: www.samdental.com, www.dentalcrest.com


DENTAL IMPLANTS – ALL ON FOUR – WELLESLEY, NEWTON, MA

11 October 2016

Those who have missing teeth — or are soon to have their last, failing teeth removed — have several options for tooth replacement. One of the most advanced and reliable techniques is to permanently attach lifelike prosthetic (new replacement) teeth to dental implants that are anchored in the jawbone.

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, is recognized as a pioneer in dental implants and placed his first implant prosthesis in 1989. Since that time, he has honed his approach to develop a computerized technique, incorporating CT scan coupled with CAD/CAM technology. This synergistic effort offers immediate results with incredible precision.

Implant-supported teeth look and function just like real teeth, and are maintained with the same oral hygiene practices, such as brushing and flossing. They provide important health benefits (described is this article). And while dental implants are relatively expensive, a newer procedure that also provides functional teeth on the same day implant surgery is performed has brought the cost down and put this beneficial technology within the reach of many.

Implant-supported teeth allow normal function of the whole stomatognathic system (“stomato” – mouth; “gnathic” – jaws) including the nerves, muscles and jaw joints. By permanently replacing missing teeth — and lost gum tissues — dental implants restore the support of the facial structures (cheeks and lips), thereby creating a more youthful appearance as well as the ability to function normally. This includes chewing tough foods, eating fresh fruits and vegetables, laughing, kissing, speaking confidently, and smiling with joy.

Dental Implants: State-of-the-art Tooth Replacement Systems

It is not an overstatement to say that permanent tooth replacement with implants has revolutionized dentistry. Implants have particularly transformed the lives of people who are edentulous (completely toothless) by giving them a solution that is a lot more comfortable, secure, and reliable than removable dentures. They also prevent the loss of jawbone density and volume that is inevitable when teeth are lost. Dental implants stabilize and stimulate the bone around them, maintaining bone dimension and strength. This is something removable dentures can’t do. In fact, wearing dentures actually accelerates bone loss.

A dental implant is a small, screw-shaped post that replaces the root of a missing tooth — the part that is housed in the bone beneath the gum. Implants are made of titanium, which has a unique ability to fuse to bone in a process called osseo-integration (“osseo” – bone; “integration” – to join with or fuse to). That’s what makes them so sturdy and reliable.

After implants are inserted into the jawbone during a well-tolerated surgical procedure, fixed bridges can be attached to them immediately that look and function like real teeth. This can be accomplished in one or both jaws in the same day.

All For One — And One “Four” All

Today’s state-of-the-art implant systems enable a minimum number of implants to support a maximum number of teeth. That means as few as four implants can be used to support a full arch (upper or lower jaw) of fixed, non-removable replacement teeth. And this remarkable life-changing event can be accomplished in a single day!

Success will depend on some crucial steps:

This person had no upper teeth and wore an old denture that fit poorly.
An implant-supported fixed denture replaced the upper teeth, re-establishing the smile as well as the ability to eat.
  • When the implants are placed in the jawbone, they must remain completely immobile to allow the process of osseo-integration to occur. Any force that causes even minute movement of the implants in the early healing phase can ruin the integration process, resulting in implant failure. That’s why a soft diet (no hard, crunchy or tough foods) during the first 6-8 weeks is essential.
  • The implants themselves must be strategically placed to offer the most effective support. By rigidly connecting the new teeth to the implants, they stabilize each other. Think of this arrangement like a tabletop or chair supported by four legs — which are sometimes angled outward for maximum support.

This process is not only the most efficient way to replace all the teeth, but also the most cost-effective strategy for implant-supported tooth replacement. Individual implants to replace each tooth are impractical and not recommended. Given that there are usually 28 functional teeth (excluding wisdom teeth), replacing teeth individually can be vastly more expensive and may not offer any better results.

For more information on dental implants in Newton and Wellesely, MA, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

For additional blogs by Dr. Johnson, click here

Original article: http://www.deardoctor.com/


THE LATEST ON TEETH WHITENING

28 September 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners was recently interviewed for a national magazine that was developing a synopsis of cosmetic dental procedures. According to Dr. Johnson, “Tooth whitening has become one of the most frequently requested dental procedures in his office. The public has come to demand whiter, more perfect smiles and in response many choices for tooth whitening have been made available. These include home-based products such as toothpastes, gels, and films, as well as in-office based systems where products containing highly concentrated bleaching agents are applied under professional supervision”. The profession and public have been aware of certain risks related to tooth whitening such as increased tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation. New research has shown that there are other risks such as tooth surface roughening and softening, increased potential for demineralization, degradation of dental restorations, and unacceptable color change of dental restorations. The new research is also focused on optimizing whitening procedures to reduce tooth sensitivity and to increase the persistence of the whitening.

Types of Teeth Whitening Systems

Whitening systems can be variously categorized. The following approach is in accordance with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry.

Whitening Toothpastes

Whitening toothpastes typically contain higher amounts of abrasives and detergents than standard toothpastes, to remove tougher stains. Whitening toothpastes do not contain bleach (sodium hypochlorite) but some contain low concentrations of carbamide peroxide or hydrogen peroxide that help lighten tooth color. Whitening toothpastes typically can lighten tooth color by about one or two shades.

OTC Whitening Strips and Gels

Whitening strips were introduced into the market in the late 1980’s. They deliver a thin layer of peroxide gel on plastic strips shaped to fit onto the buccal surfaces of the teeth. There are a variety of white strip products on the market with varying instructions. A typical set of instructions are to apply the strips twice daily for 30 minutes for 14 days. Tooth lightening can be seen in several days and this method can lighten the teeth by 1 or 2 shades. There are some newer whitening strip products that require only one 30-minute application per day that have the same whitening end point as the two-a-day products.

Whitening gels are peroxide-based gels applied with a small brush directly to the surface of the teeth. Manufacturer’s instructions are usually twice a day applications for 14 days. Like the whitening strips, the teeth can usually be lightened by 1 or 2 shades.

Whitening Rinses

Whitening rinses contain oxygen sources such as hydrogen peroxide to react with the chromogens. Manufacturer’s instructions are for twice a day rinsing for 60 seconds each. It takes up to 3 months to see a 1 or 2 shade improvement in tooth color.

Tray-Based Tooth Whiteners

Tray-based tooth whitening systems are available both professionally and OTC. This method involves use of a fitted tray containing carbamide peroxide-bleaching gel worn for 2 to 4 hours a day or overnight. Usually by following the manufacturer instructions tooth whitening is noticeable in a few days, lightening the teeth by 1 or 2 shades.

In-Office Whitening

Quicker tooth lightening can be achieved through in-office whitening because the products deliver higher concentrations of peroxide than OTC. Consequently, gingival tissues are usually protected before the agent is applied. Some products claim to increase the oxidation of chromogens by exposure to heat or an intense blue light with a wave length between 480 nm and 520 nm to activate the product while on the tooth, causing the chemical reactions to proceed faster. Some professionals use laser systems to increase the rate of the chemical reactions. This use of lasers is considered to be an ‘off-label’ use of laser systems in dentistry by the US Food and Drug Administration. In a systematic review by Buchalla and Attin no added benefit from light-activated systems was found and thus the American Dental Association does not endorse such whitening systems.project5 Tooth lightening results are seen after one 30- to 60-minute treatment. More dramatic results can be obtained with several applications.

Risks associated with Tooth Whitening

Risks commonly reported with tooth whitening include increased tooth sensitivity and mild gingival irritation. The degree of these side effects is directly related to the concentration of the peroxide bleach component, duration of the treatment, and the non-bleach composition of the product used. Tooth sensitivity usually occurs at the time of treatment and can last several days; gingival irritation begins within a day of the treatment and can also last several days. There are additional risks that have been reported from in vitro studies which include tooth erosion, tooth mineral degradation, increased susceptibility to demineralization, and pulpal damage.4 The ultimate endpoint for tooth whitening is dependent upon the tooth itself, with common wisdom telling us that all treatment regimens will eventually arrive at the same whitening endpoint. This is not exactly true as some very aggressive regimens can damage the tooth through dehydration and demineralization such that the tooth temporarily appears whiter.

Dr. Ryne Johnson, who first lectured on tooth whitening procedures in 1989, has helped thousands of patients achieve a more beautiful smile, often incorporating this proven technique.

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Original article: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Artwork: www.dentalguideaustralia.com , www.askthedentist.com , www.webmd.com , www.parasomnia.tk , www.denmat.com


9 TIPS THAT WILL SAVE YOUR TEETH FROM COFFEE STAINS – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

27 September 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners wants to help you protect your teeth from permanent discoloration without giving up your caffeine addiction.

Why does coffee stain teeth?
Enamel, the hard outer coating that protects the other layers of your teeth, is covered in microscopic gaps. When food and drink particles get stuck in those gaps, it forms an extrinsic stain, which just means the outer layer of your tooth is discolored. But the longer the particles stay in the gaps, they start to affect other layers of the tooth. “The more you drink [coffee] and don’t do anything to remove it, the stain goes deeper and deeper,” says Denise Estafan, DDS, an associate professor at the New York University College of Dentistry. This is called an intrinsic stain, and it’s a lot harder to clean. Here are ways you didn’t even realize you’re staining your teeth.

Brushing: Your first plan of attack
The primary cause of a tooth stain is plaque accumulation, so brushing your teeth with whitening toothpaste and seeing your dentist for regular cleanings are the best ways to prevent ugly coffee stains. But trying these additional tricks can keep your teeth sparkling in between dentist visits. The best part? You don’t need to give up your morning pick-me-up. By the way: Are you making these tooth-brushing mistakes?

Don’t forget to floss. Seriously.
Let’s be honest: It’s hard to floss as regularly as dentists want you to. But setting aside a few minutes each day—morning or night—can make a big impact on your oral health. It gets rid of plaque generally, and plaque attracts stains. Brushing alone doesn’t remove all the bacteria in your mouth. Whatever is left over could harden and turn into tartar, which can cause infections.

Use a straw. Less liquid touches your teeth when you drink it through a straw. The smaller the straw, the better. This comes more naturally to iced coffee drinkers, but it works for hot coffee too.

Mix baking soda and hydrogen peroxide
Make your own whitening paste by mixing a small amount of baking soda with a small amount of hydrogen peroxide (this is what dentists use to clean your teeth, but you can buy it over-the-counter at drugstores). The paste should be pretty runny. If it’s too gritty, that means there’s too much baking soda, and you could scrub off your enamel. Here’s how you can whiten your teeth with natural ingredients from home.

Add milk
Estafan says that a splash of milk can make a real difference for your teeth. A study published in the International Journal of Dental Hygiene found that casein, the main protein in milk, can latch onto tannins in tea (bitter-tasting particles that leave residue on teeth) and prevent staining. In fact, Ava Chow, the lead researcher in this study, says it may work even better than whitening toothpaste. Coffee also has small amounts of tannins, so coffee drinkers can reap these dairy benefits too. For the best results, use high fat animal milk; soy milk won’t do the job.

Sip water between cups of coffee A swig of water can wash away staining liquids quickly before they start to set into your teeth. Even though science shows coffee isn’t dehydrating, this is still a great way to stay hydrated throughout the day.

Drink it quickly
Let’s say you and your coworker both grab cups of coffee when you get into the office. You drink your whole cup in five minutes, but your coworker takes his time and finishes the same amount of coffee in two hours. Lucky for you, Estafan says that your teeth will be the less-stained ones. Since your coworker exposed his teeth to the coffee for a longer period of time, his will be more stained. Wash even more particles away by following that quick cup with a glass of water. Just don’t burn yourself.

Chew sugar-free gum
Conquer coffee breath and clean your teeth at the same time. Chewing gum increases the amount of saliva in your mouth, and saliva washes away acids and plaque from your teeth. According to the American Dental Association, chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes after eating can help prevent tooth decay.

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Original Article: http://www.rd.com/health
Artwork: www.DoclandsDental.ie


8 DIRTY BATHROOM MISTAKES YOU’RE PROBABLY MAKING – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

21 September 2016

8 Dirty Bathroom Mistakes your probably making

By now, you’re probably on autopilot when it comes to your bathroom routine. But are your ingrained habits the cleanest ones? Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners want to make sure you’re not making these mistakes:

1. You don’t shut the toilet lid when you flush
In a Scrubbing Bubbles survey, 60 per cent of respondents indicated that they skip this important hygienic habit. And this is a big deal: If you leave the lid up when you flush, germy water particles (and whatever else is in the toilet) can spray across the room — up to six feet away from the toilet. This fact was first discussed in a 1975 study completed by germ expert Dr. Charles Gerba, and has been proven time and again. He and his team found that bacteria can linger in the air long enough to settle in a filthy film all around the room — so make sure everyone in your household is onboard with a lid-down flushing protocol.

2. You store your toothbrush in the medicine cabinet
You might think this a clever way to keep toilet bacteria from reaching your brush, but you could be trading one ill-advised move for another. Trapped in a cabinet or container, your brush may not be able to dry between uses, creating a welcome environment for bacteria. The American Dental Association recommends storing toothbrushes in an upright position, and not touching other brushes, to mitigate the risk of cross-contamination. And shut that toilet lid!

3. You leave your makeup and brushes out on the counter
Anything you apply to your face should be kept out of the path of toilet germs, too. Plus, if you store your makeup in your bathroom, the room’s moisture can make it even more susceptible to bacteria growth. Keep beauty supplies out of grime’s way in drawers or boxes, and clean brushes and replace makeup as necessary.

4. You use your loofah for way too long
Bacteria just loves breeding on these fluffy mesh shower staples, which are designed to hold-in soap and water to help you lather up. Toss them every three to four weeks.

5. You let your towels dry on hooks
Washing your bath towels after every three uses is a good rule of thumb, but only if you hang them spread out to dry on a towel bar. If you hang them on hooks, moisture (and any excess soap that’s collected) can stay trapped between the folds, which could lead to mildew and bacteria growth.

6. You never run the fan
If you haven’t already figured out, bathroom moisture can cause a host of yucky issues, so turn on the fan (or open a window) while you shower and for 15 to 20 minutes afterward.

7. You never clean the shower curtain
The Scrubbing Bubbles survey also revealed that 42 per cent of their respondents neglect this unassuming item. Feeling lazy about scrubbing residue away? Good news: You can often toss shower curtains in the washing machine. To keep mildew at bay for longer, pull the curtain across your tub (not scrunched to one side) between showers so it can air dry thoroughly.

8. You use your mobile phone in the bathroom
If you catch-up on Instagram or go a few rounds in Candy Crush while sitting on the toilet, consider this: Anything you take into the bathroom can get contaminated with lingering germs or faecal matter (16 per cent of mobile phones have it, according to a 2011 study). And even if you wash your hands after every bathroom break, we’re guessing you don’t also disinfect your phone…and then you put it to your face when you take a call later on. Yes, this is most definitely why you should avoid using your phone in the bathroom.

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Original article: www.housebeautiful.co.uk
Artwork: www.plus.google.com


LESS TEETH = NEED LONG-TERM CARE – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

20 September 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners asks, “Can maintaining good oral health help older adults prevent a variety of health problems and disabilities?

In a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers explored this connection. To do so, they examined longitudinal, retrospective data from the Japan Gerontological Evaluation Study (JAGES) project.

In their study, the research team examined information from more than 60,000 community-dwelling people aged 65 and older who did not meet the criteria for needing long-term care.

The participants were given questionnaires to complete. They answered a number of questions, including providing information about:

  • How many teeth they had
  • Their medical and mental health history
  • How many falls they had over the last year
  • Whether they smoked or drank alcohol
  • Their body weight
  • How well they were able to perform common activities of daily life

The researchers learned older adults who have significant tooth loss are less functional when compared with people who lose fewer teeth. The research team suggested that it is essential that older adults receive the support they need to maintain good oral health self-care practices, and that they receive adequate dental care.

As we age our ability to maintain ideal oral health is diminished and basic home care is often lacking” says Dr. Johnson, “Thus, I recommend an every-three-month regimen for my geriatric patients. We identify problems earlier and are able to maintain better gum health’ which limits tooth loss”.

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Original article: www.sciencedaily.com

Artwork: www.yourdentalcare.co.za


DENTAL DISEASE & LUNG CANCER – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

15 September 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, wants you to know that a recent study found a link between gum disease and lung cancer. According to a study published online in the Journal of Periodontology, Individuals with periodontal disease saw a 1.2-fold increase in the risk of lung cancer. Dr. Johnson states, “this data accompanies several other studies that link gum disease to increases in heart disease, joint disease and pancreatic cancer”.

One study suggests that specific oral bacteria may be involved in the development of cancer cells in the lungs. Another study indicates that successful treatment of periodontal disease may lead to a significantly reduced lung cancer risk.

The take-away… good dental health can minimize additional disease development. Thus, Dr. Johnson recommends, brushing two to three times daily, regular flossing and most importantly, routine preventative dental visits.

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Original article: Decisions in Dentistry 8/2016
Artwork: www.abcnews.go.com


COMBATING BAD BREATH – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

14 September 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, reveals best way to combat bad breath – and most people are reaching for the wrong thing. If you think mouthwash and sprays do the trick, think again – there are other measures you need to take.

Unless you exist on a diet of mouthwash and chewing gum (which, by the way, we do NOT recommend), there have probably been occasions when your breath has not been as minty fresh as it could be. Perhaps it was that ill-advised last cup of coffee . Or maybe you were a little liberal when cooking with the garlic – and who could blame you? The point is, at some point most of us have suffered bad breath paranoia.

But if your halitosis is a bit more of a persistent issue, then that can be problematic – and reaching for that mouthwash isn’t a long term solution. There are, however, a few simple changes that you can make. According to Dr. Johnson, “this is the most effective way to incorporate good oral hygiene into everyday life, and beat that bad breath.

1. Don’t just brush your teeth – brush your tongue too

We’re all familiar with the importance of brushing our teeth, but if you suffer from bad breath, your tongue may be contributing to this. “Bacteria accumulates in the back surface of your tongue and can also cause a strong odor.”

2. Be sure to drink a lot of water

“When your mouth becomes more dry you have less saliva and when you have less saliva food and bacteria tends to sit in your mouth for a much longer period of time. Staying hydrated can help with all that smelly bacteria. “But also remember there are other things beyond just being thirsty which can make your mouth dry. “For example, coffee, alcohol, smoking and even some medication can cause a dry mouth.”

3. ALWAYS brush your teeth after eating

If you think your twice daily regime is cutting it, then think again. “If food remains on your teeth because you don’t brush and you don’t floss, that food just sits in your mouth and is degraded by bacteria and you can just IMAGINE the odor that gives off. This especially applies before you go to bed. “When food just sits in your mouth in the morning, your bad breath will be far stronger than you imagined.”

And…

“If you find your breath is strong no matter what you do, if you find you’re constantly having to use mouth wash which really just camouflages bad odor you may have something else going on than poor hygiene.. “In that instance it’s really important to see your dentist.” Often, bleeding gums and bad breath can be an indicator of periodontal disease that can ultimately lead to tooth loss.

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Original article: http://www.mirror.co.uk/lifestyle/health


TEENAGERS AND DENTAL ISSUES – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

8 September 2016

The Daily Mail (9/1, Reporter) reported that a new study finds teenagers who are “night owls” are “up to four times as likely to require fillings as those who prefer an early night.” Dr. Ryne Johnson prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners suggests that, “this may stem from the teenagers neglecting to brush their teeth before falling asleep.” In addition, the study found teenagers who go to bed late are “more likely to wake up later and skip breakfast,” resulting in “increased snacking throughout the day.”

Given this, the Oral Health Foundation is “encouraging parents to ensure their children understand the importance of brushing their teeth before bed, and the impact of tooth decay.” Dr. Nigel Carter, the foundation’s chief executive, said the combined effect of not brushing teeth regularly before bed and skipping breakfast is “a real recipe for disaster” for oral health and increases the “risk of developing tooth decay.” Dr. Johnson reminds all that, “Problems in the mouth can affect the way our children communicate, their relationships and their wider general health, so it is vital they prioritize their oral health.”

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artwork: www.verywell.com
original article: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health


DIABETES…ITS IMPACT ON DENTAL HEALTH – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

25 August 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners wants you to know that, “if you have diabetes, you know the disease can harm your eyes, nerves, kidneys, heart and other important systems in the body. Did you know it can also cause problems in your mouth? People with diabetes have a higher than normal risk of periodontal diseases”.

Periodontal diseases are infections of the gum and bone that hold the teeth in place. In advanced stages, they lead to painful chewing problems and even tooth loss. Like any infection, gum disease can make it hard to keep your blood sugar under control.

What Is the Link Between Diabetes and Periodontal Disease?

Diabetic Control. Like other complications of diabetes, gum disease is linked to diabetic control. People with poor blood sugar control get gum disease more often and more severely, and they lose more teeth than do persons with good control. In fact, people whose diabetes is well controlled have no more periodontal disease than persons without diabetes. Children with IDDM (insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus) are also at risk for gum problems. Good diabetic control is the best protection against periodontal disease.

Studies show that controlling blood sugar levels lowers the risk of some complications of diabetes, such as eye and heart disease and nerve damage. Scientists believe many complications, including gum disease, can be prevented with good diabetic control.

Blood Vessel Changes. Thickening of blood vessels is a complication of diabetes that may increase risk for gum disease. Blood vessels deliver oxygen and nourishment to body tissues, including the mouth, and carry away the tissues’ waste products. Diabetes causes blood vessels to thicken, which slows the flow of nutrients and the removal of harmful wastes. This can weaken the resistance of gum and bone tissue to infection.

Bacteria. Many kinds of bacteria (germs) thrive on sugars, including glucose — the sugar linked to diabetes. When diabetes is poorly controlled, high glucose levels in mouth fluids may help germs grow and set the stage for gum disease.

Smoking. The harmful effects of smoking, particularly heart disease and cancer, are well known. Studies show that smoking also increases the chances of developing gum disease. In fact, smokers are five times more likely than nonsmokers to have gum disease. For smokers with diabetes, the risk is even greater. If you are a smoker with diabetes, age 45 or older, you are 20 times more likely than a person without these risk factors to get severe gum disease.

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Original article at http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/periodontal-disease

Original artwork: www.deltadentalco.com


TONGUE SCRAPING AND ORAL HEALTH – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

10 August 2016

It’s been hammered into our heads to brush twice a day, floss once (though that’s up for debate) and maybe rinse with a fluoride mouthwash. Dr. Ryne Johnson, managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners suggests that, “in addition to your current dental routine: tongue scraping should be considered”. But is this ayurvedic practice that dates back to ancient India really worth your while?

Dr. Johnson, recommends the practice to all of his patients. “Most of my clients don’t realize the effectiveness of tongue scraping until they actually do it and see all the gunk that comes off their tongue,” he says. “The tongue is the perfect breeding ground for bacteria, but although we take care of our teeth and our gums regularly, we don’t pay nearly as much attention to our tongue. The bacteria on your tongue is one of the main causes of bad breath, so scraping it regularly can significantly improve your breath over time”. In fact, a recent study showed about 85 percent of all bad breath cases begin in the mouth and half are caused by bacteria residue on the tongue. Brushing your tongue is “the best way to ensure that your breath stays fresh throughout the day,” Williamson says.

However Kimberly Harms, DDS, a spokesperson for the American Dental Association, says “your taste buds in the back are made for bacteria to hide.” And when your mouth has a lot of bacteria in it, you can taste it. “That sour taste is often due to bacteria,” she says. If you often suffer from dry mouth, this quick health routine can help that, too. “If you’re not producing enough saliva when you chew, you may have digestive issues,” Harms says. “Scraping can help.”

How to do it

“A scraper is an efficient way to remove all that’s coating your tongue,” Harms says. Here are four things to keep in mind as you scrape:

  1. Buy a dedicated tongue scraper (they cost as little as $6) that comes in plastic or metal and is usually shaped like the letter U.
  2. Always be gentle — scraping your tongue should never hurt.
  3. Scrape only five to 10 times, Harms suggests.
  4. Don’t go too deep. “Since we have a gag reflex, be sure not to put the scraper too far back in your mouth,” she adds.

“It’s a wonderful thing,” Harms says. “We don’t like to praise things without research but tongue scraping makes sense. If you’re successful at brushing twice a day and flossing daily, great. Do that first. Consider tongue scraping a great adjunct to good oral hygiene.”

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original article: www.mnn.com/health
artwork: www.wisdomsofhealth.com


BITING FORCE EXTENDS ONE’S LIFE – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

9 August 2016

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “ One’s ability to chew has a direct correlation with longevity. Many studies show that one loses 75% chewing strength wearing a denture”. The force of a man’s bite at age 70 may be a marker of his longevity, says a study in the Journal of Oral Rehabilitation.

The risk of dying before reaching their mid-80s was 84% higher in men with a weaker bite than those with a stronger bite, the study found. The association was significant even when such factors as tooth loss and severe gum disease were included in the analysis.

No connection was found between jaw strength and long-term survival in women of the same age group.

Low bite force may be a sign of poor dental work, loss of teeth and this musculoskeletal decline that can ultimately lead to disability and death, the study suggests. Low intake of vitamins, minerals and other nutrients can also affect oral health and increase people’s vulnerability to chronic disease, the researchers said.

The study, conducted in Japan, involved 559 people born in 1927, who were enrolled in a larger study in 1998. At the start of that study, the subjects underwent dental and medical examinations and reported personal information, such as diet, chewing ability and smoking habits, on surveys.

Dr. Johnson suggests that you see your dentist routinely and address factors that will influence your bite force. If you are wearing a removable prosthesis, consider implants as an adjunctive approach to improve your chewing ability…and this is likely to increase your life expectancy.

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Original article: www.wsj.com

Artwork: www.webmd.com


BANKING YOUR CHILD’S TOOTH? – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

22 July 2016

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, many people are now saving their child’s extracted teeth for stem cell preservation. While it may be a relatively new process, the development of stem cell therapy holds significant promise and banking this ‘insurance policy’ may ultimately save your child’s life or help correct a major disease later in life”.

Below are some talking points, but remember, it is important to discuss these matters with your dentist BEFORE the visit is scheduled:

What are dental pulp stem cells: Dental pulp is the soft living tissue inside a tooth. Stem cells are found inside the dental pulp. Dental pulp stem cells retain the ability to renew themselves by dividing and can change into specialized cells.

When is the best time to save stem cells: The ideal opportunity to harvest dental stem cells occurs when children and young adults are losing their deciduous (baby) teeth either thorough natural exfoliation or extraction for orthodontia. The teeth that contain the highest quantity and quality of stem cells will be those that maintain a blood supply until they are harvested.

Are these cells currently being used for treatments: Dental pulp stem cells, are being used only in laboratory settings at this time. While mesenchymal (MSC) cells are currently used in procedures such as bone marrow transplants, MSC cells from dental pulp are not yet being used for medical treatments.

What types of cells can MSC cells become?

  • Cardio Myocytes which have the potential to repair damaged cardiac tissue following a heart attack.
  • Myocytes which have the potential to repair muscle.
  • Osteocytes which have the potential to generate bone.
  • Chondrocytes which have the potential to generate cartilage.
  • Neuronal which have the potential to generate nerve and brain tissue.
  • Adipocytes which have the potential to generate fat tissue.

When were dental pulp stem cells first identified: Stem cells in dental pulp were discovered in 2000 by Dr. Songtao Shi, a dental researcher at the National Institute of Health (NIH). After verification that these cells were in fact viable stem cells, the NIH announced the discovery in 2003.

How long can stem cells be stored: We know that stem cells from the late 1980’s are still viable. In fact, most research indicates that stem cells frozen through a slow-rate process and stored with liquid nitrogen are viable for an indefinite period.

Why is dental pulp a great source of stem cells: Dental pulp stem cells can be harvested without controversy, in an inexpensive, non-invasive manner, unlike bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell collection. These methods of stem cell recovery can be both painful and expensive. Umbilical cord blood, another source of stem cells, is a once in a lifetime opportunity at birth. Umbilical cord blood stem cells recovered are typically only used in disease treatment.

How is dental pulp collected: Dental pulp collection is simple and poses no risk to the client. The tooth is either extracted or is harvested when it falls our naturally. Next a sterile transport medium is used to ship the tooth to the laboratory. The lab removes the dental pulp from tooth, processes, and then cryogenically preserves and stores the stem cells.

Why do I need my dentist to harvest the teeth: It is important to have your dentist or oral surgeon work with you to harvest a healthy tooth for preservation because with their help, you will be able to remove the tooth while a good blood supply is still present. If the tooth is allowed to fall out at home, there is less possibility of finding viable stem cells.

What happens if my child’s tooth is falling out early and my dentist has not received the kit: Detailed instructions on collecting dental pulp without a collection kit on hand are available. These instructions can be faxed or e-mailed to your dentist. In an extreme emergency the tooth may be stored in milk in your refrigerator for a BRIEF period of time.

How do you prevent the stem cells from damage during the freezing process: The laboratory’s processing technique follows the FDA guidelines of minimal manipulation. The stem cells are prepped for slow-freeze by using a cryoprotectant which prevents damage. The cryoprotectant is washed out of the stem cells in the thawing. Research has shown that this methodology is the most successful in terms of cell recovery.

How are the stem cells stored: Stem cells are stored individually in a sealed cryo-container. The cryo-container is designed specifically for long-term cryogenic storage. The container is coded and then placed in a jacketed vapor tank cooled by liquid nitrogen. This type of cooling method prevents all cross contamination.

What systems are in place to protect stem cells during long-term storage: The cryogenic facility maintains multiple levels of security. This includes back up alarm systems, 24 hour on-call staff, 24 hour temperature monitoring, and a gravity driven liquid nitrogen system which does not depend on electricity.

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Original content can be found at: http://www.toothbank.com/faq/ or http://www.ndpl.net/faqs.php
Original artwork: www.pellasmiles.com


STRESS & DENTAL IMPLICATIONS

13 July 2016

Stress can cause stomach aches, along with headaches, backaches, and insomnia. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “stress can have a significant detrimental effect on teeth as well. Bruxism (or teeth grinding) is often seen in my patients who are under stress and it can lead to TMJ issues, periodontal disease or fractured teeth”.

One study of 1,953 men and women found that those experiencing the highest levels of stress were more than three times as likely to have abdominal pain as their more relaxed counterparts. The exact connection is still unclear, but one theory holds that your intestines and your brain share nerve pathways; when your mind reacts to stress, your intestines pick up the same signal.

Because of this link, learning to manage stress with the help of a clinical psychologist, meditation, or even exercise can usually help relieve stomach troubles, too. However, if you have frequent stomach aches, see your doc to rule out food allergies, lactose intolerance, irritable bowel syndrome, or an ulcer. Dr. Johnson recommends a hard, acrylic night guard (often with a soft lining) for his patients who grind their teeth. “It is designed to spread the forces out evenly on the flat surface and the hard plastic, with the softer lining, acts as a shock absorber.”

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WAYS TO AVOID A PAINFUL DENTIST BILL

30 June 2016

A trip to the dentist can result in a big bill you hadn’t budgeted for. Or maybe things have been so tight that after you’ve paid other bills, dental care doesn’t even make the list. While cleanings, check-ups and X-rays have fairly predictable costs, any problems detected may result in significant bills.

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, Prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, here are some tips on making dental care less expensive.

1. Brush Your Teeth & Floss

This is the best — and cheapest — way to minimize your expenses. “It’s amazing how many people don’t brush and floss,” he said. “Dentists like to say, ‘Only floss the teeth you want to keep.’” Bonus: You’ll have better breath.

2. Make Checkups & X-Rays a Priority

Twice a year is a good rule of thumb, and that’s probably what insurance will pay for, if your insurance covers dental health. But you may need more or less. People who may need more include those who have a weakened immune system or gum disease, according to the Cleveland Clinic. And detection and treatment of a problem early can save you hundreds (or thousands) over waiting until it is much worse.

3. Shop Around for Braces — & Financing for Them

If your child needs braces, you have some time to check to see what your options are. Ask around about treatment plans, costs and payment plans. Practitioners may not agree on the kind of treatment or how long it will take. Be sure you understand what your choices are. Sadler said sometimes patients can get a discount by paying for the whole treatment upfront. Ask. (And if you have dental insurance, see what it covers. You may have at least some coverage.) This is also a great time to check on your credit — you may find getting a new low-interest card or using a credit card with an interest-free period to finance the braces can give you both a discount for paying upfront and allow you to repay over time. Before you apply, make sure you can qualify for a credit card by checking your credit scores.

4. Get a Second Opinion

The procedure your dentist is recommending may not be your only option. As with other types of medicine, there is sometimes disagreement on the best way to proceed. Other times, the optimal way may not be the one you choose, if you


THE LATEST IN TOOTHBRUSH TECHNOLOGY – WELLESLEY, NEWTON, MA

29 June 2016

Living in 2016 means living in a world where your smart phone, umbrella , egg tray , or tampon can sync with that miniature computer in your pocket. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, Prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Toothbrushes are no exception. We’ve seen the likes of Oral-B use smartphone apps and built-in motion sensors to (purportedly) make your cleaning more efficient, but a Chicago-based company called Onvi is taking things a step further by putting a video camera within the toothbrush itself”.

That brush, called the Prophix , can then take 10-megapixel photos and stream 1080p video of the inside of your mouth, sending it all to the requisite companion app over Bluetooth and WiFi.

Apart from giving you a very intimate view of dinner, the idea is to help you better see which spots of your clickers you might be missing on a regular basis.

As Engadget notes , the Prophix’s brush can be swapped out with three included attachments: There’s a rubber tip for your gums, a prophy cup for more involved cleaning, and a small mirror. A plaque-fighting rubber scaler will be sold separately.

Onvi aims to ship the Prophix in the first quarter of 2017. The companion app is iOS only for now, but the company says an Android version is in development.

The whole thing will set you back $400, though if you’re in the US, you can pre-order now for $100 less. Either of those seems excessive when you consider how bathroom mirrors and human eyeballs still exist. Regardless, if you’re all-in on the internet of everything, or you’re really particular about oral health, here you go.

Contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners for more information.

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Read the original article on Tech Insider.
Artwork: www.getprophix.com


MARIJUANA & GUM DISEASE – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

13 June 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners wants his patients to know that, “People who use cannabis for up to 20 years may be more likely to have periodontal disease, according to research published in June in The Journal of the American Medical Association Psychiatry”.

Using self-reported data on cannabis and tobacco use, the longitudinal study compared health outcomes in persistent cannabis users versus tobacco users and found cannabis usage associated with poorer periodontal health at age 38, and within-individual decline in periodontal health from ages 26 to 38 years. Cannabis use was not, however, found to be associated with other physical problems in early midlife, according to the open access article.

The authors conclude that the study results imply that “(1) cannabis use for up to 20 years is not associated with a specific set of physical health problems in early midlife. The sole exception is that cannabis use is associated with periodontal disease; (2) cannabis use for up to 20 years is not associated with net metabolic benefits (i.e., lower rates of metabolic syndrome); and (3) the results should be interpreted in the context of prior research showing that cannabis use is associated with accidents and injuries, bronchitis, acute cardiovascular events, and, possibly, infectious diseases and cancer, as well as poor psychosocial and mental health outcomes.”

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Original article found at, www.ada.org
Artwork: www.herbs.co


GUM DISEASE AND PANCREATIC CANCER – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

8 June 2016

Gum disease may cause more than just bad breath, according to a new study presented at the 2016 American Association for Cancer Research meeting, which points to a connection between periodontal disease as a potential early marker for pancreatic cancer. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “This could pave the way for early detection of pancreatic cancer – one of the most deadly forms of the disease –because of the advanced stage at which it is often diagnosed”.

It is estimated that in 2016, 53,070 new cases of pancreatic cancer will be diagnosed with only 7.7 percent of victims surviving 5 years. Initial findings support a hypothesis and previous research showing that people who have developed pancreatic cancer tended to have poor oral health. The researchers reasoned that periodontitis, which is inflammation of the tissue around the teeth often causing shrinkage of the gums and loosening of the teeth, is due to oral bacteria dysbiosis. Dysbiosis is a term for an unhealthy change in the normal bacterial ecology of a part of the body, such as the mouth.

Many previous studies have shown a strong relationship between associated periodontal disease with pancreatic cancer. Findings from a 2013 European prospective cohort study showed having high levels of P gingivalis antibodies in blood caused a 2-fold increase of developing pancreatic cancer. Another 2007 prospective cohort study looked at over 50,000 male health professionals with a history of periodontitis and found a 64 percent increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Both of these previous studies however, were unable to determine which came first, poor oral health or pancreatic cancer.

A new study from NYU is the first study to determine that periodontal dysbiosis does in fact precede the development of pancreatic cancer and does not develop after the diagnosis. This was determined by looking at the oral samples of saliva collected prior to the onset of pancreatic cancer confirming the positive association with P gingivalis.

Researchers pointed out that this finding does not confirm that the two periodontal disease-causing bacteria cause pancreatic cancer. Rather, they most likely correlate it with systemic inflammation occurring within the body, known to be a precursor for developing cancer. Having periodontal disease-causing bacteria in the mouth may increase the likelihood of inflammation.

Symptoms of pancreatic cancer

The pancreas is located deep within the abdomen sandwiched between the stomach and the spine, with a small portion of it nestled in the curve of the upper portion of the small intestine. It functions as a glandular organ having an essential role in converting the food we eat into fuel for the body’s cells. It has an exocrine function of secreting digestive enzymes into the small intestine helping with digestion, and an endocrine function of releasing the hormone insulin into the bloodstream, a critical controller of blood sugar levels.

Tumors of the pancreas are rarely palpable, which is why most symptoms of pancreatic cancer do not appear until the tumor has grown large enough to interfere with the functioning of the pancreas, or has spread to other nearby organs such as the stomach, liver, or gallbladder. Symptoms of pancreatic cancer may include:

  • Upper abdominal pain spreading to the back
  • Jaundice or yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes
  • Diminished appetite and unexplained weight loss
  • Fatigue
  • Digestive difficulties
  • Nausea
  • New onset of Type 2 diabetes in people over 50

Risk factors which may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer include:

  • Cigarette smoking
  • Age – over 80 percent of pancreatic cancers develop between the ages of 60 and 80
  • Race – more common in African Americans
  • Gender – more common in men
  • Religious background – more common in Ashkenazi Jews
  • Chronic pancreatitis
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Diet – diets high in meats, cholesterol, fried foods and nitrosamines
  • Family history

Future additional studies are planned to determine if periodontal disease is a cause of pancreatic cancer. Until then, good oral hygiene including regular brushing and flossing of the teeth and visits to a dentist are recommended. If a person does have periodontal disease, they should be seen regularly by a periodontist for regular cleanings and checkups to get the condition under control.

Anyone who has any of the potential symptoms of pancreatic cancer should make an appointment with their physician for an evaluation and testing as soon as possible.

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Original article: http://www.foxnews.com/health
Artwork: www.medicineworld.org


6 REASONS YOU’RE NOT WAKING REFRESHED – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

17 May 2016

6 Reasons you’re not waking up refreshed

According to an article in Prevention Magazine, here are the top 6 reasons why you may not be getting adequate REM sleep in order to wake up refreshed. According the Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “people are surprised to learn that two dentally-related items are causing them to sleep poorly”. He treats many people with simple oral appliances, worn at night, to combat bad ‘habits’ that are affecting sleep.

You grind your teeth at night

If you wake up with a headache, it’s most likely because you’ve been clenching your jaw or grinding your teeth overnight, said Kathy Gruver, PhD, a massage therapist in Santa Monica, CA. Research shows that massage can help with symptoms, so apply some gentle pressure and/or a warm, damp cloth to the jaw area right before you go to sleep and as soon as you wake up in the AM to help break the cycle. Also consider seeing your dentist for a mouth guard, which keeps your teeth from grinding down.

You have undiagnosed sleep apnea.

Half of all adult women have some type of sleep apnea, according to a 2012 study. (Women between the ages of 20 and 44 have a 25 percent chance of having sleep apnea, which also affects 56 percent of women ages 45 to 54 and 75 percent of women ages 55 to 70.) With this condition, “patients briefly stop breathing multiple times through the night, which leads to poor sleep quality,” explains Dr. Johnson. Sleep apnea is especially common in women as they go through perimenopause, when they mistakenly assume that their frequent night awakenings are a result of hot flashes. As a result, you’ll often wake up exhausted, even if you’ve theoretically gotten plenty of sleep. The best way to diagnose sleep apnea is via a sleep study—at-home devices can pick up only severe cases. Mild cases can often be treated with weight loss and alcohol avoidance before bedtime, but if you’ve got a moderate to severe case, you’ll need to use an oral appliance made by your dentist or in severe cases, a device like a CPAP, an oxygen tube under the nose that emits mild air pressure to keep the airways open.

Other reasons:

You read your Kindle before bed

You sleep in a bad position

Your pillow is of poor quality

You have a nightcap

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Original article: prevention magazine
Artwork: smileydentalgroup.com


GOLD TEETH? – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

12 May 2016

The popularity of a lily-white smile spawned a billion-dollar business for Procter & Gamble. For gold, it’s meant only more bad news.

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “When I first started in 1986 we used to do a lot of work with gold. Until a decade ago, about 67 metric tons of the yellow metal, worth $2.7 billion today, were filling, capping and crowning teeth worldwide annually. In the last five years, though, demand has plunged almost 60 percent”. The trend accelerated a decline in gold’s allure caused by newer dental cements and ceramics, and soaring bullion prices. “My patients want teeth that look radiantly NATURAL” says Dr. Johnson. “I doubt very much gold would come back into fashion.””Long ago, having a gold tooth was some kind of a status symbol. As time went by, cosmetics took over and, therefore, people began wanting to have crowns with a more tooth-like appearance.”

Used by the Etruscans to make dental bridges as early as 630 BC, gold has been featuring in people’s mouths for millennia. In ancient times, women deliberately removed one or two incisors and replaced them with golden prosthetic ones, according to Marshall Joseph Becker, an emeritus professor of anthropology at the West Chester University of Pennsylvania. Today’s dental patients prefer materials, such as ceramics, that blend, not clash, with their other teeth. And, thanks to lasers and bleach, pearly whites have seldom been whiter. P&G’s Crest Whitestrips, first sold in 2000, was “the largest product introduction in the history of” the 179-year-old multinational company, according to its lead inventor. Americans will this year spend $420.1 million on over-the-counter products to whiten their teeth, market researcher Euromonitor International predicts.

But people tend not to want to show gold, or for that matter silver, fillings these days, even though they are a very good tooth restorative. Gold in dentistry accounts for less than 1 percent of global demand. More than half is fashioned into jewelry, while a fifth is kept as bars or coins as an investment, according to gold council data.

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Original article: Chicago Tribune

Artwork: www.localdentist.pro


CANKER SORES? – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

5 May 2016

Canker sores affect millions of people. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Canker sores are an occasional nuisance; while for others, they can be a continuous source of discomfort. If you’ve ever had a canker sore, you know it hurts”.

The actual cause of these annoying mouth ulcers, technically known as aphthous stomatitis, is unknown.

However, in some people, certain factors appear to trigger the onset of a canker sore.

Mouth injury/irritation

Nutritional deficiencies

Food irritation

Toothpaste with SLS (sodium lauryl sulfate)

Stress

Treatment

There are no surefire cures currently available for canker sores; usually, you just have to let them run their course. However, there are several options for relieving canker sore pain. Consult with your dentist regarding which of the following remedies would work best for you:

  • Corticosteroids: These prescription gels or creams reduce the inflammation caused by canker sores.
  • Antibacterial mouthwashes: Only a few mouthwashes on the market have been clinically proven to reduce bacteria including, Listerine® and medicated mouthwashes that contain chlorhexidine gluconate. The latter ingredient can stain teeth, however, so use this only with the advice of your dentist or physician.
  • Pain-relieving (analgesic) gels: These contain the active ingredient benzocaine or diphenhydramine HCL to relieve pain; some even form a protective film over the canker sore. They are available over the counter. Stronger prescription analgesics are also available, especially those medications that contain 2 percent lidocaine.
  • Aphthasol: This medication, approved by the FDA, has been shown to reduce canker sore pain and shorten healing time.
  • Saltwater rinses: While questionable as an effective treatment for canker sores, rinsing with saltwater is completely safe and inexpensive, so give it a try. Just mix a teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water, and gently swish the solution in your mouth for about a minute before you spit it out.
  • Herbal “tea” rinses: Naturopathic practitioners believe sage and thyme to be natural antiseptics. This has not been proven, but these herbs are safe and inexpensive. Immerse a few spoonfuls in a cup of hot water, allow the mixture to cool to room temperature, then rinse your mouth with it for about a minute and spit it out.
  • Acemannan hydrogel patch: Reports show that this treatment reduces the healing time, as well as the pain, of canker sores. The patch, which contains a form of aloe vera, has received FDA approval and is being sold as the Carrington Patch.
  • ORA5: This is a topical antibacterial compound that uses copper sulfate and iodine to cover the irritated area, greatly reducing the pain. It is relatively inexpensive (around $6) and is available without a prescription.

Why so much pain?

A sore on your mouth’s lining reacts differently than a sore on your skin. Because your mouth is a moist environment, the sore doesn’t dry out and scab over. This causes sensitive nerve endings to constantly be exposed to friction, foods, and beverages. Most canker sores heal within two weeks. If yours takes longer than that, or if it prevents you from eating or drinking, consult with your dentist.

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Original article at massdental.org
Artwork: vividmagazine.net


ARE YOU FLOSSING?

3 May 2016

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “People can now be scientifically divided into three categories: Those who floss daily, those who never floss and those who fall somewhere in between”.

The first nationally representative analysis designed to determine how many people floss their teeth found that those who floss daily amount to 30 percent of the population. Just over 37 percent report less than daily flossing; slightly over 32 percent say they never floss.

Lead author of a study, Duong T. Nguyen, a medical epidemiologist, said the idea for the study hit him one day when he was rummaging through his house looking for dental floss. A little checking revealed that “nobody had ever looked at this before,” at least in a rigorous, scientifically valid analysis, he says.

Nguyen was in an ideal position to tackle the question. A member of the CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service (EIS) – the agency’s training program for disease detectives – he was assigned to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a representative look at the nation’s health habits based on interviews and physical examinations of 5,000 people a year. One section of the survey asked about flossing.

Done properly, flossing removes food particles that stick to teeth creating colonies of bacteria that promote inflammation and gum disease. Over time, these colonies, called plaque, harden into tarter and wear away at gums and bone, eventually causing tooth loss.

The researchers examined NHANES data from 9,056 US adults, age 30 and up, who participated from 2009 to 2012. Nguyen and his colleagues parsed their answers by age, sex, race and a ratio of family income and poverty level.

Among the findings:

  • Males (39 percent) were more like to report never flossing than females (27 percent).
  • People 75 or older (45 percent) were more likely to report never flossing than those age 30 to 44 (31 percent).
  • Non-Hispanic blacks (40 percent) and Hispanics (38 percent) were more likely to report never flossing than non-Hispanic white adults (30 percent).
  • Low-income participants (49 percent) were more likely to report never flossing than those in higher income brackets (28 percent).

Even better news is that there’s now sufficient data on flossing practices to inform discussions about prevention and education. “It’s never been looked at to this extent, it’s nice to have a study that actually looks at [flossing] and gives us a big enough sample to work with.” “What it tells me, as a medical provider, is that we need to increase education,” says author Nguyen, who reported the findings Monday in Atlanta at the agency’s 65th EIS Conference. “Something as simple as flossing is, to a lot of people, a bane,” he says. “They don’t want to do it. Yet, in the long run it can be so beneficial – it can prevent tooth loss and everything that comes with it.”

So Dr. Johnson says, “only floss the teeth you wish to keep and remember to visit your hygienist for regular cleanings; especially if you are not flossing often enough”.

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TEETH WHITENING VIDEO: WORTH WATCHING – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

27 April 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been performing tooth whitening procedures since 1986. As an early pioneer and lecturer of these techniques, he is often asked, “what is teeth bleaching and what are the different techniques used to whiten teeth”.

There are basically three modalities used in dentistry to lighten teeth: over the counter, prescription-strength material in custom trays and in-office teeth whitening. Each has its advantages and benefits. For a good overview visit: http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/w/whitening

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YOU’RE BRUSHING TOO HARD! – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

14 April 2016

8 Ways You’ve Been Brushing Your Teeth All Wrong

As far as difficult tasks go, brushing your teeth doesn’t seem like one of them. After all, you’ve been doing it since you were little (we hope). According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist & managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “it’s easier than you think to make tooth brushing mistakes, putting your oral hygiene and your smile at risk”.

You’re not brushing your teeth for long enough

The American Dental Association recommends brushing for two minutes, but many people fall woefully short—and don’t even realize it. “Different studies have timed people brushing their teeth and asked them how long they thought they did it for,” says Ed Hewlett, DDS, professor of restorative dentistry and associate dean for outreach and diversity at UCLA School of Dentistry. “Some people thought they’d brushed for a couple of minutes, but it can be less than half a minute. Our perception of how long we’re brushing is not very accurate.” To take out the guesswork, use an electric toothbrush that beeps when you’ve reached two minutes, or use a timer on your phone or an egg timer. Here are 10 secrets for keeping your teeth white and healthy.

You’re brushing too hard

If you brush your teeth like you would scour a pan with baked-on food, you’re doing more harm than good. “When you press hard against your teeth and gums, you get a satisfying sensation that you’re really getting the teeth clean,” says Dr. Hewlett. “But it’s not making your teeth cleaner, and it can do harm.” The point of brushing is to remove plaque—a bacterial film—which is sticky but also soft, so you don’t need to go to town on your teeth to remove it. “Pushing too hard can overstress the gum tissue and cause it to recede, exposing part of the tooth’s root,” says Dr. Hewlett. “That area can become sensitive to hot and cold. The root is also more susceptible to cavities than the hard enamel part of the tooth.” Try one of these home remedies for a toothache.

Your angle is off

Brushing straight across like you’re playing the violin isn’t the best way to brush your pearly whites. You want to hold the toothbrush at a 45-degree angle—upward for your top teeth and downward for your bottom teeth—so the bristles can sweep and clean under the gum line where plaque can hide. Gently brush your teeth in small circles, as if you’re drawing tiny “O’s” on them. The exception: If you have an electric sonic toothbrush, you don’t need to angle the brush to 45 degrees. “They’re designed to go straight on the tooth and you just hold it there for a few seconds,” says Sally Cram, DDS, a periodontist in Washington, D.C., and spokesperson for the American Dental Association. “You don’t have to make O’s or circles with a sonic brush.”

Your toothbrush bristles are too firm

If you’ve noticed on drug store runs that it’s getting harder to find “firm” and “medium” bristles, you’re not imagining things. Those bristles are often too harsh for your teeth and gums, so most dentists don’t recommend them. Instead, choose soft or ultra-soft bristles that can gently get down under the gum line. “Your gum is like a little turtleneck collar, and you need to get under that collar,” explains Dr. Cram. “Hard and medium brushes don’t do that and can actually abrade the gum.”

Your toothbrush head is too big

Your toothbrush should fit your mouth comfortably—and in most cases, smaller is the way to go. Unless you have a large mouth, compact brush heads do a better job of helping you access those hard-to-reach and hard-to-see molars, notes Dr. Cram.

You’ve had the same toothbrush since last year

Over time, bristles become splayed out, bent, and curved so when you angle your brush to 45 degrees, they no longer point in the right direction. The bristles become even softer and stop working as effectively. “Every three months, treat yourself to a new toothbrush,” says Dr. Hewlett.

You don’t consider flossing mandatory

That lonely container of dental floss that’s collecting dust in your medicine cabinet? You’re not alone if you’ve forgotten about it (or purposely avoid it). A 2014 Delta Dental survey found that only 41 percent of Americans manage to floss their teeth at least once a day, while 20 percent never break out the dental floss. “Brushing alone is not enough,” says Dr. Hewlett. “Toothbrushes reach a little between teeth, but they don’t remove all of the plaque there. That’s where flossing and other products come in.” Not a fan of flossing? Try an interdental cleaner, such as an electric flosser, a bristled dental pick, or wooden dental sticks, which are just as effective as flossing, according to Dr. Hewlett. “When you brush and floss together, even though it seems inconvenient or cumbersome, it’s the best return on investment because of the enormous amount of disease you can prevent,” says Hewlett.

You think it’s no big deal to skip brushing your teeth before bed now and then

Turns out, it is a big deal. Ninety-eight percent of all dental disease can be avoiding by brushing twice daily with fluoride toothpaste and flossing once per day, along with having regular check-ups with your dentist. And a study published in BMJ found a link with poor oral hygiene (read: people who rarely/never brushed their teeth) and an increased risk of developing heart disease.”Dental disease is totally preventable,” says Dr. Cram, “and a lot of it can be avoided by stepping up your home brushing program and having check-ups.”

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Original article by: Rachel Grumman Bender at www.rd.com
Artwork: www.vibrantsmilesga.com


HABITUAL TEETH GRINDER? – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

6 April 2016

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist & managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “You may have to look inward to solve the problem”. Grinding your teeth (bruxism) is widely thought of as a sleep-related disorder. Many bruxers who clench or grind their teeth during the night have other sleep disorders, such as snoring and pauses in breathing (sleep apnea).

But there could be another reason for your teeth grinding — be it during the day or night. Doctors still don’t completely understand the causes, says Mayo Clinic, but intense emotions such as anxiety, stress, anger, frustration or tension could be at the root of the problem. Meaning the more stressed you are, the more likely you are to start bruxing. “Nervous tension, anger and frustration can cause people to start showing the signs of bruxism without even knowing it,” says Dr. Johnson.

Last week, writer Hale Goetz revealed how her own anger management issues were “destroying” her teeth. During a visit to her dentist, he revealed her canines were flat and told her she would need a mouth guard if she wanted to prevent nerve damage. As a lifelong bruxer, the impact of extreme habitual grinding was “inevitable” to Goetz. When it was pointed out to her by her dentist, using a pair of false teeth to show just how out of line her jaw had been moving to flatten her teeth, she began to notice just how much of a grinder she was and how it was more extreme when she was in a state of emotional conflict.

A mouth guard is typically the first step a dentist will recommend toward preventing or correcting damage to the teeth, as it keeps the teeth separated to soften the impact of any clenching or grinding. Goetz says her mouth guard has two roles: It does its job by protecting her teeth, but also (and perhaps more importantly) it serves as a useful self-care gauge. The deeper the notches in her mouth guard, the more attention she needs to pay to her emotional well-being.

“Bruxism is often associated with anxiety and stress as are some anger management issues,” says Fredrick Wade from Addiction Medicine. “When one is treating anger management, learning stress management techniques is essential as it can be for those who suffer with bruxism.” “If stress is the cause [of bruxism], you need to find a way to relax,” says the American Dental Association. “Meditation, counseling and exercise can all help reduce stress and anxiety.”

Other self-care tips for bruxism are listening to music, taking a warm bath and exercising. Stay away from stimulating substances (including alcohol, caffeine and nicotine) in the evening, and try to say goodnight to technology at least 30 minutes before you go to bed.

Above all, don’t forget those regular dental exams. For additional dental topics by Dr. Johnson, click here. To contact him, click here.

Original article: www.sheknows.com
Artwork: www.happytoothnc.com


SMILE MAKE-OVER: NEWTON, WELLESLEY, BROOKLINE, MA

30 March 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist & managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been regarded as, “The go-to dentist for Boston’s most demanding & discriminating people” since 1986. His patient reviews offer insight into his extraordinary skills in cosmetic dentistry. He’s discussing veneers and showing before and afters of many of Hollywood’s more notable smile corrections. Is your smile ready for a makeover?

Veneers are routinely used to fix:

Teeth that are discolored — either because of root canal treatment; stains from tetracycline or other drugs, excessive fluoride or other causes; or the presence of large resin fillings that have discolored the tooth
Teeth that are worn down
Teeth that are chipped or broken
Teeth that are misaligned, uneven, or irregularly shaped (for example, have craters or bulges in them)
Teeth with gaps between them (to close the space between these teeth)

What’s the Procedure for Getting Dental Veneers?

Getting a dental veneer usually requires three trips to the dentist – one for a consultation and two to make and apply the veneers. One tooth or many teeth can simultaneously undergo the veneering process described below.

  • Diagnosis and treatment planning: This first step involves your active participation. Explain to your dentist the result that you are trying to achieve. During this appointment, your dentist will examine your teeth to make sure dental veneers are appropriate for you and discuss what the procedure will involve and some of its limitations. He or she also may take X-rays and possibly make impressions of your mouth and teeth.
  • Preparation: To prepare a tooth for a veneer, your dentist will remove about 1/2 millimeter of enamel from the tooth surface, which is an amount nearly equal to the thickness of the veneer to be added to the tooth surface. Before trimming off the enamel, you and your dentist will decide the need for a local anesthetic to numb the area. Next, your dentist will make a model or impression of your tooth. This model is sent out to a dental laboratory, which in turn constructs your veneer. It usually takes 1-2 weeks for your dentist to receive the veneers back from the laboratory. For very unsightly teeth, temporary dental veneers can be placed for an additional cost.
  • Bonding: Before the dental veneer is permanently cemented to your tooth, your dentist will temporarily place it on your tooth to examine its fit and color. He or she will repeatedly remove and trim the veneer as needed to achieve the proper fit; the veneer color can be adjusted with the shade of cement to be used. Next, to prepare your tooth to receive the veneer, your tooth will be cleaned, polished, and etched — which roughens the tooth to allow for a strong bonding process. A special cement is applied to the veneer and the veneer is then placed on your tooth. Once properly position on the tooth, your dentist will apply a special light beam to the dental veneer, which activates chemicals in the cement, causing it to harden or cure very quickly. The final steps involve removing any excess cement, evaluating your bite and making any final adjustments in the veneer as necessary. Your dentist may ask you to return for a follow-up visit in a couple of weeks to check how your gums are responding to the presence of your veneer and to once again examine the veneer’s placement.

What Are the Advantages of Dental Veneers?

Veneers offer the following advantages:

  • They provide a natural tooth appearance.
  • Gum tissue tolerates porcelain well.
  • Porcelain veneers are stain resistant.
  • The color of a porcelain veneer can be selected such that it makes dark teeth appear whiter.
  • Veneers offer a conservative approach to changing a tooth’s color and shape; veneers generally don’t require the extensive shaping prior to the procedure that crowns do, yet offer a stronger, more aesthetic alternative.

What Are the Disadvantages of Dental Veneers?

The downside to dental veneers include:

  • The process is not reversible.
  • Veneers are more costly than composite resin bonding.
  • Veneers are usually not repairable should they chip or crack.
  • Because enamel has been removed, your tooth may become more sensitive to hot and cold foods and beverages.
  • Veneers may not exactly match the color of your other teeth. Also, the veneer’s color cannot be altered once in place. If you plan on whitening your teeth, you need to do so before getting veneers.
  • Though not likely, veneers can dislodge and fall off. To minimize the chance of this occurring, do not bite your nails; chew on pencils, ice, or other hard objects; or otherwise put excessive pressure on your teeth.
  • Teeth with veneers can still experience decay, possibly necessitating full coverage of the tooth with a crown.
  • Veneers are not a good choice for individuals with unhealthy teeth (for example, those with decay or active gum disease), weakened teeth (as a result of decay, fracture, large dental fillings), or for those who have an inadequate amount of existing enamel on the tooth surface.
  • Individuals who clench and grind their teeth are poor candidates for porcelain veneers, as these activities can cause the veneers to crack or chip.

How Long Do Dental Veneers Last?

Veneers generally last between 5 and 10 years. After this time, the veneers would need to be replaced.

Do Dental Veneers Require Special Care?

Dental veneers do not require any special care. Continue to follow good oral hygiene practices, including brushing, flossing, and rinsing with an antiseptic mouthwash as you normally would.

Even though porcelain veneers resist stains, your dentist may recommend that you avoid stain-causing foods and beverages (for example, coffee, tea, or red wine).

Are There Alternatives to Dental Veneers?

Yes, alternatives to veneers include bondings and crowns. Veneers offer a nice intermediate option. Veneers may be best suited for individuals who want to change the shape of their teeth more than just a little bit — as is done with bonding — but not enough to require a crown.

For additional blogs on a variety of dental topics, click here. Or if you’d like to contact the office, click here.

original article in www.webmd.com


ANTIBIOTIC PROPHYLAXIS – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, BROOKLINE, MA

29 March 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners wants you to know that, If you have had a joint replacement and taken antibiotics before dental work in the past, you may not need to make a trip to the pharmacy before your next procedure. The American Dental Association has found it is no longer necessary for most dental patients with orthopedic implants to have antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent infection.

What Is Antibiotic Prophylaxis?

Antibiotic prophylaxis (or premedication) is simply the taking of antibiotics before some dental procedures such as teeth cleaning, tooth extractions, root canals, and deep cleaning between the tooth root and gums to prevent infection. We all have bacteria in our mouths, and a number of dental treatments—and even daily routines like chewing, brushing or flossing—can allow bacteria to enter the bloodstream (bacteremia). For most of us, this isn’t a problem. A healthy immune system prevents these bacteria from causing any harm. There is concern, however, that bacteria in the bloodstream could cause infection elsewhere in the body.

Prior to 2012, premedication prior to dental procedures was common for joint replacement patients, even though there was little evidence to support the practice and experts recommended against its practice for most dental patients. In 2012, the American Dental Association and American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons published updated guidelines, stating that dentists “might consider discontinuing the practice of routinely prescribing prophylactic antibiotics”. In January 2015, the ADA’s Council on Scientific Affairs issued another guideline, which continued to discourage prophylactic antibiotic use for most patients with prosthetic joint implants. Guidelines are re-evaluated every few years to make sure that they are based on the best scientific evidence.

Why Don’t I Need Antibiotic Prophylaxis?

Based on careful review of the scientific literature, the ADA found that dental procedures are not associated with prosthetic joint implant infections, and that antibiotics given before dental procedures do not prevent such infections.

In fact, for most people, the known risks of taking antibiotics may outweigh the uncertain benefits. Risks related to antibiotic use include nausea, upset stomach and allergic reactions, including anaphylactic shock (a severe allergic reaction that can be life threatening). Other risks include developing antibiotic resistance in bacteria, which can complicate treatment of infections such as strep throat, pink eye and meningitis; as well as increasing the risk of C. difficile infection, which causes diarrhea and other intestinal problems. Patients over 70 years old are also at increased risk of experiencing adverse reactions to some antibiotics.

Who Can Antibiotic Prophylaxis Help?

Depending on your personal medical history, you may still be a candidate for premedication. For example, antibiotic prophylaxis might be useful for patients undergoing dental procedures who also have compromised immune systems (due to, for instance, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, cancer, chemotherapy, and chronic steroid use), which increases the risk of orthopedic implant infection. It may also benefit others with heart conditions. Always talk with your dentist or physician about whether antibiotic prophylaxis before dental treatment is right for you.

For additional blogs on interesting dental topics, click: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org/blog/


YOU ASKED: SHOULD I USE MOUTHWASH? – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

24 March 2016

“Many people really enjoy the sensation of rinsing after they’re brushed,” says Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. “They feel like the mouthwash is clearing away all that loose debris.” And those people are right. Dr. Johnson says mouthwash can help you spit out loosened plaque and other bits of detritus hiding in the cracks and crevices of your mouth. But so can water, he adds.

“I like to say mouthwash is an addition to proper oral hygiene, not a substitute”. It’s not going to take the place of your morning brush or twice-yearly dentist visit, but it may help freshen your breath, and in most cases it’s not harmful, he says.

That last point may raise eyebrows among those who spotted the recent headlines connecting mouthwash to some forms of cancer and heart disease.

One recent UK study in the journal Free Radical Biology and Medicine found some mouthwashes could raise your blood pressure by wiping out a kind of helpful mouth bacteria. This bacteria helps your body generate nitric oxide, “which is known to play a critical role in protecting our cardiovascular system, including keeping blood pressure down,” says Dr. Amrita Ahluwalia, a professor of vascular pharmacology at Queen Mary University of London.

But Ahluwalia says her study focused on mouthwashes containing a strong antibacterial agent called chlorhexidine, which is usually only available by prescription in the United States. Also, hers was a very small study—just 19 people—and requires more research to support its findings.

Since the 1990s, some studies have suggested rinses that contain alcohol could contribute to the development of oral cancers. A 2014 study from Europe reinvigorated the debate. But experts say those studies are not only flawed, but also focus on excessive mouthwash use—three bouts of swishing a day or more.

Even if you’re a zealous mouth-rinser, several review studies that dug into the possible associations between alcohol rinses and cancer have failed to find links.

However, mouthwashes with alcohol can dry out your mouth, Johnson adds, so choose an alcohol-free version if dry mouth is an issue.

When it comes to antiseptic or antibacterial mouth rinses, he says, the picture is more complicated. “If you have periodontal disease or some harmful types of mouth bacteria, an antibacterial rinse could help kill the bacteria that cause the disease,” he says, but you need to speak with your dentist about the benefits and potential risks.

But for those with healthy teeth and mouths, a mild mouthwash that doesn’t contain alcohol or strong antibacterial agents is probably your best choice.

“Some rinses promote the idea that tingling or discomfort are signs the rinse is working, but that’s really just marketing,” Johnson adds. You don’t need to feel a burn when you rinse for the stuff to do its job.

And in the end, its job is mostly about making your mouth “feel” fresh. “You don’t need mouthwash, but if you enjoy it, or you have bad breath and feel it helps, then there’s no substantiated risks to rinsing once or twice a day”.

Original article: http://time.com/4267890/gingivitis-mouthwash-toothpaste/

Artwork: www.lifehacker.com.au


BIG TONSILS & SLEEP APNEA – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

16 March 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist & managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, came across a new study that found that the size of a person’s tonsils may indicate their risk for obstructive sleep apnea, a condition in which blocked upper airways cause breathing to stop and restart repeatedly during sleep. Tongue indentations, or teeth imprints on the tongue that suggest it’s too big for the mouth, may also be a sign.

More than 18 million adults in the United States are affected by OSA. Since people with the condition are often suffering from interrupted and reduced sleep, it can lead to fatigue, irritability, and trouble concentrating. In severe cases, the disorder can lead to learning and memory difficulties, heart attack, congestive heart failure, cardiac arrhythmia, stroke or depression, the National Sleep Foundation reports.

To reach their conclusions, the researchers examined 200 patients. Patients were screened for known and potential OSA risk factors including neck circumference, body weight, blood pressure and the size of their tongue, tonsils and uvula.

Of these 200 participants, researchers concluded that 23 percent were at risk for OSA, with 80 percent of those being male. Obesity, large tonsils and tongue indentations were the most common factors among people who were deemed high risk.

The findings are particularly important in the way they lend themselves to dental practice and education. While dentists won’t be able to formally diagnose OSA in patients, equipping them with the knowledge to screen for it could potentially save many cases from going undiagnosed. The University at Buffalo points out that a dentist who recognizes an enlarged tongue or tonsils can suggest a patient visit a sleep specialist. “Dentists see into their patient’s mouths more than physicians do and the signs are easy to identify.”

Dr. Johnson has been treating sleep apnea cases for many years using a SUADE appliance. For additional information or other blog topics, visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

Original article: www.Huffingtonpost.com

Artwork: www.Speechbuddy.com


FLUORIDE TREATMENT FOR ADULTS? – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

15 March 2016

If the high-pitched whir of a dentist’s drill as it bores into your molar terrifies you, good news! There could be fewer fillings in your future. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “A painless way to prevent cavities in adults is gaining traction”.

Fluoride varnish is standard practice for children’s teeth, and is generally done yearly. According to Dr. Johnson, “many of my older patients are on medications that cause dry mouth, which puts them at high risk for cavities. So for these patients, we use a skinny brush and a little pot of yellowish liquid and paints the varnish on the teeth. We know that saliva helps us wash away bacteria and food in the mouth, and the fluoride varnish will help that. Sometimes we use a tray to carry the fluoride”.

One way fluoride helps is by seeping into the enamel and drawing the calcium and phosphate that’s naturally present in the saliva. The minerals boost the teeth’s natural healing process and make them more resistant to future decay. But there are other theories about how fluoride works. It strengthens the enamel before the tooth erupts, which is why it’s so important for children. And it attacks the acid-producing bacteria in the mouth. One study shows fluoride makes it more difficult for these bacteria to stick to the teeth.

It takes about a minute, and the fluoride treatment is done. Some patients are also given a prescription for a concentrated fluoride gel that can be used at night.

“These preventative approaches work on adults just as well as they do on children,” says Norman Tinanoff, a professor of pediatric dentistry at the University of Maryland. He says part of what’s making fluoride treatments popular for adults is a move to make dental care personal, with an individual treatment plan for each patient. To do that, you have to weigh a patient’s risk of getting cavities.

One of the biggest proponents of this approach is John Featherstone, dean of the University of California, San Francisco School of Dentistry. Featherstone came up with a comprehensive way of measuring a person’s risk for caries, or tooth decay. It includes testing the level of bacteria in the mouth, and looking at dietary habits, medical conditions, medications, saliva flow and history of tooth decay. When Featherstone put his patients on personal treatment plans, he found the strategy worked.

“It really proved that drilling and filling did not fix the disease,” Featherstone says. “Putting in a filling fixes that hole in the tooth, but it doesn’t deal with the bacteria in the rest of the mouth.” Most bacteria are friendly, but a couple of bad actors can cause cavities. These guys feed on sugars and expel acid that eats away at the enamel.

Traditionally, dentists were taught that the only way to deal with decay was to drill it out. That’s still important in some cases, Featherstone says, but without fixing the underlying problem of bad bacteria, patients just keep coming back for more fillings. Featherstone saw another way. “It’s a little bit like your car is starting to rust,” he says. “If you can stop the rust before the rust goes right through the body of the car, then you’re in good shape.”

Like rust, tooth decay is a slow process. A full-on cavity is a hole that needs to be fixed. But if you catch decay early, Featherstone says, it can be reversed using fluoride treatments like varnish and concentrated toothpaste and gels.

“In the past we believed tooth decay was a rapidly progressive disease. But research shows it’s slowly progressive,” says Wendell Evans, associate professor of dentistry at the University of Sydney in Australia. He recently published a study that found using these techniques reduced the need for fillings in adults by 30 to 50 percent.

Striking as these results seem, the concept isn’t new. This shift to a preventive model of dentistry is decades in the making. “Some of the stuff in our study has been known for 50 years,” Evans says, referring to the use of fluoride treatments.

“Prevention has always been a part of the world of dentistry,” says Richard Valachovic, president of the American Dental Education Association. “What we’re seeing is a generational shift,” Valachovic says. As dentists have come to better understand the microbiology of the mouth, more effective preventive techniques have followed.

At this point, Featherstone says, two-thirds of dental schools in the U.S. teach some kind of disease management model based on a thorough risk assessment. And he expects that at some point all dentists will follow a preventive protocol. “It will happen,” Featherstone says. “It’s just a matter of time.”

If you would like additional information or to see other topic-related blogs, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Original article at: www.npr.org

Artwork: www.slideshare.net


ANTIDEPRESSANTS & DENTAL IMPLANTS

10 March 2016

For a lot of people, antidepressants are life-changing, and there’s no shame in taking them to take care of yourself. But according to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, they might have some unexpected side effects — including messing with your dental implants, new research suggests. Dr. Johnson, who has been called a pioneer in computer-assisted, implant prosthodontics wants patients to know of this correlation.

The study, to be presented at the upcoming conference for the American Association for Dental Research, included 74 participants who all received dental implants during the course of the study. All of the participants were at least 18 years old, and they’d all gotten their implants at the University of Buffalo postdoctoral dental clinic between January and August of 2014.

A dental implant is an artificial tooth that your dentist can place into your jaw if you lose a tooth to decay or injury. What’s supposed to happen is new bone forms around the implant to secure it in place.

But when the researchers went back and looked at the medical information for those 74 people, they found that those who were taking antidepressants — but not necessarily those who were currently suffering from depression symptoms — were more likely to have an implant failure than those who weren’t taking the drugs. Among those who did have implant failures, 33% of participants reported taking at least one antidepressant drug. However, among those who didn’t have any problems with their implants, only 11% took antidepressants.

It’s important to note that this is a small preliminary study, but this isn’t the first time antidepressants have been linked to problems with bones and teeth. A 2007 study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that antidepressants could speed up bone loss in older women. And way back in 2003, another study in the Journal of the American Dental Association found that many dental patients are given medications that may interfere with their antidepressants, possibly creating an environment for tooth problems. Researchers think that because these drugs often act on our serotonin receptors, which are important for both our moods and our bones, they may be doing some damage under the radar.

Still, this isn’t a reason to start skipping your much-needed meds — but it’s always a great idea to touch base with your doctor about side effects.

For more information about implants, Dr. Johnson, or other blog topics, visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

Original article: refinery29.com

Artwork: backhealthforyou.com


DRY MOUTH TREATMENT, NEWTON, MA

9 March 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners wants to educate people on what can lead to dry mouth? It’s a significant problem for many of his patients and can lead to increased dental problems if not addressed.

What Are the Symptoms of Dry Mouth?

Common symptoms include:

  • A sticky, dry feeling in the mouth
  • Frequent thirst
  • Sores in the mouth; sores or split skin at the corners of the mouth; cracked lips
  • A dry feeling in the throat
  • A burning or tingling sensation in the mouth and especially on the tongue
  • A dry, red, raw tongue
  • Problems speaking or trouble tasting, chewing, and swallowing
  • Hoarseness, dry nasal passages, sore throat
  • Bad breath

The best way to treat dry mouth

Known medically as xerostomia (zeer-o-STOE-me-uh) — depends on what’s causing it. You can do some things to relieve dry mouth temporarily. But for the best long-term dry mouth remedy, you need to address its cause.

To relieve your dry mouth:

  • Chew sugar-free gum or suck on sugar-free hard candies to stimulate the flow of saliva. For some people, xylitol, which is often found in sugar-free gum or sugar-free candies, may cause diarrhea or cramps if consumed in large amounts.
  • Limit your caffeine intake because caffeine can make your mouth drier.
  • Don’t use mouthwashes that contain alcohol because they can be drying.
  • Stop all tobacco use if you smoke or chew tobacco.
  • Sip water regularly.
  • Try over-the-counter saliva substitutes — look for products containing xylitol, such as Mouth Kote or Oasis Moisturizing Mouth Spray, or ones containing carboxymethylcellulose (kahr-bok-see-meth-ul-SEL-u-lohs) or hydroxyethyl cellulose (hi-drok-see-ETH-ul SEL-u-lohs), such as Biotene Oral Balance.
  • Try a mouthwash designed for dry mouth — especially one that contains xylitol, such as Biotene Dry Mouth Oral Rinse or ACT Total Care Dry Mouth Rinse, which also offer protection against tooth decay.
  • Avoid using over-the-counter antihistamines and decongestants because they can make your symptoms worse.
  • Breathe through your nose, not your mouth.
  • Add moisture to the air at night with a room humidifier.

Saliva is important to maintain the health of your teeth and mouth. If you frequently have a dry mouth, taking these steps to protect your oral health may also help your condition:

  • Avoid sugary or acidic foods and candies because they increase the risk of tooth decay.
  • Brush with a fluoride toothpaste. Ask your dentist if you might benefit from prescription fluoride toothpaste.
  • Use a fluoride rinse or brush-on fluoride gel before bedtime.
  • Visit your dentist at least twice yearly to detect and treat tooth decay or other dental problems.

If these steps don’t improve your dry mouth, talk to your doctor or dentist. The cause could be a medication or another condition. Medications are one of the most common causes of dry mouth. Long-term relief from your dry mouth may mean stopping or changing your medication or its dosage, or addressing underlying health issues.

Articles found at: http://www.mayoclinic.org and http://webmd.com

Artwork from: www.carifree.com


DON’T SLEEP WITH YOUR DENTURES IN PLACE!

4 March 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been regarded as one of the ‘best’ in crafting beautiful and natural looking removable dentures. He’d like to remind denture wearers of the risks of wearing their dentures during sleep.

A study from Japan looked at the associations between oral health behaviors and the rate of pneumonia in communal living situations. They evaluated oral health status and oral hygiene behaviors, as well as gave medical assessments, including blood chemistry analysis. They followed up with each patient annually until the first hospitalization or death occurred from pneumonia. This long-term study followed the seniors for three years. Among the 453 denture wearers, 41% wore their dentures while sleeping and were at higher risk for pneumonia than those who removed their dentures at night.

The study also revealed some other interesting contributing factors. Both perceived swallowing difficulties and overnight denture wearing were independently associated with approximately 2.3-fold higher risk of the incidence of pneumonia, which was comparable with the high risk attributable to cognitive impairment, history of stroke, and respiratory disease! As if that weren’t enough, the study also concluded that wearing a denture through the night increases:

  • Tongue and denture plaque and microbial bioburden
  • Oral inflammation
  • Positive culture for candida albicans
  • Levels of circulating interleukin-6 as compared to their counterparts

So what do we need to share with patients and caregivers? We need to let them know that current science has revealed that wearing the denture during sleep is associated with:

  • Oral inflammation
  • Microbial burden
  • Aspiration pneumonia

Cleaning the denture daily should be built into care plans for seniors, and all denture-wearing patients should remove them during sleep. These simple modifications could save lives.

Article seen at: www. rdhmag.com
Image from: www.deardoctor.com


YOUR COLD IS FINALLY OVER… TOSS THE TOOTHBRUSH?

25 February 2016

That nasty cold (or flu) is finally over. Do I need to toss my toothbrush?

After weeks of sniffling, coughing, sneezing, and feeling miserable, you’ve kicked that cold. There is no way you want to feel that icky again so you’ll do anything to avoid reinfecting yourself. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners asks, “Does that mean you need to toss out your toothbrush?”

Luckily, you can’t be re-infected by the same cold virus, but there are some 200 different strains circulating at any given time. “You develop antibodies for each of the viruses you are exposed to,” says Dr. Natalie Azar, medical contributor for NBC. “If you are having a cold that feels like it just doesn’t quit, it is probably a different cold virus.”

Charles Gerba, a professor of microbiology and environmental sciences at the University of Arizona, agrees. “It is hard to re-infect yourself,” he says.

After being exposed to a virus, the body creates antibodies to fight off the virus. When you recover from that particular virus, your body no longer remains susceptible to that strain. As for re-exposure, that virus on the toothbrush, lip balm, mascara, sheets, or towels won’t make you sick again. But if other viruses and bacteria linger on these items, a new illness can develop.

Flu, staph, strep, e-coli, and yeast commonly live on toothbrushes says Dr. Heather Rosen, medical director of UPMC North Huntington Urgent Care. “There are so many bacteria that can reside on a toothbrush; therefore, it is always best to get rid of it once you have been infected with some sort of viral or bacterial illness,” she says.

And, replacing your toothbrush after illness reduces the chance that your nasty brush spreads its germs to anyone else’s nearby brushes. At a minimum, Dr. Johnson recommends that you change your toothbrush every three months. Most importantly, keep it 3 feet from the toilet, because airborne droplets released from flushing settle on toothbrushes.

And, never share toothbrushes”. “You can catch infections like a cold, blood borne disease [think Hepatitis B or C], or even bacterial infections if you take a chance and use someone else’s toothbrush,” Rosen says.

For other blogs by Dr. Johnson, visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

Original article found at: www.today.com

Artwork: www.leibowitzdental.com


IDENTIFY PLAQUE WITH TOOTHPASTE?

24 February 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners asks, “Do you recall visiting the dentist as a child and popping a hot pink tablet that turned your mouth fuchsia to show plaque”?

Plaque HD Plaque-Identifying Toothpaste ups the ante with the 21st century version, a new and first-of-its kind toothpaste that contains teal disclosing agents to color and identify plaque build-up on teeth, and is proven to help consumers remove up to four times more plaque than a standard toothpaste.

Created by and for dental professionals, the benefits of Plaque HD have been clinically studied, with the results recently published in the prestigious International Journal of Dentistry and Oral Science. Participants in the independent studies conducted in the orthodontic department at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry were separated into two groups, with one group brushing with a standard toothpaste and the second group brushing with Plaque HD. The presence of plaque on tooth surfaces was visualized by plaque-bound fluorescein, photographed, and digitally quantified to calculate the percentage of remaining plaque.

Participants using Plaque HD demonstrated a 51% reduction in plaque, while participants using a standard toothpaste only demonstrated an 8.3% reduction. Since plaque is clear, the toothpaste incorporates Targetol™ Technology that contains all-natural, plant-based teal disclosing agents and colors any plaque missed so that the user must continue brushing until all the plaque has been removed, ensuring the American Dental Association’s recommended 2 minutes is met.

As demonstrated by the study, plaque can be difficult to detect with a standard toothpaste. Plaque HD helps:

  • Kids learn healthy brushing habits at a young age;
  • Teens in braces brush thoroughly and prevent the enamel damage and gum disease that’s frequently revealed when braces come off;
  • Adults combat the decaying effects of deceptively sugary and acidic raw juice diets;
  • Pregnant women who experience varying hormone levels which increases the risk for developing gingivitis and periodontitis, and who produce more plaque and need to visit their dentist for a teeth cleaning every 2 months;
  • Athletes who replenish their bodies with sport drinks for hydration and energy… and are unknowingly bathing their teeth in the sugars that fill them

For more blogs or additional information, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

Original article found at: www.prnewswire.com

Artwork from: www.acteongroup.com.au


A CANCER SCREENING FROM SALIVA?

16 February 2016

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and managing partner at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “A 10-minute cancer test which can be taken at home using just a drop of may be the wave of the future”. Scientists at California State University says it is possible to detect tumor DNA when is it circulating in bodily fluids – an approach known as a liquid biopsy. The saliva test is 100 per cent accurate and is so simple that it could be carried out at a pharmacist, the dentist or even in the privacy of someone’s own home if they were concerned.

Currently scientists can only use blood tests to detect cancer if they have already taken a biopsy and sequenced a tumor, so they know which genetic signature to look for. Although this can be used to monitor cancer spread it cannot be used for an initial test. And it can throw up false positive. Tests have shown that just a single drop of saliva contains enough data to give a definitive diagnosis as soon as a tumor develops, he said.

The test is non-invasive and cheap, costing around just $20.

It is due to enter full clinical trials in lung cancer patients later this year, and is expecting approval within two years from the Food and Drug Administration in America.

“If there is circulating signature of a tumor in a person blood or saliva, this test will find it,” research scientists told the American Association for the Advancement of Science annual meeting in Washington. “We need less than one drop of saliva and we can turn the test around in 10 minutes. It can be done in a doctor’s office while you wait.

Early detection is crucial. Any time you gain in finding out that someone has a life-threatening cancer, the sooner the better. With this capability, it can be implemented by the patient themselves in a home check, or dentist or pharmacy.” The test looks for genetic mutations in blood plasma which are consistent with a tumor.

“The advantages of this technology is that it is non-invasive. If you have a credible early screening risk assessment technology that people can use on their own or at dentists’ office or pharmacists – that’s the key, early detection.”

For more information or for other blogs of interest, visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

Original article at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk


…ALL ABOUT BAD BREATH

10 February 2016

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist & managing partner, at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners would like you to know all about BAD BREATH.

Here’s a good video to copy and paste on to your browser: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWhF0WYG7P4

What Causes Bad Breath?

There are a number of reasons you might have dragon breath. While many causes are harmless, bad breath can sometimes be a sign of something more serious.

Bacteria
Bad breath can happen anytime thanks to the hundreds of types of bad breath-causing bacteria that naturally lives in your mouth. Your mouth also acts like a natural hothouse that allows these bacteria to grow. When you eat, bacteria feed on the food left in your mouth and leaves a foul-smelling waste product behind.

Dry Mouth
Feeling parched? Your mouth might not be making enough saliva. Saliva is important because it works around the clock to wash out your mouth. If you don’t have enough, your mouth isn’t being cleaned as much as it should be. Dry mouth can be caused by certain medications, salivary gland problems or by simply breathing through your mouth.

Gum Disease
Bad breath that just won’t go away or a constant bad taste in your mouth can be a warning sign of advanced gum disease, which is caused by a sticky, cavity-causing bacteria called plaque.

Food
Garlic, onions, coffee… The list of breath-offending foods is long, and what you eat affects the air you exhale.

Smoking and Tobacco
Smoking stains your teeth, gives you bad breath and puts you at risk for a host of health problems. Tobacco reduces your ability to taste foods and irritates gum tissues. Tobacco users are more likely to suffer from gum disease. Since smoking also affects your sense of smell, smokers may not be aware of how their breath smells.

Medical Conditions
Mouth infections can cause bad breath. However, if your dentist has ruled out other causes and you brush and floss every day, your bad breath could be the result of another problem, such as a sinus condition, gastric reflux, diabetes, liver or kidney disease. In this case, see your healthcare provider.

How Can I Keep Bad Breath Away?

Brush and Floss
Brush twice a day and clean between your teeth daily with floss to get rid of all that bacteria that’s causing your bad breath.

Take Care of Your Tongue
Don’t forget about your tongue when you’re taking care of your teeth. If you stick out your tongue and look way back, you’ll see a white or brown coating. That’s where most of bad breath bacteria can be found. Use a toothbrush or a tongue scraper to clear them out.

Mouthwash
Over-the-counter mouthwashes can help kill bacteria or neutralize and temporarily mask bad breath. It’s only a temporary solution, however. The longer you wait to brush and floss away food in your mouth, the more likely your breath will offend.

Clean Your Dentures
If you wear removable dentures, take them out at night, and clean them thoroughly before using them again the next morning.

Keep That Saliva Flowing
To get more saliva moving in your mouth, try eating healthy foods that require a lot of chewing, like carrots or apples. You can also try chewing sugar-free gum or sucking on sugar-free candies. Your dentist may also recommend artificial saliva.

Quit Smoking
Giving up this dangerous habit is good for your body in many ways. Not only will you have better breath, you’ll have a better quality of life.

Visit Your Dentist Regularly
If you’re concerned about what’s causing your bad breath, make an appointment to see your dentist. Regular checkups allow your dentist to detect any problems such as gum disease or dry mouth and stop them before they become more serious. If your dentist determines your mouth is healthy, you may be referred to your primary care doctor.

For other blogs and for updated information about Dr. Johnson, visit: www.NewtonWellelseyDentalPartners.com or contact us.

Original article at mouthhealthy.org


GIVE KIDS A SMILE – DR. AMBROSE

2 February 2016

Last Friday, Dr. Christine Ambrose, Family Dentist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, had the opportunity to be a volunteer dentist with an organization called Team Smile. The organization partnered with Title I schools in the Boston metro area and transported children who needed dental care to the treatment sites.

The patient assigned to her was a six year old boy named Simon. He looked confused, scared, but curious. According to Dr. Ambrose, “When he sat down, I showed him the mirror, let him play with the gun that sprays water and air, and…the drill. I told him it was a tiny electric toothbrush that we were going to use to clean and fix the cavities in his teeth. He asked me if I was going to fix “this one” and pointed to a lower left molar that had decayed so severely his nerve was almost exposed”.

By regulations of TeamSmile, teeth that may need nerve treatment or extraction are not allowed to be treated. It was disappointing for me to tell him, “I’m sorry honey, not today.” Upon further examination I found another molar on his upper right that was in the same situation. We took x-rays and found three other smaller cavities. Due to limitations on local anesthesia, I was permitted to treat two of them. Simon was a great helper, he let us put his tooth to sleep, clean out the decay, and fill the cavities. He even taught me how to say “star” in Spanish and attempted to say “ni hau ma” in Chinese (my second language). We reminded him to brush twice a day for at least two minutes and not too many sweets. At the end, I filled out his card indicating he needed further immediate attention on the other cavity and two decayed teeth. As we said goodbye, I couldn’t help but wonder if it would ever get done.

The CDC reports that over 19 % of children ages 2-19 have untreated cavities and one of the leading causes of chronic school absenteeism is pain, trouble eating or sleeping from toothache. Among school age children, decay is the most common chronic disease, about five times more prevalent than asthma. There are easy steps you can take as a parent to make sure your children are getting adequate dental care. Take your children to the dentist by their first birthday. Teach good habits; let your children watch you brush and floss. Start using toothpaste with fluoride when your child is able to spit. Before bed, do not offer any drinks with sugar: no milk, no juice, just water. Limit juice to 4 ounces a day. Be firm about oral hygiene habits, this is not a “pick your battles” situation. At the age of 2 or 3 your child will start brushing on their own but will still need you to go back and get the areas that are hard to reach. Most children will need supervision until about the age of 6. Introduce floss early on but don’t expect your child to master it until they are 10. And lastly, remember to watch your child’s sugar intake, try to drink water instead of soda.

For other blogs, visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

www.cdc.gov
www.attendanceworks.org
http://kidshealth.org/


IS YOUR KISS READY FOR VALENTINE’S DAY?

28 January 2016

Will your kiss leaves your partner breathless (as you might hope) this Valentine’s day? Or will you be left wondering why he or she wasn’t blown away by your kiss today?

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “If you find people turning away when you greet, you may want to consider your oral hygiene and dental health. Not only is good oral hygiene vital to your kiss appeal, it’s also vital to your overall dental health; and there’s nothing worse than avoiding that kiss, whether it be a greeting or a romantic gesture, because someone has bad breath or discolored teeth”.

The cause of bad breath can stem from many causes, some of which are:

  • Poor tooth brushing technique, irregular or non-existent flossing and lack of dental health education can all lead to bad breath
  • Poor dental and oral health can lead to the build-up of bacteria in the gaps between your teeth and the crevices of your mouth which can lead onto bad breath
  • Smoking: this can lead to bad breath from tobacco derived substances which accumulate and adhere to your teeth and gums and the inside of your mouth.
  • Consuming foods such as garlic and onions can lead to strong smells and odors if not thoroughly removed and cleaned from yout teeth and inside your mouth
  • Innocuous foods such as soda and cheese can also leave you with bad breath
  • Fasting and faddy diets can result in the production of bad odours from the mouth and bad breath
  • More serious problems such as gum disease or sinus infections
  • Neglecting of overall oral healthcare

Bad breath is treatable: here are some tips on how to keep your breath fresh and your mouth healthy :

  • Reduce or cut out your intake of sugary foods and drinks (including hidden sugars in foods and drinks)
  • Brush your teeth and tongue twice daily using a fluoride toothpaste
  • Clean in- between your teeth every day using floss (or dental sticks)
  • Change your toothbrush every few months
  • Chew sugar free gum after meals
  • Visit your dentist and dental hygienist regularly

With good oral health and fresh breath, you should be confident enough to smile your way through your romantic date on Valentine’s Day!

For other dental related blogs, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

Orginal article can be found at http://www.cosmeticwhitesmiles.co.uk


ELECTRIC TOOTHBRUSH – WORTH IT?

26 January 2016

With so many electric toothbrush choices available, it can be overwhelming trying to choose the right one. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners found a review done by Faveable. “They have spent dozes of hours researching brands, scouring through reviews and testing products in order to find the best electric toothbrush on the market today”.

Although a manual toothbrush is always an option, in many cases an electric toothbrush will allow you to more effectively clean your teeth. In fact, a study that compared the effectiveness of manual and electric toothbrushes revealed that using an electric toothbrush for just three months can result in a 21 percent reduction of dental plaque and gingivitis. Electric toothbrushes also provide a wide range of brushing modes to eliminate cavities and tooth decay. They can also be great for kids and are 100% safe on braces.

# 1. Best Overall Electric Toothbrush – Oral-B Pro Smart Series 5000

Price: $124.42

The Oral-B Pro SmartSeries 5000 has earned the top spot on our list with its state of the art technology that fights plaque more effectively than other electric toothbrush models.

A unique feature of the brush is the five brushing modes – daily clean, deep clean, sensitive, massage, and polish. Another unique feature is the Bluetooth technology, which links to your smart phone, providing real-time feedback on brushing habits.

Users rave about the product’s effectiveness and the flexibility it offers. This is why we rated the Oral-B electric toothbrush the best of the best. Owners express that it offers impressive results that are similar to other products on the market at a higher price point. Even though the model comes in as the high priced on the list, users have indicated that it is well worth the cost.

#2. Best Electric Toothbrush for Kids – Philips Sonicare for Kids

Price: $39.95

The Sonicare for Kids is our top recommendation for children. It’s a great pick and comes at a reasonable price. A unique feature of this brush is that it has two brushing modes – a gentler setting for children ages 3-7 and a stronger setting for children 7 and up.

The brush also has a built in timer to ensure your child is brushing for the appropriate amount of time. It also comes equipped with a new user function that gradually increases brushing time and intensity over the first three months of use. Another positive benefit is that it helps children excited about brushing their teeth to may help motivate them to develop healthy oral hygiene habits at an early age.

# 3. Best Cheap Electric Toothbrush – Oral-B Vitality Power Brush

Price: $26

The Oral-B Vitality Power Brush is the best pick for those on a budget. Testing has shown that this model, even at just $26, is very effective at eliminating plaque and disease causing bacteria. Additionally, it uses a stain-fighting technology that has shown to help whiten your teeth.

The Oral-B Vitality also includes a two minute auto timer, allowing you to consistently hit your target brushing time. Oral-B Vitality is the most dentist-recommended electric toothbrush world wide, and the user reviews express a high level of satisfaction with the product’s features and results. Accordingly, we believe this product undoubtedly ranks as the best cheap electric toothbrush on the market.

The Sonicare for Kids also includes Bluetooth technology, which sends your child’s brushing routine directly to your Smartphone. The Philips Sonicare for Kids was clearly created for children and has several very useful features, which is why we rated it as the best electric toothbrush for kids.

# 4. Best Basic Electric Toothbrush –

Philips Sonicare Essence Rechargeable Toothbrush

Price: $123

The Philips Sonicare Essence Rechargeable Toothbrush is an effective option at an attractive price. Using this toothbrush for two minutes, twice daily, eliminates plaque and bacteria, while also effectively fighting bad breath.

The Phillips Sonicare also comes highly recommended by dentists, and customers consistently express a high level of satisfaction with the product. The battery life is also a big selling point, as the toothbrush only needs to be charged about once per week on average.

Another unique feature is the Smartimer which helps users achieve the appropriate brushing time by automatically shutting off after two minutes. Overall, it is an excellent choice for the price, so we rated it the highest in the Basic category.

# 5. Best Electric Toothbrush for Braces –

Phillips Sonicare HX9352 DiamondClean Rechargeable

Price: $189.95

Philips Sonicare DiamondClean electric toothbrush comes highly recommended by dentists. It is equipped with ultrasonic technology that allows for five distinct cleaning modes including: sensitive, massage, whitening, cleaning, and polishing. We also rated DiamondClean the top electric toothbrush for braces as it works in areas that manual brushing simply cannot reach. A unique feature of DiamondClean is that it’s equipped with a whitening option, noticeably whitening teeth in less than a week. This model comes in at the high end of the price range, but it offers a lot of unique benefits that many consider worth it.

Original article found at:

https://shopping.yahoo.com/news/the-5-best-electric-toothbrushes-224315921.html


ALZHEIMER’S AND ORAL INFECTIONS

21 January 2016

Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, and the only cause of mortality among the top 10 that cannot be prevented, cured or slowed. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “international research is being done that might suggest that there is a correlation between this very debilitating condition and oral infections”.

Two researchers from the University of Oslo and the University of Central Lancashire in Preston reviewed more than 200 papers that suggested a link between Alzheimer’s and oral infections. Their analysis, published in the Journal or Oral Microbiology, concludes that inflammation – a characteristic feature in the condition’s neuropathology – might play a key role.

They suggest that gum disease can transfer infected cells into the blood stream. If such pathogens make it to the brains of patients with genetic and environmental risk factors, the expressed microorganisms may lead to Alzheimer’s.

Addition research will continue. For other topics of interest, visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

Original article in The Journal of Multidiciplinary Care


DENTAL EXPENSES ARE DEDUCTIBLE!

19 January 2016

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Many people do not realize that one can deduct medical and dental expenses for you, your spouse and your dependents after your total medical expenses exceed 10 percent of your adjusted gross income (AGI). If you or your spouse is age 65 or older, you can deduct total medical expenses that exceed 7.5 percent of your AGI”.

Claiming the Dental Expenses deduction

To claim the medical expenses deduction, you must itemize your deductions. Itemizing requires that you not take the standard deduction, so you should only claim the medical expenses deduction if your itemized deductions are greater than your standard deduction.

If you elect to itemize, you must use IRS Form 1040 to file your taxes and attach Schedule A.

  • On Schedule A, report the total medical expenses you paid during the year on line 1 and your adjusted gross income (from line 38 of your Form 1040) on line 2.
  • Enter 10% of your adjusted gross income on line 3.
  • Enter the difference between your expenses and 10% of your adjusted gross income on line 4.
  • The resulting amount on line 4 will be subtracted from your adjusted gross income to reduce your taxable income for the year.
  • If this amount, plus any other standard deductions you claim, is less than your standard deduction, you should not itemize

Relevant information can be found at:

1. https://www.irs.gov/uac/Newsroom/Deducting-Medical-and-Dental-Expenses

2. https://www.irs.gov/taxtopics/tc502.html

For bogs regarding other dental topics, visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com


IS YOUR RESOLUTION TO HAVE A WHITER SMILE?

13 January 2016

Is your New Year’s resolution to have a whiter smile? Print this and present it for a 50% reduction in our bleaching fees.

Tooth whitening lightens teeth and helps to remove stains and discoloration. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Whitening is among the most popular cosmetic dental procedures done in my office because it can greatly improve how your teeth look rather inexpensively”.

Most dentists perform tooth whitening. Whitening is not a one-time procedure. It will need to be repeated from time to time if you want to maintain the brighter color.

What It’s Used For

The outer layer of a tooth is called the enamel. The color of natural teeth is created by the reflection and scattering of light off the enamel, combined with the color of the dentin under it. Your genes affect the thickness and smoothness of the enamel. Thinner enamel allows more of the color of the dentin to show through. Having smoother or rougher enamel also affects the reflection of light and therefore the color.

Every day, a thin coating (pellicle) forms on the enamel and picks up stains. Tooth enamel also contains pores that can hold stains.

The most common reasons for teeth to get yellow or stained are:

  • Using tobacco
  • Drinking dark-colored liquids such as coffee, cola, tea and red wine
  • Not taking good care of your teeth
  • Aging makes teeth less bright as the enamel gets thinner and the dentin becomes darker.
  • It is also possible to have stains inside the tooth. These are called intrinsic stains. For example, intrinsic stains can be caused by exposure to too much fluoride as a child while teeth are developing. Other causes include tetracycline antibiotics. They can stain a child’s teeth if taken by a mother during the second half of pregnancy or by a child who is 8 years old or younger. Teeth are still developing during these years. Trauma may also darken a tooth.

Tooth whitening is most effective on surface (extrinsic) stains.

Vital Whitening

The most common type of vital tooth whitening uses a gel that is applied directly to the tooth surface. This product contains some form of hydrogen peroxide. Tooth whitening can be done in the dentist’s office or at home. In-office whitening allows your dentist to use a more powerful whitening gel. A specialized light or laser activates the gel and allows bleaching to happen faster.

In-office whitening usually takes 30 to 90 minutes. You will need 1 to 3 appointments. The number will depend upon the method used, how severe your stains are and how white you want your teeth to be. Different types of stains respond differently to the treatment.

First, your dentist will apply a substance that covers and protects the gums around the teeth. Then, the whitening agent will be placed on the teeth.

For in-home whitening, your dentist will take impressions of your upper and lower teeth and will make custom mouthpieces to fit you. The mouthpiece needs to fit well. A close fit helps the whitening agent remain in contact with your teeth.

At home, you will fill each mouthpiece with a whitening gel your dentist provides. You will wear the mouthpiece for several hours every day. Many people achieve the amount of whitening they want within a week or two. However, you may need to wear the mouthpiece for four weeks or longer.

You also can buy whitening products over the counter. They contain a weaker whitening agent than the products you can get from your dentist. Therefore, whitening may take longer. The whitening agent is applied as a gel placed in a mouthpiece or as a strip that sticks to your teeth. Over-the-counter mouthpieces fit less securely than the kind you get from your dentist.

Whitening toothpastes are available as well. They contain abrasives that remove stains on the enamel.

Non-Vital Whitening

Vital whitening may not improve the appearance of a tooth that has had root-canal treatment because the stain is coming from the inside of the tooth. If this is the case, your dentist will use a different procedure that whitens the tooth from the inside. He or she will place a whitening agent inside the tooth and put a temporary filling over it. The tooth will be left this way for several days. You may need this done only once, or it can be repeated until the tooth reaches the desired shade.

Follow-Up

If you find that your gums are white or sore, follow up with your dentist. Whitening is not a permanent solution. The stains will come back. If you smoke or consume a lot of staining foods or drinks, you may see the whiteness start to fade in as little as one month. If you avoid these sources of staining, you may not need another whitening treatment for 6 to 12 months.

Re-whitening can be done in the dentist’s office or at home. If you have a custom-made mouthpiece and whitening agent at home, you can whiten your teeth as often as you need to. Discuss your whitening schedule with your dentist. You can talk about what whitening products would work best for you.

Risks

Whitening is unlikely to cause serious side effects, although some people’s teeth may become more sensitive for a short while. You may get mild gum irritation as well. Women should not have their teeth whitened while pregnant. The effect of the whitening materials on the development of the fetus is not known. Since the procedure is cosmetic, it should be postponed until after delivery.

For more blogs or additional information, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

Original article found at www.Colgate.com


HOW DOES YOUR SMILE COMPARE?

12 January 2016

While traveling through Asia, a colleague took this photo and commented that, “this woman really needed to see Dr. Johnson for a reconstruction”. I explained that it was not a disease process but a cultural ‘enhancement’.

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Tooth blackening was (and still is) a deliberate process. Often tour guides tell visitors that the black teeth of the older Vietnamese women were the unexpected result from the habit of chewing betel”. Indeed chewing betel does affect the coloring of the teeth but it conveys an irregular brown color instead of the lustrous black seen in Vietnamese who have had their teeth lacquered.

There are cultural reasons for tooth blackening. It was believed that only savages, wild animals and the demons of the underworld had long white teeth. In part, the original rationale for the filing and blackening of the teeth at puberty was the assurance that one would not be mistaken for an evil spirit. Even today in Hanoi, people will hold a hand in front of their mouth when speaking. Girls are taught that is sweet and polite to smile but not ladylike to laugh. These traditions may relate to the superstition that exposing the uncouth “fangs” is uncivilized savagery.

In Japan tooth blackening was known as Ohagura* and was believed to enhance sex appeal in addition to maintaining healthy teeth. Until the 12th century in Japan it was a sign of coming of age. Then it spread to the men of nobility and the samurai class. By the 18th century it was again confined to women. Then until the end of the 19th century in Japan it was used only by married women.

In 1938 a French survey found 80% of the countryside folk of Vietnam had blackened teeth. Medieval kings of Vietnam and other Southeast Asian countries blackened their teeth and wore tattoos. This clearly distinguished them from the Han Chinese occupiers who did not practice such customs. When the French came to Vietnam, they did not appreciate the implied beauty and the procedure was discouraged.

So, next time someone smiles an ‘ugly smile’, it just might be on purpose. Otherwise, have them visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com for information on what I can do to help.

Original article found in Vietnam Heritage magazine.


CAN YOU WHITEN YOUR TEETH TOO MUCH?

7 January 2016

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “The craze for whiter teeth is leading some people to overuse home bleaching kits and cause permanent tooth damage. When you’re doing it under supervision, you have someone controlling how much the bleaching progresses … if you do it yourself you can overdo it.”

Gum and tooth sensitivity are the major risks, something that can also happen with more expensive products sold by dentists since hydrogen peroxide is the active ingredient in most bleaching kits. It is available from dentists in higher concentrations than drugstore products.

There have been documented reports of serious and permanent damage to tooth enamel from over-the-counter home bleaching kits as hydrogen peroxide starts to break down proteins in the teeth after initial discoloration has been removed.

Other research concludes that enamel structure changes with exposure to bleach — whether it’s hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide, also used by dentists. This is why all whitening kits warn consumers against using them too frequently. Procter and Gamble, for instance, the maker of Crest White Strips, tells customers that more is not better. It says the product should only be used for two-week periods. Procter and Gamble said in an emailed statement that it does extensive testing on its products to determine they are safe on enamel when used as directed.

Dr. Johnson recommends against bleaching more than a few times a year and notes there is also a plateau point for every individual after which no amount of whitening will change tooth color. If overused, enamel damage will result.

Bleaching also has no effect on some dental work like crowns.

Tooth sensitivity and irritation to soft tissues can occur during bleaching treatment, but these effects are transient. Yet the effects of long-term tooth-bleaching are unknown and need to be researched, especially since the effect (of bleaching) is not permanent and many individuals end up undergoing periodic bleaching treatments,” it notes in guidelines posted on its website.

Abrasive products are also advertised as tooth whitening yet work in a different way, says Manso. Toothpaste or dental floss containing abrasives can act like sandpaper and remove tiny bits of enamel if used too long.

original article found at www.vancouversun.com


12 THINGS YOUR DENTIST KNOWS

6 January 2016

While cavities and plaque build-up may be what’s on your mind before a teeth cleaning, your dentist is looking for a whole lot more. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, Prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Diseases like cancer, anemia and diabetes will first be identified by the dentist in a regular examination, and this saves lives.” And it’s not just diseases—dentists can discover everything from your bad habits to your favorite beverages simply by asking you to say, “Ahh!”

You flossed right before your appointment—and that’s the only time. Sorry, but you can’t fool your dentist into thinking you floss daily by doing so the night before or morning of your visit. “The gums of people who only floss right before a visit are bleeding or look damaged,” says Dr. Johnson, “whereas, healthy gums are nice and tight and pink,” he says. “When patients floss right before coming for a cleaning, I can see the slices where the floss cut at the gum because they were overzealous.”

You’re pregnant. “Nearly 40% of women will develop gingivitis during their pregnancy. This is caused by increased progesterone, which facilitates the growth of bacteria, causing gingivitis. Some women will develop a deep red lump on their gums called a pregnancy tumor or pyogenic granuloma.” (This type of tumor is completely benign and will go away after the pregnancy is over.) Most women are typically pretty far along before their gums start bleeding, so it’s not as though a dentist will magically “discover” that a patient is pregnant.

You bite your nails.

Without looking at your hands, a dentist may be able to detect this habit. “Signs include chips and cracking of the teeth, plus wear and tear on the teeth from the constant stress on them. This can cause your teeth to become uneven and lead to jaw pain and discomfort. Patients that bite their nails using their front teeth usually have leveled off, flat front teeth. The nails themselves are not what cause the damage, but rather the contact that occurs between the top and bottom teeth.

You used to suck your thumb.
“Most children that suck their thumbs or a finger have no long-term effects from the habit. However, those who did so past the age of seven or eight may show significant changes to their bite or the position of their teeth. Much of that can be corrected through orthodontic treatment, but some telltale signs can remain. One can sometimes see protruding front teeth, and this can impact how kids’ jaws are coming together and growing and can also impact their speech.”

Your bad breath may mean something.
“General bad breath can be categorized as halitosis, But dentists are also trained to identify “fruity” smells and “fishy” smells, which can mean numerous things. ” ‘Fruity’ breath could indicate uncontrolled diabetes or a dietary fast that has gone too far, while ‘fishy’ breath could be a sign of kidney or liver failure. If the smell is “very foul,” it could be anything from gastroesophageal reflux(GERD) to an underlying lung abscess and bronchitis to a tonsil stone. The first thing the dentist should do is rule out the odor coming from the teeth and gums. After that, it is recommended that the patient see an ENT to rule out sinus issues, and a GI doc to rule out reflux issues.”

You may have an eating disorder.
“Many patients are surprised that their dentist is the first one to ask about eating disorders, but bulimia exhibits a very distinct pattern of tooth wear that your dentist can easily identify. This erosion happens almost exclusively on the tongue-side of the front teeth and can contribute to increased cavities. But the acid erosion on the back of a patient’s teeth does not always indicate an eating disorder. Other possibilities include acid reflux and the use of antidepressants or mood-elevating drugs, both of which reduce the amount of saliva in the mouth, thereby upping the odds of acid damage”.

You have a sinus infection.
“Often patients will call saying that they need a root canal,” explains Dr. Johnson, “when in fact it’s actually a sinus infection and not a tooth problem at all.” The reason, he explains, is because the roots of the top teeth are positioned in the same area as the floor of the sinuses. And both sinus infections and toothaches can show symptoms of pressure. “A simple home test is to have a patient bend over to touch their toes. If the pressure or pain increases just by doing this, the pain is most likely not tooth-related and he should see his ENT or primary care physician before coming to the dentist,” he advises.

You have a vitamin deficiency.

“A deficiency of vitamins and minerals can cause many oral conditions, like burning tongue syndrome, tissue sloughing off, increased infections, delayed healing, bone infections, and easy-to-bleed gums, Surprisingly, iron deficiencies show up in many ways in your mouth. It can give some patients severe sores in the corners of their mouth while others have changes in their tongues. Some may experience a painful burning sensation, or all the small papillae fall off their tongue leaving it glossy and smooth. Getting more iron will solve these problems.”

You have diabetes.
“Many times, imbalances in sugar will show a rapid change in the health of your gums, including increased swelling, bleeding, and sensitivity. In conjunction, the consistency of saliva may change, and there may be increased decay. These may all be signs of sugar levels that are out of control, so dentists can alert patients to see their doctor to check for diabetes.”

You have a drinking problem.

“Alcoholic patients are cavity-prone because alcohol tends to dry the mouth out. A dry mouth will lead to cavities, because saliva neutralizes the damage-causing acid in our mouths. In addition, alcoholics have ‘chipmunk red cheeks,’ and the smell alone is usually a giveaway.”

You have oral cancer.
“The first signs of oral cancer can be seen from the following: unexplained bleeding in the mouth, white, red, or speckled patches in the mouth, a change in the way your teeth fit together, swellings, thickenings, lumps or bumps or eroded areas on the lips, gums, or other areas inside the mouth. An oral surgeon should be consulted for a biopsy of any suspicious tissue.”

You love Gatorade.

“You may know why you chipped your tooth, but even though the cause may be apparent, there could be underlying factors that weakened the tooth and made it susceptible to being chipped in the first place. Teeth can be softened by sodas and other sugary beverages over time, which may make a tooth more susceptible to chipping. Energy drinks, which tend to be even more acidic than soft drinks, may cause even more damage to tooth enamel”.

For additional Blogs, visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

Original article found at www.mymedclinic.com


BREAST CANCER & YOUR DENTAL HEALTH

30 December 2015

Once diagnosed with breast cancer, many are just trying to cope with the preparations to get ready for treatment. Patients dread and anticipate the side effects of hair loss and nausea associated with chemotherapy. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Few people are aware of the mouth complications that can and do occur in more than one-third of those being treated for breast cancer”.

In addition to interfering with your quality of life, having any untreated mouth problems can impact on your treatment. This is just one of several reasons to see your dentist as soon as you know you will be having chemotherapy. In addition to taking care of any existing mouth conditions, the dentist can help to reduce the possible side effects that can affect your gums, teeth, your mouth lining, and your saliva glands.

When you go for a pre-treatment visit, ask your dentist to contact and speak with your oncologist about your upcoming cancer treatment. Make your oncologist aware that you are seeing a dentist, and consider your dentist a part of your care team as you will be seeing him or her during treatment, as needed, and after treatment is completed.

Each of us may experience mouth side effects differently. Some of the most common side effects make it harder to eat, to swallow, and even to talk. Many patients complain of mouth sores, and that their food has no taste. When food has no taste, it can affect the desire to eat and take in needed nourishment. Mouth pain and irritated gums also make eating and speaking difficult.

Chemo makes you more vulnerable to infection. Untreated mouth problems can lead to an infection that can delay or interrupt treatment. A dry mouth can make eating difficult and cause bad breath.

Before You Start Treatment the Dentist Will:

  • Examine your mouth and do a thorough cleaning.
  • As needed, take x-rays.
  • Fix any mouth problems
  • Spend time speaking with you and showing you how you can care for your mouth to prevent side effects or reduce the incidence of side effects once treatment starts.

Things To Do to Keep Your Mouth Healthy:

  • Drink lots of water throughout the day.
  • Chew sugar-free gum or suck on sugar-free hard candy.
  • Suck ice chips
  • Use fluoride toothpaste on an extra-soft toothbrush after every meal and at bedtime to clean your teeth, gums and tongue.
  • Use an alcohol-free mouthwash.
  • Gently floss your teeth each day. Don’t floss areas that are sore.
  • Make sure your dentures are fitting properly. Ill-fitting dentures will cause problems. Be sure to take your dentures out each night.

What to Eat and Drink with a Sore Mouth:

  • Eat small meals, several times a day, that are easy to chew and swallow.
  • Eat slow, taking small bites, and sip on liquids that will make the food go down easier.
  • Choose soft, moist foods.
  • If swallowing is a problem, cover your food with liquids such as gravy, sauces, or broths that will help with swallowing.

What Not to Eat with a Sore Mouth:

  • Foods that can irritate the gums, such as hard cookies or chips
  • Spicy foods
  • High acid fruits and juices
  • Foods that can cause cavities, such as foods heavy in sugar.
  • Alcoholic beverages

Original article seen at: About.com

Sources: National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute


DIABETES & DENTAL HEALTH

8 December 2015

Diabetes can take a toll on a person’s health in any number of ways, including vision, cardiovascular, and nerve problems — but according to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “many people don’t realize it can harm teeth, gums and bone, too. A new study highlights the risk and reveals that people with diabetes lose twice as many teeth as those without the condition”.

The study, from Duke University researchers, shows that while tooth loss has dropped overall in the U.S. over the past 40 years, people with diabetes remain much more vulnerable. African-Americans with diabetes are especially likely to lose teeth.

“They did indeed find there was a clear connection between tooth loss and diabetes, especially among African Americans,” said American Dental Association spokesperson Dr. Edmond Hewlett. He said the study sheds light on two issues that are important and timely public health concerns.

Hewlett said diabetes can put patients at more risk for gum disease and eventually tooth loss, but that it works the other way around, too. “Gum disease can also complicate diabetes and make it more difficult to manage”. Hewlett recommends people with diabetes brush twice a day, floss once a day, and visit the dentist at least twice a year.

Dr. Johnson recommends an ‘aggressive’ regimen for his diabetics patients that include using a mechanical toothbrush (Braun/Oral B or Sonicare) two or three times daily, flossing daily and a 4x/year dental-cleanings schedule. For more information visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

Original article found at CBSInteractive.com


FLUORIDATED TAP WATER WITH INFANT FORMULA?

2 December 2015

According to a literature review by Dr. Ryne Johnson, Prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, you can safely use fluoridated tap water to prepare infant formula. Exposure to fluoride during infancy helps prevent tooth decay.

However, regularly mixing powdered or liquid concentrate infant formula with fluoridated water might increase your child’s risk of developing faint white lines or streaks on the teeth (fluorosis) if these kinds of formula are your child’s main source of food.

Fluorosis is a cosmetic issue that affects both baby teeth and permanent teeth while they’re forming under the gums. In young children, combined fluoride exposure from all sources contributes to fluorosis. This includes the fluoride in fluoridated water, foods and drinks made with fluoridated water, and fluoridated toothpaste and mouth rinses — especially if these products are swallowed. Fluorosis can’t develop or worsen once permanent teeth break through the gums.

If you’re concerned about fluorosis, consider ways to minimize your baby’s exposure to fluoride. For example, you might use ready-to-feed formula, which contains little fluoride, or alternate between using fluoridated tap water and low-fluoride water — such as purified, demineralized, deionized or distilled bottled water — to prepare concentrated formula.

Remember, though, early exposure to fluoride helps prevent tooth decay. If you feed your baby only ready-to-feed formula or concentrated formula mixed with low-fluoride water, your baby’s doctor might recommend fluoride supplements beginning at 6 months. Be sure to talk to your child’s dentist or doctor about your child’s other possible exposures to fluoride first.

Original Article found at MayoClinic.org References below:

  1. Overview: Infant formula and fluorosis. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/FLUORIDATION/safety/infant_formula.htm. Accessed Oct. 27, 2015.
  2. FAQs for dental fluorosis. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. http://www.cdc.gov/FLUORIDATION/safety/dental_fluorosis.htm. Accessed Oct. 27, 2015.
  3. Fluorosis. American Dental Association. http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/f/fluorosis. Accessed Oct. 27, 2015.
  4. Fluoride supplements. American Dental Association. http://www.ada.org/en/member-center/oral-health-topics/fluoride-supplements. Accessed Oct. 27, 2015.

SLEEP APNEA – TREATMENT VIA A DENTAL APPLIANCE

13 November 2015

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners has been treating sleep apnea and finding success with something besides c-pap therapy (which involves putting a mask on overnight).

A 54 year-old patient (name withheld for HIPAA compliance), wakes up every day ready to put his life on the line as a Newton police officer, but there was something draining his energy. “I was constantly fatigued and my wife and co-workers would say, ‘Hey, you snore really loud,’” reports one of the city’s top-cops.

That snoring revealed a bigger problem: sleep apnea.

“The soft palate or the tongue will collapse and actually stop the air from moving,” explains Dr. Johnson. “picture a garden hose kinked with no flow — that’s sleep apnea.”

Dr. Johnson reports an increase in the number of sleep apnea appliances done in his practice and he’s finding success at treating it with something known as SUAD appliance.

“What they do is limit the ability for one to open typically and it gently holds the lower jaw forward in a position to get the tongue out of the airway,” says Dr. Johnson. “The small device is placed inside the mouth during sleep, which is much easier to tolerate for patients who tried the traditional and cumbersome c-pap.

“It’s night and day,” according to the patients Dr. Johnson works with on these sleep apnea appliances. For one of Newton’s ‘finest’, “I wake up in the morning. I feel refreshed. I didn’t even realize how tired I was all the time until my body adjusted to it. It literally changed my life completely.”

For additional information visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com


SMOKING A HOOKAH

29 October 2015

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2.3 million Americans smoke tobacco from pipes, and many of those who smoke waterpipes, or hookahs, believe it’s less harmful than cigarettes. However, Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental partners suggests, “hookah smoking is associated with serious oral conditions including gum diseases and cancer”.

“Waterpipe smoking is associated with serious health problems affecting the head and neck region,” said study author Teja Munshi, B.D.S., M.P.H of Rutgers University. “The public needs to know they are putting themselves at risk. They should be made aware of the dangers of smoking hookahs.”

The authors conducted a literature review that focused on waterpipe smoking and head and neck conditions. They found waterpipe smoking to be associated with gum diseases, dry socket, oral cancer and esophageal cancer among other conditions. According to the World Health Organization, smoking a hookah is the equivalent of smoking 100 cigarettes, based on the duration and number of puffs in a smoking session.

“This study sheds light on the common misconception that smoking from a waterpipe is somehow safer than smoking a cigarette,” said JADA Editor Michael Glick, D.M.D. “Whether you are smoking a cigarette, an e-cigarette, a cigar, or tobacco from a waterpipe, smoking is dangerous not only to your oral health but to your overall health.”

Millions of Americans still use traditional methods of smoking, but emerging trends in the smoking industry, such as hookah smoking and e-cigarettes pose dangers as well. E-cigarettes are devices that turn liquid into a vapor containing nicotine. In an editorial in the September 2015 issue of JADA, authors warned readers of the potential dangers of e-cigarettes, indicating that oral health effects of their use has been inadequately investigated.

Original Article found in the Journal of the American Dental Association


IS YOUR MOUTH LIKE THE SAHARA DESERT?

23 October 2015

Do you find that as you age, your body is becoming its own Sahara Desert? According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental partners, “It’s not your imagination that things are drying up — environment, hormonal changes, sun damage, certain medications all play a part”. Here’s what to expect and what to do about it:

Start with your dentist for an assessment because dry mouth can be caused by certain autoimmune diseases such as Sjogren’s syndrome, diabetes, hypertension, and rheumatoid arthritis. (A dentist can see the signs of a systemic problem in the mouth, and refer you to an appropriate physician for further testing.) “There are also hundreds of medications that cause dry mouth. If you are on one that can’t be swapped for a different, less drying one, you have to take particular care of dental health”, says Kimberly Harms, DDS, American Dental Association Consumer Advisor spokesperson.

“Saliva is extremely critical to oral health – it lubricates the teeth, so bacteria can’t stick, and has a disinfectant properties,” says Dr. Harms. If you have chronic dry mouth, “make extra sure to brush two minutes twice a day with fluoride toothpaste and floss. You may even need a prescription fluoride toothpaste. And go for regular cleanings at your dentist.”

If that doesn’t do it, try over-the-counter saliva substitutes, drink water frequently, or chew sugarless gum to stimulate saliva production (look for the ADA Seal of Acceptance). If you sleep on your back, your mouth may dry out because of mouth breathing. Get a body pillow, position yourself with your head raised a little, and use a room vaporizer.

Smoking and chewing tobacco are very drying. There’s no way around it — the only way to solve the problem is to quit. For other interesting topics, visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

Original article in Grandparents.com


BABIES & SECOND HAND SMOKE

22 October 2015

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners asks, “Want your baby to grow into a tot with a cavity-free smile? Don’t smoke when he or she is around”.

Children exposed to secondhand smoke at 4 months of age may be at risk for tooth decay by age 3, Japanese researchers report. Those children were roughly twice as likely to have cavities as kids whose parents didn’t smoke. A mother’s tobacco use during pregnancy was not a factor, the researchers added.

“Secondhand smoke is one of the major public health problems still unsolved,” said lead researcher Dr. Koji Kawakami, chairman of pharmacoepidemiology and clinical research management at Kyoto University.

Exposure to secondhand smoke is widespread, affecting four out of 10 kids around the world, he said. “In our study, more than half of children had family members who smoked, and most smokers were their fathers,” Kawakami said.

He emphasized that this study only shows an association between exposure to secondhand smoke and cavities, however, not that smoking exposure causes tooth decay. Even so, the findings support increased efforts to reduce secondhand smoke, he said.

“For example, education on the harm of secondhand smoke would increase if dentists become aware of the cavities risk due to secondhand smoke as well as tobacco smoking of their patients,” Kawakami said.

Dr. Jonathan Shenkin, a clinical associate professor of health policy, health services research and pediatric dentistry at Boston University who is a spokesman for the American Dental Association, said evidence of a link between exposure to secondhand smoke and increased risk of tooth decay has mounted over the past decade. “Like the population in this study, exposure to secondhand smoke continues to be a problem in the U.S., suggesting value in additional research,” he said.

For this study, researchers collected data on nearly 77,000 children born between 2004 and 2010. The children were examined at birth, 4, 9 and 18 months of age and at 3 years of age. In addition, their mothers completed questionnaires about smoking in the home, along with their child’s exposure to secondhand smoke, their dietary habits and dental care. About 55 percent of the parents smoked and almost 7 percent of the children were exposed to secondhand smoke, the researchers found. In all, nearly 13,000 cases of cavities were identified.

Dr. Rosie Roldan, director of the pediatric dental center at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital in Miami, said that tobacco smoke may change the saliva and other biochemistry needed to clean and protect teeth.

“Secondhand smoke puts children at risk for heart disease, breathing difficulties, and possibly for cavities,” she said.

Original Story in HealthDay


THERE ARE BOTH GOOD AND BAD CANDY OPTIONS

21 October 2015

Halloween is just around the corner, and although candy consumption is unavoidable this time of year, Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners wants to parents and children to know that there are both good and bad candy options, both of which find their way into children’s trick-or-treat bags this month.

“Of course, dentists do not advocate that children eat large amounts of sugary treats and we’d like to clarify for parents which treats are better for their kids’ teeth and which ones are likely to increase the risk of developing cavities”

Worst: Chewy/Sticky sweets, such as gummy bears, taffy and even dried fruit. According to Dr. Johnson, “because the sugar sticks to teeth for a long time, they are a serious source of tooth decay”. Also, sour candies are very acidic and can break down tooth enamel quickly.

Best: Sugar free candies (ie. Lollipops & hard candies or gum) or dark chocolate which may be good for the heart and may lower blood pressure.

Parents should review the entire ‘bag of candy’ with their children BEFORE allowing any consumption by their children. There have been instances of harmful items mixed in with candy and all ‘harmful’ candies should be rationed or removed immediately.


MORE CAVITIES SEEN IN KIDS OF CHRONICALLY STRESSED MOTHERS

22 September 2015

Dental cavities are more common among kids whose mothers suffer from chronic stress, according to a new study. A mother’s chronic stress is also associated with lower odds of breast-feeding and fewer dental visits for their children, the researchers found.

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Policy that aims to improve dental health, particularly the prevalence of cavities among children, should include interventions to improve the quality of life of mothers.” “Chronic maternal stress as a potential risk factor is something we need to consider, in addition to the wider implications of maternal well-being, social and psychological environment on dental health.” For the study, the investigators examined information on 716 U.S. mothers and their children aged 2 to 6 years. The findings showed that dental cavities were more common among kids whose mothers had two or more biological markers of chronic stress, or “wear and tear.” These markers included levels of blood fats, such as triglycerides and HDL (“good”) cholesterol; blood sugar; blood pressure; and waist circumference. After considering caregiving behaviors — including breast-feeding, eating breakfast every day and visits to the dentist — the researchers found that cavities were more common among the children who weren’t breast-fed as babies. The mothers with at least one of these biomarkers were much less likely to breast-feed, the researchers reported in the Sept. 17 issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

Income level also played a role, the findings suggested. “Our study indicated that mothers with lower income were significantly less likely to breast-feed or to have taken their child to the dentist in the prior year. They were also less likely to feed their child breakfast than higher-income counterparts,” said the research group. “It is important to better understand the dynamics of these links, so that we might develop effective public health programs and interventions.” It’s known that poverty is associated with chronic exposure to adverse living circumstances, added the study’s first author, Erin Masterson, from the Schools of Public Health and Dentistry at the University of Washington in Seattle. “These take a toll on a person biologically and also affect behavior. This study uniquely highlights the importance of considering the influence of socioeconomic status and maternal stress on children’s oral health through mothers’ struggles to adopt healthy patterns that are major predictors of dental cavities,” Masterson added in the news release. More information SOURCE: King’s College London, news release, Sept. 17, 2015


ANOTHER REASON TO QUIT SMOKING

16 September 2015

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, a collaborative practice serving discriminating patients in Brookline, Newton, Wellesley and Weston, “we now have another reason to stop smoking. Gum disease and consequential tooth loss may be the first noticeable effect on a smoker’s health”.

Individuals who smoke have a higher risk of losing their teeth than non-smokers, found new research published in the Journal of Dental Research. Researchers at the University of Birmingham and the German Institute of Human Nutrition observed that male smokers were 3.6 times more likely to lose their teeth than non-smokers, while female smokers were 2.6 times more likely.

The association between smoking and tooth loss was higher for younger people. Data also showed that heavy smokers had a higher risk of losing their teeth than those who smoked fewer cigarettes.

Using the long-term longitudinal study, EPIC (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition), researchers assessed data from 23,376 participants.

“Most teeth are lost as a result of either caries (tooth decay) or chronic periodontitis (gum disease),” lead author Thomas Dietrich, a professor at the University of Birmingham, said in a news release. “We know that smoking is a strong risk factor for periodontitis, so that may go a long way towards explaining the higher rate of tooth loss in smokers.”

The gums of a smoker may appear healthier than they actually are because smoking can mask gum bleeding, a key symptom of periodontitis. According to researchers, quitting smoking can reduce the risk of tooth loss. An ex-smoker will eventually have the same risk for tooth loss as someone who never smoked, but it could take more than 10 years, Dietrich said.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 13 percent of adults aged 65 to 74 have lost all of their natural teeth.

Original article seen on FoxNews.com


IMMEDIATE IMPLANTS CAN BE SUCCESSFUL IN POST-MENOPAUSAL WOMEN

2 September 2015

As natural as aging is, it can tend to feel like a downward spiral. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “As the years increase, bone mass and strength decrease. Teeth can fall out, and the drugs and surgery designed to return things to normal may actually make bone related issues worse”.

Osteoporosis is a common problem for women who have gone through menopause. Due to the disease, they lose bone mass and strength throughout their bodies, including their jawbone. The most common treatment today for osteoporosis is a class of drugs called bisphosphonates. But these drugs can have major complications that affect already weak bones, preventing them from getting blood and thus causing them to die. When this occurs in the jawbone, the complication is known as bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ).

The authors of an article published in the Volume 41 Special Issue of the Journal of Oral Implantology wanted to know whether a patient managing osteoporosis with bisphosphonates is at greater risk of experiencing this serious complication in the jawbone. They looked at patients who were 54 years of age or older and were receiving dental implants. The authors then compared the success of those implants in patients with and without osteoporosis.

The current study followed 24 postmenopausal women who had lost most of their teeth. Half of these patients had osteoporosis and were taking the bisphosphonate zoledronic acid once a year intravenously; the other half did not have this bone disorder and did not take the drug. Dental surgeons extracted all of the remaining teeth from each of the 24 women and immediately replaced them with dental implants. They examined them one year later to determine whether the implants were working. The results were completely successful: the researchers found that all of the implants were still in place after one year. There was some bone loss, but it was similar in both groups of patients. There were no signs of dead bone among the patients who had taken zoledronic acid.

All 24 women in the study had good contact between the surface of the implants and the bone. The authors found that installing the implants immediately after extracting the remaining teeth reduced the number of surgeries, sped up the overall process, increased patient comfort, and produced good results even in patients with osteoporosis.

The authors concluded that by inserting implants soon after removing teeth, it is possible to decrease the risk of BRONJ among patients with osteoporosis. They noted that patients taking such bisphosphonates should avoid elective oral surgery, but if it is essential, it can be successful. They recommend implant surgery immediately after tooth removal, calling it a “safe treatment modality” for patients with osteoporosis.

Full text of the article “Immediate Implant Placement in a Patient With Osteoporosis Undergoing Bisphosphonate Therapy: 1-Year Preliminary Prospective Study,” Journal of Oral Implantology, Vol. 41, Special Issue, 2015, is now available.


BAD BREATH? 10 WAYS TO FIX IT.

7 August 2015

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners finds that, “While good oral hygiene and fresh breath are important for everyone, a recent study shows that for couples, it matters a lot. In fact, 60 percent of U.S. adults with partners say that their partner’s oral health — the state of their teeth, gums and breath — plays a big role in their level of intimacy”.

While for some folks, chronic bad breath is a symptom of a larger health problem, the rest of us who simply experience a little morning dragon breath, or the occasional post-dinner stinkiness, can usually freshen things up pretty quickly.

Of course, there are scores of commercially available toothpastes, mouthwashes and dental floss we can use to keep our teeth, gums, and tongues in tip-top shape. But there are a number of other ways to make our mouths smell nice.

Here are 10 ways to improve your oral health and lessen your bad breath:

1. Brush and floss correctly.

For starters, make sure you’re nailing the basics of brushing and flossing. You don’t want bacteria, or worse, plaque and tartar in your mouth. “We tell our patients to brush two or three times a day, with a thorough brushing and flossing at least once, but preferably twice a day,” says Dr. Johnson. Though he says recommendations for each patient differ, he tells most to use a soft, ADA-approved toothbrush and toothpaste with fluoride. Mechanical brushes (Oral B or Sonicare) are good options for many people. Flossing, too, is crucial. Dr. Johnson, quips, “Only floss the teeth you wish to keep”. “A toothbrush will cover all the areas around the teeth except for where the teeth actually contact each other so you have to floss in between to break up the plaque and food debris, which can cause bad breath.

2. Use a tongue scraper.

You should scrape your tongue every day. Tongue scrapers play a role in eliminating plaque and food debris, Wall says, and can be found in most drug stores and health food stores.

3. See your dentist twice a year.

Keep up with dental cleanings and be sure to get annual X-rays of your teeth. “Bad breath can be caused by gum disease, cavities, root absorptions, and lots of other conditions that are found in the mouth,” says Dr. Johnson. “There’s no way to know what’s going on in there unless a professional looks in your mouth and takes X-rays.”

4. Drink more water.

A number of the culprits that cause bad breath can be dealt with by simply bumping up your water intake, says Dr. Gigi Meinecke, spokesperson of the Academy of General Dentistry. One is acid-reflux, which a 2012 Tufts University study suggests can be alleviated by drinking more water. Another is post-nasal drip, says Meinecke, which she says is a more common cause of halitosis than most people know. Increasing water, she says, helps loosen up secretions in the back of the throat, thereby freshening up the area. A dry mouth also contributes to bad breath. Dry mouth happens when there isn’t enough saliva in the mouth. It’s why we get morning breath. It’s especially common in people who take certain medications. “There are over 400 prescription and over-the-counter medications that list dry mouth as a side effect,” says Meinecke. Drinking more water moistens the mouth and helps things run smoothly.

5. Eat more crunchy, raw foods.

“Crunchy vegetables have a low-water content, so if you’re eating them, you have to produce more saliva in order to get it down your throat,” says Meinecke. “Increasing saliva in your mouth and having more salivary flow is good.”

6. Consider a saltwater gargle.

Meinecke says gargling with saltwater could benefit anyone who has crypts, or pockets, in their tonsil area. “Those crypts get junk in them and they get schtunky,” says Meinecke. Gargling with saltwater could help dislodge anything that’s become stuck, she says. But don’t go overboard with the salt. Use one teaspoon of salt in six ounces of water.

7. Chew gum.

Chewing sugarless gum can help freshen breath and not only because gum comes in fresh minty flavors. “Chewing gum increases salivary production,” Meinecke says, which moistens the mouth.

8. Be mindful of stinky foods.

Onions, garlic, spicy dishes — even coffee — all have smells that linger in our mouths up to 72 hours after we ingest them, experts say. If you’re going to partake, just know your mouth may let others know you have.

9. Don’t smoke!

There’s a reason they call it “smoker’s breath.” That nasty sour smell is partly from smoke particles that get stuck in the mouth, throat, and lungs after smoking cigarettes. The smell of just one cigarette can linger in your lungs for hours.

Additionally, chemicals found in tobacco add to the stink. As if that’s not enough, tobacco also dries out the mouth, which contributes to the unpleasantness.

Original article found on Today


PREGNANCY & DENTAL CARE

7 August 2015

A study published in the Journal of the American Dental Association identified no evidence to show that dental treatment with anesthetics is harmful during pregnancy.

“Yet so many pregnant women avoid going to the dentist,” said study author Aharon Hagai, D.M.D. “We aimed to determine if there was a significant risk associated with dental treatment with anesthesia and pregnancy outcomes. We did not find any such risk.”

The researchers compared the pregnancy outcomes between a group of women exposed to dental treatment with anesthetics and a control group that did not have treatment. The study shows that exposure to dental care and local anesthetics during pregnancy is not associated with increased risk for major medical problems in newborns. Examples of such diagnoses include cerebral palsy, cleft lip and heart defect. The study also compared the rate of miscarriages, premature deliveries and birth weight between the two groups, and found no reason to associate dental treatment and local anesthetics with increased risk of negative outcomes.

According to the study, previous research shows that many pregnant women do not seek dental treatment, even when a dental problem exists. A mother’s oral health during pregnancy is critical, as pregnant women may have increased risk of tooth decay because of increased carbohydrate consumption and difficulties brushing their teeth because of morning sickness, gag reflex and increased gum bleeding.

“It is a crucial period of time in a woman’s life and maintaining oral health is directly related to good overall health,” said Dr. Hagai. “Dentists and physicians should encourage pregnant women to maintain their oral health by continuing to receive routine dental care and seeking treatment when problems arise.”


YOUR MONEY & DENTAL PRODUCTS

4 August 2015

Just about everyone wastes money when it comes to purchasing and using dental products. We usually use two to three times as much toothpaste as is necessary. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “a pea size drop of toothpaste is sufficient to clean teeth and gums”.

Others suggest that you use enough toothpaste to just cover the toothbrush bristles with a thin flat layer of toothpaste. Both amounts, however, are far less than what most people use. It seems that over our lifetimes we have been conditioned into thinking that the amounts of toothpaste we see in ads is the amount needed for good oral health.

According to Dr. Johnson, “We also tend to waste money when we buy expensive toothpastes containing ingredients which we are led to believe will result in cleaner teeth. Often, however, these ingredients don’t result in cleaner teeth but just the sensation of cleaner teeth. Baking soda found in many expensive toothpastes is a prime example”. Although it may make our mouth feel clean, a Journal of the American Dental Association study revealed that baking soda is no more effective in cleaning teeth than normal toothpaste.

Another much hyped toothpaste ingredient is peroxide. Peroxide creates small bubbles in the mouth which massage the gums providing a cleaning sensation. While the bubbling action created by peroxide may provide a cleaning sensation it does little to actually clean teeth and gums. The bottom line is that when it comes to toothpaste just about any toothpaste that contains fluoride will do a good job in cleaning our teeth and gums.

Another marketing feat has been performed by our friends in the mouthwash industry. Dentists and hygienists have often questioned the claims of mouthwashes to eliminate bad breath and reduce plaque formation.

Bad breath is caused by bacteria on tooth surfaces which break down food particles left after we eat. One of the by- products of this breakdown is foul smelling sulfur particles. Most mouthwashes do not eliminate bad breath but simply mask odor – usually only very temporarily. In this respect, most conventional mouthwashes are a waste of money.

Original article in Dollar Stretcher.


GUM DISEASE & HYPERTENSION

30 July 2015

In a recent study, researchers have found that poor oral hygiene habits may lead to increased incidence of hypertension. The study, published in the July 2015 issue of the Journal of Periodontology, suggests periodontitis and hypertension may be linked by way of inflammation and blood pressure elevation.

The study assessed data collected from 19,560. Investigators evaluated the participants’ daily frequency of tooth brushing and their use of such secondary oral health products as dental floss, mouthwash, interdental brushes, and electric toothbrushes. Hypertension (also known as high blood pressure) was diagnosed in 5,921 study participants and identified by an individual’s use of antihypertensive medication or an average blood pressure greater than 140/90 mmHg. For individuals with and without periodontitis (the most severe form of gum disease), frequent tooth brushing was found to accompany a decreased prevalence of hypertension. Overall, study participants with poor oral hygiene habits were more likely to have higher hypertension frequency.

Researchers concluded that oral hygiene may be considered an independent risk factor for hypertension and that maintaining good periodontal health habits may prevent and control the condition.

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Taking care of your teeth and gums is as essential to a healthy lifestyle as diet and exercise.”

Periodontal disease (also known as gum disease) affects one of every two Americans age 30 and older. Caused by an inflammatory reaction to a bacterial infection below the gum line, periodontal disease can lead to swelling, irritation, receding gums, and tooth loss if left untreated. Dr. Johnson recommends regular flossing, brushing twice a day, and undergoing bi-yearly comprehensive periodontal evaluations for the prevention of periodontal disease, which is treatable and often reversible with proper and timely care from a periodontist.

The American Heart Association notes that 80 million American adults have been diagnosed with hypertension. Known as “the silent killer,” hypertension can lead to stroke, damage to the heart and arteries, and kidney damage.

For more information about periodontal disease, visit perio.org.


SALIVA FROM SILKWORMS?

28 July 2015

The silkworm, which produces the essential ingredient for fine silk fabric, also plays a critical role in a new process designed to provide relief for millions of individuals with dry mouth, a devastating oral and systemic health issue.

A research team from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, is the first to use silk fibers as a framework to grow stem cells into salivary gland cells. The process has been submitted for a patent.

Saliva’s role

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners tells us that, “Saliva is critical to good health. It helps with speaking, swallowing, washing food off teeth, initial food digestion and preventing oral infections. Insufficient saliva can cause chronic bad breath, cavities, gum disease, as well as systemic infections”.

There is no treatment for low-producing or nonfunctioning salivary glands, and the glands have little regenerative capability.

Low saliva production also is a devastating problem for thousands of patients who have had radiation treatment for head and neck cancer, as well as about 50 percent of older Americans whose medications can cause dry mouth, also known as xerostomia.

Regeneration process

“In their process, they purified the silk fibers by removing a number of contaminants. We put stem cells from rat salivary glands on the silk framework with a media to nourish them. After several weeks in culture, the cells produced a 3-D matrix covering the silk scaffolds. The cells had many of the same characteristics as salivary gland cells that grow in the mouth,” he said.

“Until now, retention of salivary gland cell properties has not been possible using other tissue culture techniques. This unique culture system has great potential for future salivary gland research and for the development of new cell-based therapeutics.” Dr. Yeh explained.

Future research Because there are few salivary gland stem cells in the human mouth, the scientists plan to continue using rat salivary glands to refine the process, but eventually hope to use stem cells derived from human bone marrow or umbilical cord blood to regenerate salivary glands for humans.

Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


BETTER ORAL HYGIENE PROMOTES HEART HEALTH

14 July 2015

Do you know that poor health hygiene can result in loss of gum health and structural bone support. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “we make the effort to discuss the correlation between periodontal disease and heart disease with all our patients. There have been countless clinical studies to show a proportional relationship”.

The World Health Organization reports 10-20 percent of people worldwide have severe dental disease and nearly 40 percent has moderate disease. One study found that people who brushed their teeth less often had a 70 percent increased risk of heart disease compared to those with strict oral hygiene habits. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has specific recommendations for parents to develop healthy dental habits for their children. The American Dental Association has more age-specific recommendations for adults that include brushing twice daily along with regular flossing and regular dental visits.

For more information, visit the WHO website (http://www.who.int/topics/en/), the CDC website (http://www.cdc.gov) or www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com


DENTAL IMPLANTS FOR TOOTH REPLACEMENT

10 July 2015

Missing teeth don’t have to be a functional nightmare!

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners in Newton, Massachusetts, “patients have more options than ever when it comes to restoring their smiles. Bridges and dentures may have been your parents only option but today, dental implants are the treatment of choice. Dental implants can replace one or all missing teeth with a reconstruction that is both beautiful and comfortable.”

What are dental implants and how do they work?
As permanent replacement teeth, dental implants are rooted directly into the jawbone through a surgical procedure. Consisting of a titanium post with a ridged texture and a prosthetic crown, an implant replaces the roots of teeth and its biting surface. Since the titanium post is embedded into the jaw, it will serve as a pillar to a prosthetic tooth. The bone surrounding the implant will fuse to the post, securing it in place. This process allows a patient to enjoy a complete restoration of oral function since dental implants will not move or slide in the mouth, as dentures tend to do. Those receiving implants have many options for the appearance and construction of their dental crown. Very durable metals like gold can be used as well as materials like porcelain to provide a more natural, discreet look. Crowns are custom made by technicians so that they properly fit over the titanium post and in between existing natural teeth.

“Teeth in a day!”

With the synergistic combination of CAD/CAM and CT Scan data, treatment planning can be done on the computer with such precision that in many cases, implants can be placed and dentistry can be placed at the same visit. Called “immediate loading” a temporary crown or bridge is crafted ahead of time and can be positioned immediately after the implants are placed.

For additional information on dental implants or to schedule a consultation, visit: www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com


DENTAL MYTHS DEBUNKED

8 July 2015

Dental Myths Debunked by Dr. Ryne Johnson, Prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners:

Myth: Baby teeth all fall out eventually so there is no need for dental care for young children.

Fact: Baby, or primary teeth can decay, become infected and painful, if routine dental care isn’t sought early on. Baby teeth act as space maintainers allowing the permanent teeth to come into the mouth properly. Prematurely losing baby teeth (from decay) could cause teeth to drift and block out permanent teeth from growing in. A child’s first dental visit should take place by age one. Your child’s dentist should be monitoring and discussing with you, your youngster’s diet, hygiene, and oral habits.

Myth: Natural fruit juices won’t cause tooth decay like candy or soda will.

Fact: “Even 6-month-old infants can get decay, from going to sleep with a bottle or constant breast-feeding throughout the night,” says Dr. Ginsberg. “All juices contain sugar which can cause tooth decay. The only safe drink for children is water,”

Myth: It’s best to wait until my child loses all his baby teeth before seeing the orthodontist.

Fact: Waiting until all the permanent teeth arrive can result in two irreversible consequences: the need to extract permanent teeth due to the inability to correct crowding and missing a growth spurt without which extractions or jaw surgery is necessary. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that children see an orthodontist at age 7 for early detection of problems and to assure proper and timely planning for optimal care.

Myth: My child will grow out of it.

Fact: The majority of orthodontic problems do not-self correct.

Myth: The orthodontist will correct this problem with a retainer just worn at night.

Fact: Retainers are removable devices meant to retain, or hold teeth in place not designed to make active corrections. Tooth movement requires at least 20 hours of force applied daily over a period of time for teeth to safely reposition in a stable manner.

Myth: Wisdom teeth will cause other teeth to shift positions after orthodontics.

Fact: It’s a natural assumption to think that wisdom teeth (which commonly erupt in late adolescence) can cause post orthodontic changes, but the real cause of shifting or relapse is a late adolescent growth spurt of the lower jaw for a patient not wearing retainers.

Myth: Once teeth are straightened, no other follow-up is needed.

Fact: Teeth shift over varying degrees over a lifetime. Retainers mitigate these changes and are as important a part of orthodontic treatment as is wearing braces. Your child needs to be an active participant throughout treatment and retention in order to ensure a successful outcome.

Myth: My regular dentist says she is qualified to put braces on my child.

Fact: General dentists have a broad spectrum of knowledge but are experienced only in certain focused areas. Specialists are best qualified to provide services like orthodontics and pediatric dentistry for your children.

Lastly, don’t forget:
the check is in the mail; I gave at the office; and this won’t hurt a bit.

Bottom line: Don’t let myths guide your child’s dental care.

Original article in HuffPost


IT’S TIME TO CHANGE YOUR TOOTHBRUSH!

7 July 2015

You may be a creature of habit, but some seemingly innocuous everyday items of personal use may have outlived their time. Experts tell you when to discard them.

TOOTHBRUSH

Damaged bristles is a sign that you need to change your brush, and some toothbrushes even come with built-in indicators that change color when it is time to get a new replacement. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners says, “If you keep using a toothbrush beyond its life span, it won’t work as effectively, causing tartar and bacteria buildup. You think you’re brushing, but in effect it isn’t doing you any good.”

Dr Sitesh Roy, a US Board certified allergist, immunologist and asthma specialist, also advises you discard your toothbrush the moment you recover from a viral infection, regardless of how new it may be as “the viral antigens may make your toothbrush a home, and cause another infection.”


ONE-FOURTH OF AMERICANS LIE TO DENTISTS ABOUT FLOSSING

24 June 2015

One-fourth of Americans lie to dentists about flossing: survey

More than a quarter of Americans lie about it, and 36 percent say they would rather do an unpleasant activity like cleaning the toilet or working on their taxes. Flossing one’s teeth, according to a Harris Poll survey, is in some cases a less desirable activity than listening to the sound of nails on a chalkboard or to small children crying on a bus or plane. But according to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners who jokes, “Only floss the teeth you wish to keep”. The survey was conducted as part of the American Academy of Periodontology’s national campaign called “Love The Gums You’re With.” The industry group seeks to bring more awareness to gum disease. The survey found that the top three unpleasant activities that people would rather do than floss were washing a sink full of dirty dishes (18 percent preferred), cleaning the toilet (14 percent) and waiting in a long check-out line (14 percent). When analyzed by city, New Yorkers said they were more likely to floss daily, while people in Atlanta were more likely to be honest about flossing when asked by their dentists. Those in Chicago were more likely to prefer sitting in an hour of gridlock traffic than flossing. Overall, more than one-quarter of those surveyed said they lied to their dentists about flossing. The survey also showed that 88 percent of Americans would be somewhat or very likely to tell a friend if they had something stuck in their teeth, with those living in the Washington area the least likely to do so. The poll was conducted online March 20-30 on behalf of the American Academy of Periodontology. Harris Poll surveyed 2,021 American adults in the 10 largest U.S. cities.

(Reporting by Kylie Gumpert)


WHAT ARE YOU DRINKING AFTER YOUR WORKOUTS?

23 June 2015

Dr. Ryne Johnson asks “What are you drinking AFTER your workouts”?

According to recent research conducted by Texas A&M University Baylor College of Dentistry, you might want to think about what’s more important to you: healthy teeth or an energy boost?

While most athletes want their sports drinks to be delicious, researchers say the added acids used for taste can lead to greater risk of tooth demineralization. When frequently consumed, acids from sports drinks could have an erosive effect on the teeth.

Luckily, scientists say there are easy substitutes for those who depend on endurance drinks.

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners suggests, “Consuming ‘plain old water’ is always best.”

For both hydration and antioxidants, Johnson suggests consuming more fruits and vegetables with high H2O. Another all natural alternative is coconut water, which is low calories and sodium, but high in potassium.

“Natural, unflavored coconut water is best. Otherwise, it’s no better than soft drinks or juice because of the added sugars. A lot of people turn to sports drinks to replenish electrolytes lost while sweating through a workout but natural electrolytes can be found in fruits like berries, bananas, grapes, and cantaloupe.

Next time you hit the gym, you might want to grab some natural alternatives as opposed to the go-to sports drink. Who knows? You might even see a better result.

Original article found at CBS local media – DFW


HOW CALIFORNIA LAWMAKERS ARE PUSHING FOR DENTAL HEALTH

6 May 2015

A proposed bill in California is seeking to change baseball’s image for the better. Tony Thurmond, the author of the bill, proposes to ban all forms of tobacco from Major League Baseball games in California. The bill is part of a nationwide campaign planned by anti-tobacco groups seeking to publicly promote healthier habits.

A LONG-STANDING TRADITION

Tobacco has long been associated with baseball. And even though smoking has been banned for years, it’s commonplace to see players chewing and dipping tobacco during their games and practices. Smokeless tobacco has been linked to significant health problems and even deaths–most recently, the death of baseball icon Tony Gwynn. He died on June 16, 2014 from cancer of the salivary glands, which many dentists attribute to his habits of dipping tobacco.

WHAT CHANGES WILL BE MADE?

The proposed bill would ban all forms of tobacco from ballparks, including cigarettes and E-cigarettes. Stadiums would also be required to post signs to notify players and ballpark visitors of the ban. Dipping and chewing tobacco is already officially banned from Minor League games; however, the rules are not always enforced. If this law is passed, it should encourage officials to enforce the tobacco ban.

TOBACCO AND DENTAL HEALTH

Although Thurmond’s proposed bill would only affect California stadiums, he and other anti-tobacco activists hope that it will help bring greater awareness to their campaign and that the momentum will spread to other states as well. It’s no secret that tobacco use causes severe dental issues like gum disease, tooth decay, and bone loss; however, it continues to be popular despite the risks.

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, sees this sort of damage first hand as he works with patients with severe damage to their teeth and gums. As a dentist in Newton, MA, it’s his job to create dental prosthetics to replace teeth that have become too badly damaged to save. Unfortunately, this damage is all too common. However, Dr. Johnson and other dentists hope that with greater awareness about the negative effects of tobacco, young boys will follow in the footsteps of their role models on the baseball field and give up tobacco use for good.


WHO’S AT THE GREATEST RISK FOR PERIODONTAL DISEASE?

24 April 2015

Periodontal disease is extremely common in the United States, with nearly half of adults over age 30 affected by some degree of periodontitis. Periodontal disease begins as gum disease (also known as gingivitis), which is caused by a buildup of plaque and bacteria along your gumline. Over time, this develops into more serious inflammation that can cause permanent tissue damage and even tooth loss. Keep reading to find out who is at the greatest risk of developing this disease.

TOBACCO USERS

Smokers are much more likely to develop gum disease than nonsmokers. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, regularly treats patients who have suffered severe tissue damage from a lifetime of smoking. He recommends avoiding tobacco use altogether, including dipping and chewing, to improve your overall dental health and reduce your chances of developing periodontal disease.

PEOPLE WITH OTHER MEDICAL CONDITIONS

Medical conditions like diabetes and AIDS are often linked to periodontal disease. Anyone with a weakened immune system is at a higher risk of developing gum disease because the body has a hard time fighting off 2 diseases at once. Certain medications also increase your chance of developing periodontal disease. If you have a medical condition or are on any medications, contact our team of professionals to discuss steps you can take to reduce your risk of periodontal disease.

ETHNIC MINORITIES

A recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reveals that periodontal disease is more prevalent in ethnic minorities such as Hispanic-Americans, African-Americans, and Asian-Americans. As with other cases of periodontal disease, it is most common in those over 30 years old and can still be prevented with healthy dental practices. The study recommends that anyone with an elevated risk of developing periodontal disease should visit their dentist at least once a year for a thorough examination. Talk to your Newton dentist, Dr. Ryne Johnson and his team of professionals, if you have any concerns about your dental health or want to learn more about preventing periodontal disease.


WANT TO PERMANENTLY IMPROVE YOUR SMILE? SEE A COSMETIC DENTIST

15 April 2015

A cosmetic dentist in Newton, MA, like our very own Dr. Ryne Johnson can do many things for you if you want to improve your smile. Here are the top 4 treatments that cosmetic dentists perform that can help you land that job, meet your significant other, wow your date, and improve your overall quality of life.

TEETH WHITENING

This is perhaps the simplest cosmetic dentistry procedure, making it the least expensive and the quickest treatment as well. Teeth whitening involves a dentist using a whitening agent to whiten or bleach your teeth. Many offices will have systems available for you to whiten your teeth at home yourself. Teeth whitening is safe and a quick fix if you have yellowing or stained teeth.

TOOTH FILLINGS

If you have been putting off getting a tooth filled because you do not want the unsightly metal mouth look, you should know that advances in technology ensure fillings are not noticeable. Fillings can be done using porcelain or composite resin that mimics the look and function of your natural teeth, so even if you have to have a filling close to the front of your mouth, no one ever has to know.

DENTURES

Dentures have a reputation of being only for the very elderly, but an increasing number of both young and old people who are suffering from tooth decay and disease are choosing dentures. Denture technology has come a long way in the past few years. Especially when combined with other procedures such as dental implants, a treatment known as overdentures, dentures can help your smile look amazing and natural.

DENTAL IMPLANTS

Finally, dental implants are another common cosmetic dentistry procedure that replaces the roots of teeth that have been lost for any reason. Unlike dentures, dental implants are considered a permanent solution to tooth loss and have many health benefits, including the fact that they improve the health of the teeth that surround them.

For more information regarding these services, contact our prosthodontist, Dr. Ryne Johnson, and his team of professionals at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners today!


HOW MEASLES MAY BE DIAGNOSED BY YOUR DENTIST

3 April 2015

The MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine made measles a very uncommon disease in the United States. Until recently, the disease generally only occurred when brought in from outside the country. Recently, however, as more and more parents have selected not to vaccinate their children for various reasons, the disease has seen somewhat of a comeback. While most cases will be diagnosed by pediatricians or family physicians, a professional like our prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, Dr. Ryne Johnson, may even be able to spot them during a routine checkup. This is due to one of the earliest symptoms associated with the measles.

WHAT IS MEASLES?

Measles is caused by the Paramyxoviridae virus, and is spread airborne through coughing, sneezing, or even talking. It can also be picked up by touching an infected object and then touching your eyes, mouth, or nose. Symptoms may not appear until 14 days after exposure on average, and a person is generally contagious for three to five days before the characteristic rash appears, and about four days after the rash first appears. While usually recognized by the characteristic red, raised rash, the rash is generally the last of the symptoms to appear.

KOPLIK SPOTS

Instead, measles usually begins with a mild to moderate fever. There may also be a cough, malaise, red eyes, sore throat, runny nose, and lack of appetite. All of these symptoms, however, can easily be mistaken for other illnesses, such as the common cold. But one early symptom that is pathognomonic of measles, or that can distinguish measles from other illnesses, is Koplik spots.

Koplik spots occur inside of the mouth on the buccal and labial mucosa by the upper molars on the inside of the cheek. Koplik spots, named after the pediatrician who first described them, are small, white spots or papules that may have bluish-white centers. The spots are surrounded by a red ring. The red, raised rash typically associated with measles usually appears on the face and spreads to the neck, trunk, legs, and feet one to two days after Koplik spots appear.

MEASLES CARE

For most cases of measles, the virus will come and go without complications after about 10 to 17 days with plenty of rest and hydration. In some cases, complications such as pneumonia, ear infection, neurological problems, encephalitis, deafness, seizures, brain damage, and even death can occur. Some parents may mistake Koplik spots for sores in the mouth and take their child to the dentist for treatment. Recognizing Koplik spots as a measles symptom and waiting to take your child to the dentist until they have recovered can help prevent the spread of this highly contagious illness. The best treatment for the measles is prevention with vaccination.


7 REASONS WHY DENTAL IMPLANTS MAY BE RIGHT FOR YOU

25 March 2015

Are you struggling with your smile? A missing or crooked tooth shouldn’t be keeping your from meeting new people or speaking up in a group. Whether you are looking for a complete smile makeover or just to replace some missing or unhealthy teeth, here are a few of the reasons why dental implants could be right for you.

  1. It’s a more permanent tooth replacement option. Dental implants last longer than dentures or bridges. The implant is placed directly into your jaw, which means it’s there to stay.
  2. Dental implants preserve tooth tissue more than other types of tooth replacement. Because you have to pull teeth for dentures, your body begins to dissolve a lot of its gum tissue and jawbone.
  3. Because a dental implant is permanently secured into your mouth, there is no chance of it falling out. This means you will be able to eat, speak, and smile without worry.
  4. Requires less maintenance. A dental implant is permanent. You won’t have to remove it in order to clean it, as you would with dentures or bridges. You can brush and floss it as you would a normal tooth.
  5. Improves the appearance of your smile. Implants are designed to look as natural as possible. Whether you have 1 implant or 5, you can choose the shade, design, and shape to get the look you want.
  6. You don’t have to pull healthy teeth in order to get the mouth you want. When you opt for dentures, you compromise healthy teeth by pulling them to fit the bridge. However, with dental implants, you can replace 1 tooth or 12 without having to pull any healthy teeth.
  7. It will improve your self-confidence. Imagine kissing your sweetheart without having to worry about missing teeth or a bridge coming loose. With a dental implant, your mouth will look natural and sparkly without the worry of anything falling out.

Don’t let your smile hold you back anymore. If you are looking for dental implants in Newton, schedule an appointment with Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners today!


TIPS ON TELLING A GOOD DENTIST FROM A BAD ONE

14 March 2015

Dental care is an important part of staying healthy, yet many people neglect to take care of their oral health due to a simple fear of dentists. While it would be easy for us to say that the fear is irrational, the truth is, there are too many horror stories out there to ignore. Just as there are good teachers and bad and good doctors and bad, there are good dentists and bad dentists. The trick to having a positive experience at the dentist’s office is finding a good one. Here are a few tips and tricks on finding a dentist in Newton, MA, which will take good care of the patient’s teeth and reduce their anxiety.

READ ONLINE REVIEWS

The first step in looking for a great dentist is reading reviews. A few places to find reviews on dentists include Yahoo!, Google, and Healthgrades.com. All of these websites offer a glimpse into what kind of office the dentist runs and whether it is compatible with a potential client’s lifestyle. One important thing to remember when looking at online reviews is to pay attention to the number of reviewers. All too often, a business can have a five star review but only one or two reviewers. Just because one or two people had a good experience at that particular dentist’s office doesn’t necessarily mean the dentist is a good one. It is much better to look at a three or four star review created by the opinions of at least 10 people.

CONDUCT A JOB INTERVIEW

After finding a dentist with a good review, set an interview appointment. If the dentist says he or she doesn’t do interview appointments, find another dentist. If they value patients, they value potential patients. Preparing for the interview is important. Think very carefully about the needs the dentist will have to fulfill. Are there children who will need dental care? Does the dentist need to be comfortable with working with cosmetic dentistry? Are there special conditions with which the dentist will need to be comfortable? Does the dentist need to have business hours outside the usual nine to five? Have these questions in hand during the interview and don’t be shy.

MAKE A PERSONAL VISIT

Finally, make sure the office is clean and make sure to talk to the other patients waiting there. If they have been waiting for more than 15 minutes and that is the usual wait time, the dentist is too busy and will probably not be able to give patients the time and care they need.


WHY WE’RE YOUR BEST OPTION FOR COSMETIC DENTISTRY IN NEWTON

4 March 2015

To get the most out of your smile, select a dentist that can help you achieve a healthy smile from the inside out. Selecting the right dentist can make all the difference, and we want you to know why Dr. Ryne Johnson and the professionals at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners are the best option for cosmetic dentistry in Newton, MA. We’ll help you turn your dull or yellowing smile into a set of pearly whites you can’t help but show off.

If your smile is healthy on the inside but yellowing or appears dull on the outside, you may be missing out on opportunities to share it with the world. You can feel confident that we are the best choice for your cosmetic dentistry needs because we offer the following procedures that will help you attain the smile you’ve always imagined.

WHITENING

Over time, the foods you consume and beverages you drink will begin to alter the natural color of your teeth. If you are not taking a proactive approach with whitening toothpastes and avoiding dark or staining liquids, your teeth will begin to darken or yellow in color, leaving you with a dull or aged appearance.

Luckily, you do not have to live with discolored teeth. With our expert teeth whitening services which can be administered in office or with a take-home treatment, you can reach a shade that is both healthy and youthful looking.

VENEERS

If you have a chipped or misshapen tooth, it will alter the overall appearance of your smile. What once was a problem you were required to become accustomed to is no more. With veneers that are retrofitted in-office, we can help to build upon a healthy tooth to give you a more cohesive and natural-looking smile.

IMPLANTS

A missing tooth can create an eyesore in your mouth that you may be embarrassed of. With the assistance a dental implant provides, empty spaces can be filled with a permanent tooth replacement that looks and acts like a natural tooth. We can complete an implant and place it in just a couple of visits, assuring you a final product that you will be proud to show off.

If you are looking for assistance with rejuvenating your smile, consider our long list of services to meet your needs for cosmetic dentistry needs in Newton, MA, and the surrounding area to help you gain a smile that you’ve always dreamed of having.


NERVOUS ABOUT THE DENTIST? TIPS FOR A MORE COMFORTABLE VISIT

25 February 2015

It is not uncommon for people to feel a little anxious before heading to the dentist. If scheduling an appointment makes you nervous, you may feel compelled to avoid going to the dentist for as long as possible. We recommend that you see your regular dentist every six months, and you may also be interested in improving your smile and self-esteem by taking advantage of cosmetic dentistry.

Do not let your fear of the dentist impact your health or self-confidence. Follow these tips to make your visit a little easier.

TIPS FOR A BETTER VISIT

Here are some easy ways to help you enjoy your trip to the dentist a little bit more:

  • Find a way to distract yourself while you are in the chair. We understand if you prefer to listen to calming music or watch television while we provide your dental services. Finding a way to keep your mind busy will help the time pass and make you more comfortable.
  • Bring someone with you who you trust and who will be able to make you feel comfortable. Having a loved one nearby can make even the most difficult situation much easier. If you let us know, we can even bring your loved one into the examination room and they can stay with you through the entire visit.
  • Take a light sedative before heading to our Newton, MA, dentist office. There are medications out there that are made to help you relax before you go into a situation that stresses you out. Speak to your doctor about which medication would be best for you based on your unique needs.
  • Let us know that being in the office makes you uncomfortable. We can take care to explain things to you and be extra gentle throughout your visit.

Schedule an appointment with Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, today!


KEY DIFFERENCES BETWEEN GENERAL AND COSMETIC DENTISTRY

23 February 2015

When you’re looking for a dentist, it’s hard to know if you should search for a dentist who advertises abilities in cosmetic dentistry or if you should just stick to a dentist with a lot of general dentistry experience. The answer to this conundrum is both. A good dentist can provide necessary general dentistry procedures but should also be able to recommend and perform procedures that can improve your smile and your confidence. Here are the key differences between the two types of dentistry.

HYGIENE VS. APPEARANCE

General dentistry focuses on the health and hygiene of the mouth. Everyone should have an examination every six months to receive preventive care and to make sure the teeth and gums are healthy. Cosmetic dentistry in Newton, MA, however, focuses more on the appearance of your teeth. This may necessitate changes that enhance both the function and aesthetic appeal of your teeth.

COMMON GENERAL DENTISTRY PROCEDURES

In addition to regular cleanings and exams, general dentistry includes procedures to treat damaged teeth. Some of the most common procedures performed are

  • Standard fillings used to treat cavities.
  • Frequent cleanings to monitor and prevent gum disease.
  • Root canals to remedy a severely infected tooth.

COMMON COSMETIC DENTISTRY PROCEDURES

Newton cosmetic dentistry provides care for the health of teeth and gums as well, but also aims to enhance the teeth’s appearance. These procedures can range from elective teeth whitening to restorative implants. Here are a few examples:

  • Inlays or onlays are a more aesthetically pleasing way to fill a tooth.
  • Bonding to fixes discolored or chipped teeth.
  • Chips and cracks may also be repaired using veneers, which are porcelain laminates that cover the surface of the teeth.
  • Dental implants are a popular choice for tooth replacement because the replacement teeth are bonded to a post that is fused to the jawbone.

Schedule an appointment with Dr. Ryne Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners today to learn how we can help with your general and cosmetic dentistry needs.


IMPROVING YOUR SMILE WITH COSMETIC DENTISTRY

9 February 2015

The majority of people agree that a great smile can create a great first impression and boost your confidence in your personal and professional life. When you’re looking to improve your smile, you should speak with your cosmetic dentist. He or she can offer you the following procedures to help you get the smile you want:

TEETH WHITENING

As people get older, teeth begin to yellow. They can also get stained through cigarette smoke, wine, soda, and other things. Whitening your teeth will remove the stains and brighten your smile. It can be a great way to make your smile stand out. Teeth whitening is the most common cosmetic procedures. Not only does it give you great results, but it’s also a quick process with either an in-office laser treatment or gel trays that you can take home.

CROWNS

Crowns are fitted to go over teeth that may have imperfections, such as chips or signs of decay. You may have been injured or have problems grinding your teeth, so crowns can be a great way to cover these problems and strengthen your teeth.

VENEERS

Similar to crowns, veneers help cover imperfections in your smile. Your dentist will create one out of plastic or porcelain that can be attached to your teeth with dental glue and a special beam of light. Whether your teeth are too small, too large, crooked, or have an unusual shape or appearance, veneers can be a great way to hide the imperfections and improve your smile.

INVISALIGN

If you have space between your teeth or other alignment problems, you used to have to get braces attached to your teeth to fix the problem. Although braces are still available to people who choose to take that route, you can also use Invisalign to improve your smile without anyone noticing the clear tray that goes over your teeth to straighten your teeth.

Smile improvement isn’t out of your reach with the right cosmetic dentist helping you achieve it. Schedule a consultation with Newton Wellesley Dental Partners to examine your teeth and discuss the right procedures that you can use to get the perfect smile that you want to have.


CAD/CAM DENTISTRY, NEWTON, MA

8 February 2015

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners uses spectacular technology in our practice, which sets us far above other traditional dentists. CAD/CAM technology is an acronym that stands for computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing. This technology is used in dentistry to help create precise shapes and sizes for dental restoration. This includes bridges and caps as well as inlays and onlays. Dr. Johnson uses this technology to design the anatomical features, size, and shape of the tooth.

A 3D image of your mouth and gums is displayed on a computer screen, which allows the doctors to draw the precise design of the tooth restoration and this gives you a perfect fit! This first step creates the “thimble”, which sits over the tooth against the gum. Then an artisan layers the ceramic over the thimble in order to create the natural look. Dr. Johnson’s philosophy is that “dentistry should be imperceptible”. Visit us in Newton or Wellesley for precise dental services.


3 WAYS A DENTIST CAN IMPROVE YOUR SMILE

7 February 2015

Today we are lucky to have dentists that benefit from years of development of cosmetic dental procedures. This century, medicine has made immense strides. Dentistry is no different, going from a field wracked with superstition, where you were most likely going to be advised to have your teeth pulled out whenever any problems cropped up, to a field full of technologically advanced procedures. Now dentists utilize advanced technologies like x-rays and CT scans to find out what’s going on with infected teeth, as well as treatments that enhance the aesthetics of people’s smiles. Here we share 3 ways that you can get a better smile.

GETTING CROWDED TEETH FIXED

If you have crowded teeth but have already gone through the orthodontics procedures, there are ways that a cosmetic dentist can relieve pressure on your teeth and make your teeth look better. Dentists can use a procedure called reshaping to shave off excess enamel. If your teeth are overly large, drilling off some extra enamel won’t make much of a difference. This can be used to make teeth less crowded because there will be less tooth material to create tension between teeth.

You can also get discreet aligners, plastic retainers, to gradually shift teeth. This method isn’t quick or drastic enough for severely crowded teeth, but can also be used to keep teeth in the correct position if they are finally in the ideal position.

FIXING IRREGULARLY-SHAPED TEETH

You can improve your smile drastically by getting them shaped. If you were born with teeth that were not shaped rectangular, dentists can remove some enamel to make them into ideal shapes. Removing enamel is done with a drill and doesn’t require more than a local anesthetic. If you need material added to your teeth to make them more visually appealing, you will have to have ceramic material bonded to the surface of your molars or incisors. The process for this involves roughing the teeth with a drill and bonding the ceramic, which is matched to the tooth’s color.

For any additional questions or to schedule an appointment, reach out to Newton Wellesley Dental Partners to schedule an appointment with Dr. Ryne Johnsons and his team of professionals today!


A FEW INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT DENTAL IMPLANTS

6 February 2015

If you’ve had teeth removed, your options are threefold: You can get a tooth bridge, which is a line of false teeth that are placed along your jawline and added to the teeth already in place. The other two options are dentures or dental implants. Dentures are a full set of false teeth that are typically adhered in place with a polymer-based, sticky substance. Each night, dentures are left to soak in an anti-bacterial solution and cleaned of any food residue. Bridges typically call for teeth still intact to be modified. Your teeth may need to be drilled down to make the bridge fit. Our dental implants in Newton have several benefits over other options, which we will outline in this quick guide.

PERMANENT ADDITIONS TO YOUR MOUTH

Dental implants are advantages over dentures because they become permanent parts of your mouth. This increases the ease with which you can do numerous vital functions, like speaking and eating. When eating, you will become used to using your new dental implants as if they were your own teeth, which will be designed in a computer program to mimic your natural teeth and will fit in the space available in your mouth. This perfect fit and long-term ability to get used to the new addition to your mouth will allow you to also speak without slurring or having irregular patterns in your voice. With dentures, it can be difficult to both eat and speak.

DURABILITY AND CONVENIENCE

Dental implants will last for years and won’t need to be soaked or specially cleaned each day. They can be cleaned just like the rest of your teeth, with twice-daily brushing and flossing. This will increase the convenience to the point where you will forget that your implants are even synthetic pieces of your actual jaw and tooth line. It will also do away with the discomfort of having a large piece of fake, removable material, like dentures, in your mouth all day.

Set up an appointment with Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners today!


WHY SHOULD YOU SEE A COSMETIC DENTIST?

6 February 2015

Over the years, our bodies begin to heal and otherwise regenerate less quickly. Beginning to look like you’re aging is a combination of many factors, but whenever you begin to attend to them, you can start to slow the process or even reverse some of the negative effects that the years can have on your looks. One thing that makes people look aged is their teeth. Stained and chipped teeth can be a sign that the years have finally caught up to you. We find that when people get the stains on their teeth removed and irregularities of shape corrected, achieved with our cosmetic dentistry in Newton, MA, their smiles look better and more youthful.

WHITENING AND BLEACHING TEETH

Stains on teeth come from the accumulation of tannins. Tannins are pigments found in tea, coffee, and wine. Teeth can also be stained by tobacco and even regular ingesting of dark chocolate! All of these can make teeth look off-white, yellow, or even brown. Removing the stains is accomplished by placing UV-sensitive gel on them. A laser activates the gel and it brings teeth back to a lighter shade. Bleaching, in contrast, will actually make teeth whiter than they were originally. If you were born with discolored teeth, bleaching can even the underlying color.

CORRECTING SHAPE IRREGULARITIES

Over time, the enamel of teeth can chip or break. This can be caused by impacts, which are especially common if people are involved in sports or other high-contact activities. Cosmetic dentistry can correct these flaws with ceramic material that is placed on teeth with delicate tools. For small chips, the tooth is roughed with a drill and then the ceramic is applied and dried with air and laser light. For larger problems, you can get the whole front of your tooth covered with a ceramic veneer, which will be fully attached to the tooth and will make it very regular in terms of color, shape, and texture.

Call Newton Wellesley Dental Partners today to learn more about what Dr. Ryne Johnson and our cosmetic team have offer!


WHERE DID COSMETIC DENTISTRY COME FROM? A BRIEF HISTORY

4 February 2015

Did you know that people have tried to whiten and straighten their teeth for thousands of years? There’s textual evidence from the Roman poet Catullus that people were willing to go to extreme lengths to whiten their teeth. Many people would swish with sour goats’ milk or even with substances that contained urea, which might be as unsavory as animal urine! We are lucky that today we don’t need to resort to ancient wire contraptions to close gaps in teeth or any mysterious potions that probably won’t work to correct teeth coloration issues. We can tell you about the numerous advancements that have happened in cosmetic dentistry in Newton, MA, and around the world!

EVIDENCE OF THE FIRST FILLINGS AND TOOTH IMPLANTS

Tooth fillings and implants were both intended to be aesthetic and functional improvements. Archaeologists discovered a beeswax filling in what is now Turkey, which has been dated to over 5000 years in the past. Fillings would over unsightly holes caused by plaque and would keep them from getting infected again. Dental implants have been created using teeth bought from people who have lost them throughout history. Early dentists would collect teeth, screw them into posts made from wood or metal, and then give them to patients to put in place of their missing molars or incisors. In Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables, one of the main characters sells her teeth in 18th century France. The demand for her teeth can be explained by the demand for real-tooth implants.

DENTISTRY IMPROVES IN THE MODERN AGE

After bacteria was discovered in the 20th century, medicine of all kinds became much more advanced. People began to insist on brushing and flossing to prevent tooth decay, as well as using sterile methods for cosmetic dentistry. Dental implants and dentures began to be made from polymer and stainless steel, which wouldn’t put harmful metals or other substances into the body. The newest technology our Newton cosmetic dentistry practice utilizes includes digital scanning and imaging to make smiles better. Schedule an appointment with Dr. Ryne Johnson and his team of dental experts at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners today!


DENTAL VENEERS FOR FULLER LIPS AND REDUCE WRINKLES – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, WESTON

12 September 2014

Porcelain dental veneers have grown significantly in popularity over the past few years as more and more patients begin to see the benefits that an improved smile can offer to both confidence and appearance.

While the American Association of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD) reports that porcelain veneers procedures have increased by 250% in the past five years, patients have only recently begun to seek the procedure as a way to enhance lip fullness and plumpness. Dental veneers can help increase confidence and improve one’s smile by augmenting natural lip shape. In fact, Dr. Johnson says that dental veneers are a very common cosmetic dentistry procedure, but now patients are choosing veneers in order to produce fuller lips, reduce wrinkles, and improve the appearance of the entire face.

By adhering a thin, wafer-like strip of porcelain to the surface of teeth, veneers create an added thickness to the teeth that pushes out one’s natural lip curves to create a more rounded, ample shape. With a dental procedure like porcelain veneers in Newton and Wellesley, patients can experience plump, luscious lips without having to undergo plastic surgical procedures or dermal fillers.

Dental veneers can improve the look of the smile and the entire face, and are permanent unlike dermal fillers. With veneers, patients can permanently enhance their lips and remove or reduce wrinkles in the corner of their mouth without having to endure frequent injections.

As with any procedure, consult with an experienced and dedicated prosthodontist before proceeding with any cosmetic enhancement. Through the skilled hands of a qualified dentist, patients can achieve full, natural lips to complement their overall appearance.

For more information, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. And remember, “See a Specialist, the Difference will Make You Smile.”

Cosmetic Dentists News


STRAIGHT TEETH HAVE MORE THAN JUST COSMETIC BENEFITS – WELLESLEY, WESTON, NEWTON

4 September 2014

Perfectly formed, gleaming teeth in neat and even rows: On television, everyone has them, and in real life, everyone admires them. Cosmetic reasons for getting teeth aligned are pretty self-evident, but did you know that having straight teeth comes with additional health benefits?

Since oral hygiene is an important part of overall health, this is just one way having straight teeth can improve one’s well-being.

1. Easier to Keep Clean

Straight teeth are easier to brush and floss than crooked and overlapping teeth, which are more likely to trap food particles.

If teeth are crooked, there are places the bristles of the toothbrush cannot reach, and plaque and tartar accumulates. People with straight teeth are able to keep them clean without extra effort.

2. Lower Disease Risk

Having easy-to-clean teeth will then lower your risk for gum disease, which can lead to heart disease and may contribute to diabetes.

Oral bacteria can enter your bloodstream and affect the inner lining of blood vessels and brain.

While the plaque on your teeth is not the same stuff in arteries that cause heart attacks, the same species of bacteria that cause periodontitis is also found in artery-clogging plaque.

3. Avoiding Tooth Loss

Ten percent of 50- to 64-year-olds have lost all teeth, and most adults lose at least one tooth over their lifetime.

Since the most common reasons for tooth loss are periodontal disease and tooth decay, it pays to make sure that your teeth are as easy to take care of as possible.

4. Keeping Your Jawbone Healthy

Some people are born with gaps in their teeth or have adult teeth that never came in. Others lose an adult tooth. A missing tooth leaves that area of the jawbone with little to do, so the bone in that area grows weak, leading to possible tooth loss.

Braces might not be the best option to close a gap where an entire tooth is missing. In that case, the most popular restorative option is to get a dental implant.

5. Fewer Headaches

Teeth alignment issues contribute to bad bites and teeth grinding, both of which can lead to headaches. Correcting alignment will help alleviate these issues.

6. Less Chipping

The more your teeth jut, the more likely they could get cracked or chipped in an injury. This is a particularly important consideration for players of high-impact or contact sports.

In aligned teeth, the pressure from the bite will go along the long axis of the teeth versus hitting from the side. This makes it less likely for the teeth to be chipped or abraded, and the long-term prognosis for the teeth is much more favorable.

7. Lower Risk of Lip and Gum Injury

Crooked teeth can push against soft tissues in the mouth. If you routinely bite your cheek or lips due to a misaligned bite, it can result in cuts, sores, and infections—not to mention the annoyance.

8. Better Digestion

Poorly aligned teeth can compromise chewing, and chewing is the first step of proper digestion. When you chew, saliva carries enzymes that help break down the food, making it easier for the stomach and intestines to do their jobs and reducing the number of bacteria needed to help break down nutrients in the gut.

So when chewing is a chore, people are often tempted to gloss over this important—and pleasurable—part of their meals. A lot of patients report they can enjoy food better after getting their teeth aligned.

9. Clearer Speech

Try pronouncing “van” or “fan” if you have a gap in your front teeth, and you may find that you’ll whistle a little.

A lot of times when people have diastema, during speech, they have trouble [pronouncing clearly. Patients who straightened their teeth have experienced improved speech. Diastema” is the term for a gap between teeth.

Clearer speech is naturally a confidence booster and may help correct psychological causes for speech impediments like stuttering.

10. Smiling More, Feeling Happier

Research shows that smiling—even if it’s forced—actually makes you happier. If you are self-conscious about crooked teeth, you might not be smiling as much as you would otherwise.

Straight teeth give a confidence boost, you can’t imagine. A lot of people suffer loss of self- esteem due to crooked or otherwise misaligned teeth and then get a confidence boost when their teeth are aligned.

For more information on cosmetic treatments for misaligned teeth, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. And remember, “See a Specialist, the Difference will Make You Smile.”

Epoch Times


COSMETIC DENTISTRY FOR HEALTH REASONS TOO – WESTON, WELLESLEY, NEWTON

21 August 2014

More than 9 in 10 Americans say a smile is the most important social asset, and three quarters of them say an unattractive smile would hurt a person’s career chances.

But only half of adults polled by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry say they are happy with their own smiles. As a society, we are very smile conscious.

While some may turn to cosmetic dentistry solely for aesthetic purposes, it also can improve dental health.

A person with malocclusion, or misalignment of teeth, who opts for cosmetic dentistry will likely end up with a prettier smile. But straighter teeth also will be easier to clean, potentially leading to better oral health.

There also can be a self-esteem boost that comes with having an improved smile.

There are instances when cosmetic dentistry is not strictly cosmetic. There’s a place for it.

A dentist should ask patients why they want cosmetic dentistry and what they want to achieve with improvements to their smile, then proceeds from there to decide what procedure might be best for that patient.

There are different reasons to choose it. If it’s just the shade of their teeth that patients are concerned about, then maybe bleaching is enough. If the patient has very good teeth intact and wants to even them out, maybe dental veneers are the way to go.

If the dentist suggests cosmetic dentistry, patients can ask several questions to help them decide what is best for them:

  • What is your reasoning for it?
  • Why do you believe I need it?
  • Is it strictly cosmetic or are there health benefits for me?
  • What are risks and benefits of it?

If patients are not satisfied with the answers, they should seek second opinions. For more information, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. And remember "See a Specialist, the Difference will Make You Smile.">


COSMETIC DENTISTRY IMPROVES SELF-CONFIDENCE IN WOMEN AND MEN – NEWTON, WELLESLEY

8 August 2014

The results of a survey conducted by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry showed that virtually all Americans — 99.7% to be exact — believe that a nice looking smile is an important physical asset. Countless patients are seen who don’t like the way their teeth look and are eager to improve their smiles through cosmetic dentistry. There is an extensive selection of cosmetic solutions for patients who choose Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist & director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, who has been regarded as a pioneer in computer assisted dentistry.

Self-confidence is serious business. Only 4% of all women worldwide think that they are beautiful and six out of 10 girls stop doing the things they love when they aren’t happy about their looks. It’s not surprising that the majority of patients seeking cosmetic dental treatments sare women. But it’s not just women — a research study found that more than four in five men use language that shows they have anxiety about their appearance.

The modern treatments that Newton Wellesley Dental Partners offers often help improve self-confidence in patients when it comes to their smiles. Some of his procedures include teeth whitening, porcelain veneers, dental implants, and fixed or removable bridges and crowns that can last for many years with good care.

In-office teeth whitening is a popular cosmetic service that patients often request. A high grade whitening gel is applied on the teeth with custom trays. The entire process takes about an hour and leaves patients with very desirable results that can last for two years or more. The length of time that the teeth stay white depends on each patient’s commitment to regular care and maintenance.

You can often achieve fast and efficient solutions to aesthetic issues with cosmetic dentistry. Cosmetic options have improved significantly over the past couple of decades. Patients can now have straight, nicely aligned white teeth faster than ever before. For the first time in a long time, you can feel confident about smiling.

For more information, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com and remember to “See a specialist, the difference will make you smile“.

News Medical


COSMETIC DENTISTRY OPTIONS FOR A CONFIDENT SMILE – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, WESTON

4 August 2014

Today, Americans are fascinated with a bright, white smile. But this fascination does not stem from vanity alone. Most people understand the relationship between a confident smile and the ability to project that confidence. If you are entering the singles scene, looking for a new job, or would like a younger appearance, cosmetic dentistry has simple procedures to dramatically change your appearance which can dramatically change your life.

Some of the most common cosmetic dental procedures are below:

Teeth Whitening

Most teeth can be whitened. This is also called bleaching. There are a number of ways to whiten teeth. External tooth whitening happens when vital teeth are bleached by direct contact with a safe and commonly used whitening agent. The most successful teeth whitening is accomplished with in-office teeth whitening, where the dentist can create custom designed whitening trays that will ensure your whole tooth is lightened safely and completely.

Fillings

If you have a cavity, you no longer need to rely on unattractive metals fillings. High density, state-of-the-art plastic (composite resins) and porcelain materials can be used instead. These invisible fillings more naturally mimic the look, feel, and function of your natural teeth. Another advantage of composite fillings is that they preserve more of the natural tooth so less repair work is necessary immediately and in the future. Plastic and porcelain filling materials are also more natural in appearance; making it almost impossible to tell that you have a filling.

Dentures

Dentures are commonly used for tooth replacement. However, they do have their issues. Mainly, dentures rest on teeth and gums for stability, which can encourage bone loss, tooth decay, and periodontal disease. However, dentures can be relined every few years to compensate for bone loss and any compromised facial integrity.

However, there have been modern advances in dentures. Dentures held by dental implants may be an option. This is a combination of traditional dentures and dental implants to prevent bone loss that could result from dentures alone.

Dental Implants

They are the optimum choice for replacing missing teeth. They replace the roots of lost teeth. A dental implant and crown replaces a one or more missing teeth and helps to maintain the support of the adjacent teeth. This extends the life span of the surrounding teeth by preserving the bone. Dental implants are considered a permanent and can be expected to last for many years with the proper care. A tooth replaced with a dental implant looks just like a natural tooth.

For more cosmetic dentistry options, or to discuss the right option for you, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

AACD


TEETH WHITENING MYTHS BUSTED – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, WESTON

24 July 2014

We are surrounded by Hollywood looking teeth. In fact, teeth whitening is one of the most popular cosmetic procedures. But, there are some who are worried about the effects of whitening? Below are some of the most common myths and beliefs about teeth whitening –busted! In-office teeth whitening will give you that red carpet smile you have been looking for.

Is it true you shouldn’t get your teeth whitened before you’re thirty?

Patients in their 20s are suitable candidates for whitening. Teens are far more likely to have teeth that aren’t fully emerged yet, and in a few cases may still have some of their first teeth remaining. Whitening before a full set of adult teeth have emerged can lead to white tips and darkening towards the gum line, or teeth being different colors to those around them, both of which can be difficult to rectify.

How often will you need to get the whitening repeated?

It all depends on what type of whitening you choose and your lifestyle choices. Factors such as smoking and drinking wine, tea and coffee can increase how often treatment needs to be repeated. It’s a good idea to think about maintaining white teeth with products available to buy over the counter, such as specialist whitening toothpaste or mouthwash. It’s also well worth booking in for a hygienist appointment every 3-6 months for a thorough clean and check-up as that’s the best way to maintain a long-lasting, healthy, clean smile.

Is this a similar whitening process that celebrities go for?

Yes, celebrities are most likely to have their teeth professionally whitened, as opposed to an at-home option.

In-office teeth whitening treatments are more effective than at-home ones; true or false?

At home treatments can work, however they need to be repeated more often and will most likely not give you the results you are looking for. Targeted whitening cannot be achieved at home, and the level of whitening agents is greatly reduced in these kits. In office teeth whitening can be tailored to your needs; if one tooth is significantly darker than others this can be targeted and brought up to a same color as the others. Also at home kits contain generic sized mouth guards whereas in the clinic we can create guards from impressions which fit teeth perfectly. This greatly reduces the risk of gum damage and burn blisters which can occur from bleach leaking from ill-fitting guards. So overall, yes it is true; in clinic treatments are more effective.

Does teeth whitening ruin the enamel on your teeth?

Long exposure to bleaching agents can cause the enamel on teeth to be damaged, which is why it’s important to whiten teeth professionally. Many people think whitening teeth is not safe, which actually isn’t true.

Does teeth whitening cause sensitivity?

The most common side effect of teeth whitening is sensitivity afterwards, however this is usually mild and the professional treatment isn’t painful at all. With the correct after-care this sensitivity can be minimized and controlled.

Can the nerves be damaged?

The enamel of the tooth is made more permeable after whitening, which can irritate the nerve. By following the instructions of your dentist the likelihood of nerve damage is reduced to almost nothing.

You shouldn’t drink coffee or red wine after a whitening treatment; true or false?

Consumption of heavily staining products such as red wine and coffee can discolor the tooth surface. It is best to avoid these to ensure that your smile retains its brightness for as long as possible. By sipping fizzy drinks and fruit juices through a straw, you may reduce your teeth’s exposure to these staining beverages.

For more information on in-office teeth whitening, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

Glamor Magazine


TIPS ON COSMETIC DENTISTRY – NEWTON, WELLESLEY

8 July 2014

Do you know how important an attractive smile can be to someone’s self-esteem? If you suffer with a ‘less-than-perfect-smile” then you know that a great smile is directly related to self-confidence, self-esteem and other’s perception of you.

While there are several cosmetic dentistry treatments available today that are more available to the general population, it is important to make an educated decision about the procedure and the dentist you choose.

For those who have unattractive teeth, or who have teeth they are unhappy with, here are six tips about cosmetic dentistry:

Tip 1:
Teeth whitening is the most popular cosmetic dentistry procedure. Patients with moderate to severe discoloration should use professional teeth whitening to assure an even white tone without over-bleaching. This typically takes no more than an hour per visit.

Tip 2:
The second-most popular cosmetic dentistry procedure is dental veneers. These thin layers, frequently made of porcelain, are placed over teeth to correct problems such as discoloration and gaps all at one time. Veneers can last seven to 20 years with proper care.

Tip 3:
Dental implants are not only cosmetic, but functional. To replace missing or badly damaged teeth, a titanium screw (implant) is inserted into the jawbone, and a false tooth (crown) is put on top. This false tooth looks and feels just like a real tooth.

Tip 4:
Teeth make a difference in first impressions. A USA Today study showed that the more than 5,000 single men and women surveyed said they judge a potential partner on their teeth most upon first meeting them. Teeth were higher than clothing and hair and all other factors.

Tip 5:
Most cosmetic dentistry patients (5%) are 40-60 years old.

Tip 6:
Cosmetic dentistry patients will spend between $5,000 and $6,000 on average on cosmetic dental work to improve their smile.

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners offers cosmetic dentistry services and general dentistry such as teeth cleanings, X-rays, fillings, extractions, root canals, crowns, teeth whitening and veneers. However, as a prosthodontist, Dr. Johnson is also is an expert in more advanced implant dentistry, facelift dentures, and bone grafting sinus lifts.

Those looking for cosmetic dental surgery or reconstructive dentistry should contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners for more information.

digitaljournal.com


COSMETIC DENTISTRY OPTIONS – NEWTON, WELLESLEY

19 June 2014

Today there are several different types of cosmetic dental treatments that everyday people can choose from. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “patients can rejuvenate smiles that have been affected by accidents, oral health problems and other issues. Treatment possibilities are dependent on a variety of factors, including health status, age, and severity and type of cosmetic issues”. The cosmetic procedures offered can often be combined with more extensive needs for aesthetic improvement, which allows patients the option of achieving a smile and appearance that suite and pleases them.

Dr. Johnson offers a personal approach to cosmetic dentistry, giving all patients individualized treatment and discussing options that will suit their lifestyle and their budget. If you have aesthetic issues that concern you, there is now a cosmetic dentistry procedure that can meet your needs.

Many complete cosmetic enhancement can be performed in one visit, increasing the convenience for busy people who are trying to achieve that beautiful smile. Cutting-edge equipment and the latest techniques combine to enhance the value of the cosmetic dentistry choices.

Patients may receive recommendations a number of different treatments depending on their cosmetic needs. For example, tooth discoloration can be addressed with in-office teeth whitening treatments or porcelain veneers depending on the severity and origin of the problem. With veneers, structural issues, such as cracks, chips and gaps can also be permanently concealed while strengthening teeth.

When patients consider cosmetic treatment you need to weigh your needs against your budget and time constraints by considering both noninvasive and invasive options. For more information, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

prnewswire.com


HALL OF FAMER TONY GWYNN DIES OF SALIVARY GLAND CANCER

17 June 2014

Baseball Hall of Famer Tony Gwynn died at the age of 54 on Monday, following a long battle with salivary gland cancer.

Prior to being diagnosed, Gwynn had undergone three procedures to remove noncancerous lesions from his parotid gland, one of the major salivary glands located in front of and just below each ear. On numerous occasions, Gwynn had attributed his cancer to having dipped tobacco throughout most of his career.

But does the science back up that claim?

When it comes to the origins of most cancers, many experts are hesitant to attribute the development of tumors to one cause in particular. However, numerous studies and anecdotal evidence have exhibited a strong association between chewing tobacco and an increased risk of cancers in the oral cavity.

For one thing, the tobacco itself contains various chemicals and carcinogens that can damage tissue it comes in contact with.

“Chewing tobacco, specifically snuff, actually has things like fiber glass that roughs up the mucous [membrane]; this is meant to aid the absorption of nicotine, but it also creates a more permeable place for carcinogens to enter the tissue,” Dr. Chad Zender, in the otolaryngology department at UH Case Medical Center, told FoxNews.com. “And just like tobacco smoke, tobacco itself has cancer-causing compounds in it. If you add it to things like alcohol, it works together synergistically.”

“For several of my patients, if they chew tobacco on one point of the mouth, that is the part of the mouth that develops cancer,” Dr. Krzysztof Misiukiewicz, assistant professor of medical oncology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, told FoxNews.com. “It’s proof that direct contact matters.”

The use of smokeless tobacco is also associated with the development of a variety of precancerous lesions in the oral cavity – including oral leukoplakia, erythroplasia, tobacco-associated keratosis and more. According to the American Cancer Society, three out of four people who use chewing tobacco have non-cancerous or pre-cancerous lesions (sores) in their mouths.

These sores can present as firm, discolored bumps, and many have the ability to become malignant if left untreated.

“When you touch your tongue, if you feel this firmness or a nodule and a bump, obviously it’s very concerning,” Misiukiewicz said. “And those are the areas you can access. When it comes to the gum, the cancer can be hidden between the teeth, and most of the time it’s detected by the dentist.”

Once lesions become malignant, they can be very hard to treat; smaller lesions are much easier to remove, but as they grow larger in size, physicians have fewer tools to combat the spread of disease. According to the National Institutes of Health, approximately half of people with oral cancer will survive longer than five years past diagnosis.

Misiukiewicz noted that in countries where chewing tobacco is a bigger cultural practice – such as India, Bangladesh and Pakistan – rates of oral cancers are extremely high. He said the trend is concerning, especially given that many children in these nations will chew tobacco as well.

In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates smokeless tobacco use is much less prevalent with only 3.5 percent of individuals 12 and older using the substance; however, that still equates to 9 million people.

“The key point is just to stop smoking and stop chewing tobacco,” Misiukiewicz said. “If we let [people] continue with those habits, [they will] still expose themselves to carcinogens from tobacco.”

If you suspect issues from chewing tobacco or other tobaccos, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

FoxNews.com, photo courtesy of COPD Foundation


DENTAL VENEERS… AN INCREASINGLY POPULAR CHOICE FOR SMILE MAKEOVERS – NEWTON, WELLESLEY

22 May 2014

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, whom many have called, “Boston’s Best Prosthodontist” has seen his share of Boston’s most demanding people for smile makeovers. He reports that, “dental veneers have become a huge part of my practice and many people are still uncertain about the procedures and techniques utilized in this type of work”. Porcelain laminate veneers consist of a compilation of several thin ceramic layers which replace original tooth enamel, and an adhesive layer. To apply a veneer, a very small amount of the original tooth enamel must be removed, usually less than a millimeter. This is essential as it creates room for the porcelain veneer to fit within the mouth and most accurately restore natural tooth function while creating an even better appearance than the original tooth.

The bond between original tooth and porcelain veneer is critical as it not only provides the esthetic perfection desired, but also a strong bond which is essential for correct veneer function. Light-sensitive resin is placed between the original tooth and the veneer and then hardened using a special curing light.

Porcelain veneers are a very successful option in many situations where the original tooth has developed poor color, shape, and contours. It is also a good choice for fractured teeth, gaps between teeth, and in some situations where the tooth position is compromised and there are minor bite-related problems. For some people, superficial stains do not respond well to tooth whitening or bleaching. In these situations, a porcelain veneer may be the best option.

Since veneers are individually sculpted for each patient, it is nearly impossible to tell the difference between a veneer and a natural tooth. Unlike natural teeth, custom-made veneers resist coffee and tea stains, and cigarette smoke because they are made of high-tech materials.

With veneers—as opposed to crowns—your natural teeth remain largely intact with only a minimal amount being altered to fit the veneer.

For teeth that resist whitening, veneers can make even the darkest teeth appear bright white.

Dentists may also recommend veneers to quickly fix minor twists, overlaps, and small gaps.

Potential Veneer Downsides

Because a portion of the original tooth enamel is reduced, a veneer is not considered a reversible treatment. Although adjustments and even new veneers can be made, you can never reliably return to the original condition of the tooth.

Creating porcelain veneers requires some laboratory time, so expect at least a week before they’re ready to be applied.

After the porcelain veneers are attached you will probably have some sensitivity to hot and cold temperatures due to the removal of that thin layer of enamel. This typically disappears within a few days. In a healthy mouth properly treated with porcelain veneers—and where destructive forces are minimized or eliminated—a patient should be able to use porcelain veneers like his or her own teeth. Although they’re very strong, veneers are also brittle. You should avoid the same excessive stresses you would avoid with non-veneered teeth: don’t bite your fingernails, chew ice, or open beer bottles with your veneers!

Maintenance of a Porcelain Veneer

Maintaining porcelain veneers is actually quite simple: Treat them as you would your original teeth, with routine brushing and flossing. Using non-abrasive fluoride toothpaste will typically be suggested by your dental professional.

One week after your veneers are placed, you will be required to return to the office for a follow-up visit and evaluation so the dentist can see how your mouth is reacting to the veneers. Even if you feel the veneers are a success, this appointment is vital to your future oral health.

If you have a habit of grinding or clenching your teeth, your dentist may fit you with a nighttime bite guard so you do not damage your veneers.

You should also return to your dentist for regular professional maintenance because porcelain veneers should be polished with a specially formulated, non-abrasive paste, and because your dentist needs to inspect your dentistry for any sign of potential failure.

Courtesy of www.aacd.com


COSMETIC DENTISTRY FOR BETTER ‘SELFIES’ – NEWTON, WELLESLEY

16 May 2014

The ‘selfie’ phenomenon is taking off. Everyone is doing it, celebrities, kids, grandparents even the White House is getting in on the action. The quick snapshots have become the norm.

There are apps for it, songs about it and instructions on how to take the best selfie. The entity known as the selfie has a life of its own. In fact, the ‘selfie’ as well as social media, is having a large impact on cosmetic procedures and cosmetic dentistry.

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “More and more people are choosing teeth whitening, dental veneers and invisible fillings than ever before. More and more people are coming in for cosmetic dental procedures to enhance and improve their selfie, including teeth whitening and dental veneers. People see something on that photo that is concerning to them, bothering them, or something about their smile that they want to see look better”.

As a business person, or as a college graduate in job interview mode, you need to maintain your social media image and profile, as well as your public image. If you have recently viewed a picture of yourself from this new and unfamiliar angle, and are not happy with what you are seeing, it may be time for cosmetic dentistry. Brighter, straighter teeth give you a healthier, younger appearance.

A new study shows that the rise of ‘selfies’is having a huge impact on the cosmetic dentistry industry. Many of the people that are opting for cosmetic procedures are choosing to have the procedures done, not necessarily because the selfie made them concerned about something, but because they didn’t like the way the selfie presented the way they looked.

But, keep in mind: Another thing to remember– those selfie pics can be deceiving! The cameras on these smartphones are not made for taking close-up self-portraits, they’re made for wider group shots and landscape pictures. For more information on cosmetic dentistry procedures, contact Dr. Johnson at www.Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.com


WHEN WAS YOUR LAST DENTAL VISIT? NEWTON, WELLESLEY

30 April 2014

A new Gallup poll has revealed that 1 in 3 adults in the United States have not visited the dentist within the past year – a trend that has stayed mostly the same since 2008.

The survey is based on information gathered from interviews with more than 530,000 Americans aged 18 and older. Women were much more likely to have visited the dentist annually than men; among ethnic groups, 55 percent of blacks and Hispanics recalled visiting the dentist in the past year, compared to 70 percent of whites and Asians.

The biggest predictor of visiting the dentist was income. Individuals who made more than $120,000 a year were twice as likely to have visited the dentist than those who earn less than $12,000 a year.

According to recommendations from the American Dental Association, adults should visit the dentist at least once a year to lower the risk of oral disease. The poll found that 64.7 percent of Americans are meeting this minimum requirement.

Poor oral care is linked with a number of oral health issues, such as gingivitis and cavities. Recent studies have also found an association between poor oral hygiene with cardiovascular disease and stroke, likely due to dislodged oral bacteria entering the bloodstream.

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners reminds everyone that pro-action is less costly, less stressful and a smarter approach than reaction when addressing dental issues. So, remember to, “See a specialist…The difference will make you smile”.


WHAT IS A DENTAL IMPLANT? – NEWTON, WELLESLEY

24 April 2014

A dental implant is a prosthetic replacement for a missing tooth. Natural teeth consist of the crown and the root. The crown is the visible section that is covered with white enamel. Supporting the crown is the tooth root which extends into the jawbone. The root is the part of the tooth that is effectively replaced by an implant.

There are commonly three parts to what is described as an implant – the implant device itself (which is inserted directly into the bone); the abutment – the piece that connects the implant device to the third part – the overlying crown or denture.

Today’s implants are predominantly made of titanium, a metal that is bio-compatible and offers strength and durability as well as a unique property of fusing directly to bone – the process known as osseointegration. Osseointegration occurs when bone cells attach themselves directly to the titanium surface, essentially locking the implant into the jaw bone.

Other materials, such as zirconium, might be used to make implants in the future. But for now, these materials have not been perfected for general use.

For more information, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

osseo.org


DENTAL VENEERS IMPROVE YOUR SMILE AND YOUR MOUTH – WELLESLEY, NEWTON

22 April 2014

Porcelain veneers are routinely used to fix discolored teeth, stains from excessive fluoride, or to hide large resin fillings that have caused discoloration. Porcelain veneers can also treat worn, chipped, misaligned, uneven, irregularly shaped or gapped teeth as well. Additionally porcelain veneers require no more maintenance than your natural teeth.

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “With all the focus on brighter, whiter, perfect teeth, porcelain veneers are a great, long-term way to align and brighten smiles. Veneers are thin pieces of porcelain used to emulate the natural look of teeth. They are also able to provide the strength and resilience similar to natural tooth enamel”.

Porcelain veneers adhere right to the front of the teeth. Veneers are applied by removing a very tiny amount of the original tooth enamel. This allows room for the veneer to fit within the mouth and most accurately restore natural tooth function while creating an even better appearance than the original tooth. Veneers are then cemented to the tooth.

Placing custom veneers requires extreme technical skill and attention to cosmetic detail. A prosthodontist is the expert to choose when opting for cosmetic dental procedures because they have significantly training than traditional dentists. Dr. Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners educates his patients on procedures and options that will best fit your lifestyle and your mouth. An educated, well-informed patient will always be happier with their smile.

As a highly-skilled prosthodontic dentist, Dr. Johnson helps patients improve their mouth and their smile. At Newton Wellesley Dental Partners we individually sculpt every veneer to match our patients’ individual needs for better smiles. This customization makes it nearly impossible to tell the difference between a veneer and a natural tooth.

For more information, contact us.

PRweb.com


GET A HOLLYWOOD SMILE IN NEWTON & WELLESLEY, MA

11 April 2014

Hollywood is full of beautiful people with beautiful smiles. Perhaps this is why there has been such a focus on cosmetic dentistry over the last decade. As we see famous smiles we also see how a beautiful smile can affect our daily life. Actors pay top dollar for the best appearances with cosmetic surgeries, a stylist, jewelry, etc. But, as cosmetic dentistry procedures become more popular, thus more affordable, even everyday people can afford teeth whitening and dental veneers which can change the appearance of your teeth.

Here are a few of the ladies in the business with the best teeth and mega-watt smiles.

Julia Roberts

Probably best known for her smile, Julia Roberts has a mouth full of straight, bright white teeth that are the envy of women everywhere. Roberts is often cast as a happy-go-lucky woman, thanks to her infectious smile and boisterous laugh.

Jessica Alba

Thanks to a set of perfectly straight and symmetrical teeth, she is often at the top of the many “best smile” lists. Not only does she have great proportions, but her teeth look naturally white without seeming over-processed or fake.

Jessica Simpson

Known for her singing, soon enough Jessica Simpson began to be noticed for her beautiful smile. She has a smile that is contagious and shows off her attractive teeth.

Megan Fox

A good look at her smile explains why she is on this list. Her smile is just as eye catching as the rest of her body and photographs equally as well.

Halle Berry

Halle Berry is basically flawless from head to toe and her teeth are no exception. Her smile is equally proportioned to highlight her petite features and porcelain skin. Luckily, Halle keeps her hair cropped short so that everyone can see her award-winning smile.

Anne Hathaway

Some people have called Anne Hathaway’s smile the next Julia Roberts, and for good reason. Her wide grin shows off two rows of white teeth that are perfectly suited to her features.

Celebrities have access to some of the top dental care around, and in Boston, the ‘go-to-guy’ is Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. He has a ‘who’s who’ client list and is responsible for the smiles of many TV personalities, politicians, corporate executives and international models, but getting their white smiles can be just as easy for you, too. Contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners and get one thing in common with these Hollywood ladies; the confidence to show off your teeth with a beautiful smile. Feeling good with the smile you have and taking good care of your teeth is all that is needed to turn heads.


BRUSH YOUR TEETH AFTER YOUR EASTER DUNKIN’ DONUTS TREAT – NEWTON, WELLESLEY

26 March 2014

Don’t tell your dentist, but Dunkin’ Donuts is planning to debut a special Peeps donut just in time for the Easter holiday. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, advises patients to enjoy these holiday treats but to remember that, “it’s not what you eat but what you do AFTER that matters”!

Executive chef and vice president of product innovation Stan Frankenthaler recently revealed that the marshmallow topped donuts will be available at participating stores starting on Monday, March 31.

The sugary Easter-themed treats will be flower shaped and will come in two flavors: strawberry icing with green drizzle and green icing with strawberry drizzle. How much fun is that!

So, Happy Easter to all. Enjoy your Peeps, jelly beans and chocolate. But be sure to brush several times each day, floss nightly and visit your dentist regularly to maintain good oral health. For additional blogs and more information about Dr. Johnson, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com

Image – Dunkin Donuts


DENTAL VENEERS – SOME CELEBRITIES LOOK HOT, SOME DO NOT – NEWTON, WELLESLEY

13 March 2014

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, Prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, whom many have called Boston’s best prosthodontist, “The use of dental veneers, a cosmetic procedure for a more beautiful smile, is on the rise with celebrities”. As a result of Hollywood’s influence and because cosmetic dentistry has become more affordable for ‘regular people,’ more and more people are choosing to improve and enhance their smiles with dental veneers as well.

While some celebrities have managed to create a sensation with their new look, others haven’t hit the bull’s eye with their veneers. The procedure involves using a thin layer of porcelain which is placed over your tooth, either to improve the appearance of a tooth or to protect damage to your tooth’s surface.

If veneers are done well, the result is a radiant, natural-looking white smile which can transform your face and appearance along with your self-confidence.

Here are some of the best and the worst celebrity veneers:

Who’s hot?

  • Cheryl Cole: Cheryl Cole has openly admitted to having veneers fitted. They look fantastic and have completely transformed the shape of her face, as well as giving her the perfect celebrity smile.
  • Zac Efron: Looking at Efron’s teeth, he too has undergone cosmetic treatment. His veneers are very natural looking, fitting the size of his mouth perfectly – a great smile.
  • Jessica Simpson: Jessica Simpson has gorgeous white teeth. By looking at her smile, one can tell that she may have had a few veneers fitted to really make her smile stand out, resulting in a gorgeous smile.

Who’s veneers are not?

  • Rylan Clarke: Rylan has undergone a complete teeth transformation using veneers to create a bold smile. Looking at his smile, he has had a full mouth of veneers fitted and unfortunately the result, is very unnatural and over the top.
  • Katie Price: Katie Price is another example of someone who has chosen veneers that are too white, making her smile look false and unnatural.
  • Cher Lloyd: Cher Lloyd has had the full Hollywood smile makeover and again, this is an unnatural looking smile. The veneers look to be a little too large for her mouth; accentuating the fact that she has veneers and making her smile look unnatural.

If you are interested in dental veneers, do your homework when choosing a cosmetic dentist. Ask question and discuss your options. You may or may not need a full-set of veneers. Also, you want to be sure you choose a dentist who matches your new shade of teeth with your hair, skin and eye coloring.

For more information on choosing a dentist for dental veneers, contact visit, NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com and remember to, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile”.

business-standard.com / Image from Zee News


EVIDENCE SHOWS A POSSIBLE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SECONDHAND SMOKE AND DENTAL DECAY IN CHILDREN – NEWTON

3 March 2014

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “another important study demonstrates a relationship between smoking & dental disease”.

‘Heathy People 2020’, state that, “the prevalence of caries (cavities) in American children aged 3-5 years was 33% and in children 6-9 years it was 54%. The objective of the U.S. department of Health and Human Services is to reduce the prevalence of caries in children by 10% by 2020”.

However, a recent study done by conducted at Tufts University in Boston looked at the possible effects of second hand smoking (SHS) in children. In 14 case-controlled studies, consisting of 101,552 participants, investigators found a likely association between SHS and caries in children’s primary (baby) teeth. The researchers adjusted for low socioeconomic status and other factors. Their findings suggest that additional research is necessary to draw a conclusive outcome.

As dentistry moves from treatment of caries to prevention and risk-based medical management, it becomes more important to understand behaviors that are associated with a higher risk of developing tooth decay; perhaps this correlation will affect smokers in a positive way.

For additional information visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org and remember to, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile”.

Original article in JADA , February 2014


DENTAL INFECTIONS COULD BE ASSOCIATED WITH ANEURYSMS

26 February 2014

While bacterial infections have been associated with a number of serious medical conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, their role in cerebrovascular disorders has not been fully understood to date Now, researchers from have suggested that infections due to oral and pharyngeal bacteria could be a risk factor for ruptured intracranial aneurysms.

In the study, the researchers obtained 36 ruptured aneurysm specimens which were examined for the presence of bacterial DNA from various oral species.

The researchers found bacterial DNA in 21 specimens. DNA from endodontic bacteria was detected in 20 specimens and from periodontal bacteria in 17 of the samples. Bacterial DNA of the streptococcus militis group has been found to be the most common.

According to the researchers, the study is the first to provide evidence that dental infections could be associated with intracranial aneurysm disease and the rupture of brain aneurysms in particular.

To make a dental appointment, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. And, remember “see a specialist, the difference will make you smile.”

American Dental Association newsletter


DENTISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY MEET – NEWTON, WESTON, WELLESLEY

19 February 2014

Are you aware that three dimensional technology is being used routinely in dentistry? According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, whom many have regarded as Boston’s Best Prosthodontist, “today we use 3-D applications in a wide variety of dental procedures. Dentistry is finally catching up with the large, technology firms that have been using this technology for 20 years. From simple procedures like a hard, night-guard to sophisticated cases using implants, the use of 3-D software and CAD/CAM hardware allows dentistry to be done with incredible precision”.

Do you know that 3-D dental xrays (Cone Beam Computer Tomography) are utilized to better-diagnosis and treatment planning? How is CBCT Being Used?

Dental Implants. Panoramic x-ray has been used for years for implant placement and extractions, but it is 2-D, and has 13 percent visual distortion.

Cone-beam improves selection of implant size and type, confirms the correct angle and depth of placement in the alveolar bone, as well as the amount of bone present. Some machines even assess bone density. The DICOM 3 compliant images can be dropped into programs for implant treatment pre-planning and for the placement of implants.

Dental Extractions. Oral surgeons don’t like surprises when they are operating: Where is the root of that bicuspid; is it up in the sinus? How complicated is that wisdom tooth going to be; what is the involvement with adjoining teeth and tooth roots? A CBCT study may guide surgical access to a tooth without damaging other vital structures, especially avoiding the inferior alveolar nerve canal in the lower mandible to minimize numbness.

Orthodontia. For better overall treatment planning and avoiding mistakes, CBCT provides a lot more information for arch size crowding, unerupted teeth, impacted teeth and jaw asymmetry.

Other maxillofacial uses for CBCT include TMJ therapy. orthognathic surgery, fractures, and jaw pathology.

Do you know that 3-D printing/milling is used to create ceramic crowns and metal fillings?

Watch this video to get some background on this printing technology.

Watch this video to see CAD/CAM impressions being taken.

In short, if your dentist has not incorporated advanced, 3-Dimensional technology into his/her practice, why not? For the latest, cutting edge dental therapy in a sophisticated setting, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com and remember to, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile”.


WHAT HAPPENS IF YOU DON’T BRUSH AND FLOSS REGULARLY – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, WESTON, BROOKLINE

17 February 2014

A lot of Americans can’t ever find the time to take care of their teeth. In fact, about half don’t floss daily, and one in five don’t brush twice daily — so you’re not alone.

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “you may want to reconsider. Taking care of your teeth and gums isn’t just about preventing cavities or bad breath. The mouth is a gateway into your body’s overall health”.

It’s almost impossible to prove a cause-effect relationship between dental neglect and various conditions. But there’s mounting evidence that shows an association between poor dental hygiene and a wide variety of illnesses. You should visit the dentist at least twice a year, and it is recommended that you brush at least twice a day and floss once a day. If you choose to ignore the advice, you’ll get cavities, but here are other things you’re at risk of, some more common than others.

Gum disease

Most people don’t realize this, but your gums are not supposed to bleed when you brush and floss. If yours do, you probably have gum disease — or are at least well on your way. Gingivitis, the milder form of gum disease, makes gums red, swollen, and quick-to-bleed — part of a response to the bacteria in the plaque that builds up between your teeth and gums. More than half of Americans have gingivitis.

If plaque spreads, the immune response heightens and can destroy tissues and bones in the mouth, creating pockets between the teeth that can become infected. (Other conditions unrelated to oral hygiene habits can also have these effects.) At this severe stage, gum disease is called periodontitis, and it can become chronic.

Tooth loss

If you’ve never worried about losing your teeth, you should start. Adults 20 to 64 have lost an average of seven (permanent) teeth, and 10% of Americans between 50 and 64 have absolutely no teeth left. Both cavities and gum disease can end in tooth loss.

Bad breath

Bad breath may affect as much as 65% of the population. A number of conditions can have halitosis as a symptom, but the number one by far is poor oral hygiene. Food particles that linger long after meals can start to stink, and the less you brush and floss, the more potentially malodorous bacteria build up in your mouth. The coating on your tongue is also a key contributor to bad breath, and some research has suggested that cleaning your tongue — along with regular brushing and flossing, of course — may help reign in this problem.

Dementia

A large, long-term study suggests that there may be a link between poor dental health and dementia, although it’s possible that people with better oral hygiene have better health habits in general. Researchers followed 5,468 people for 18 years and found that those “who reported not brushing their teeth daily had a 22% to 65% greater risk of dementia than those who brushed three times daily.” In addition, a small study found that the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s had more bacteria associated with gum disease than did those belonging to the cognitively healthy.

Pneumonia

When pathogens lurk in your mouth, you inhale them right into your lungs, where they can wreak all kinds of havoc. One major review pointed to this process as the reason for an association between poor oral hygiene and hospital-acquired pneumonia. Improving oral hygiene reduced the incidence of such pneomonia by 40%.

Erectile dysfunction

A connection between dental disease and erectile dysfunction may seem remote, but preliminary research suggests that the conditions could be linked. They both have been tied to Vitamin D deficiency, smoking, and general inflammation, but the exact reason for the association is still a mystery. One study found that periodontitis impaired penis function. In a group of patients between 30 and 40, 53% of those with erectile dysfunction had severe periodontitis, while only 23% of those without ED did. “We think that it will be of benefit to consider periodontal disease as a causative clinical condition of ED in such patients,” the authors wrote.

Diabetes

Dentists have long known that diabetes is a risk factor for periodontitis, but now research is beginning to indicate that the relationship may be bidirectional. Extremely poor dental health may also be a risk factor for insulin resistance (often called “pre-diabetes”) and diabetes, largely because it increases inflammation. Some studies have even indicated that in patients with both conditions, reigning in periodontitis may improve diabetes control.

Kidney disease

About 3.7% of U.S. adults have chronic kidney disease, but certain people are more at risk. People with periodontal disease were 4.5 times more likely to have chronic kidney disease, making poor dental health a stronger predictor for CKD than high cholesterol. Adults with no remaining teeth were also 11 times more likely to have chronic kidney disease.

Heart disease

Multiple studies have suggested that there may be a connection between gum disease and heart disease, both of which are associated with inflammation. “Adding oral health self-care… is prudent to improve patients’ oral health and possibly reduces [coronary heart disease],” concluded one study. “Periodontal disease caused by pathogen bacteria… could represent one of several possible causal factors of heart disease,” concluded another.

The authors of a review recommended that periodontal disease be considered a marker of risk for heart disease, independent of traditional risk factors — even though they noted a lack of evidence demonstrating a causal relationship.

But a scientific statement from the American Heart Association in 2012 urged caution: Periodontal disease and heart disease share many underlying risk factors; there’s no reason to think that dental problems directly cause heart disease; and treating periodontitis reduces inflammation but does nothing to alter the course of heart disease, the authors concluded.

Pregnancy complications

Gingivitis affects 60 to 75% of pregnant women, and it’s especially important that expectant mothers tend to their teeth. When pregnant women have serious dental problems, their infants are more likely to develop cavities. Poor maternal oral health is also associated with low birth weight and preterm birth, although there’s not enough evidence yet to know whether it’s an independent risk factor. Researchers suspect that one of two mechanisms may be at play: Either overall inflammation is heightened, or oral bacteria that enter the bloodstream eventually colonize the placenta, causing an inflammatory response.

Ulcers

In people with periodontitis, the plaque that forms in the pockets beneath the gum line can become a reservoir for Helicobacter pylori, the bacterium that is asymptomatic in most but is responsible for stomach ulcers when it flares up. Helicobacter pylori can be transmitted orally, and large epidemiological studies have found a positive association between periodontitis and a positive test for the bacterium, which is also a risk factor for stomach cancer.

Cancer

“Recent evidence suggests that the extent and severity of periodontal disease and tooth loss may be associated with an increased risk of malignant disease,” concluded one researcher, suggesting an association between poor oral health and cancer. Gum disease and dental problems are also associated with HPV, which causes up to 80% of oral cancers.

For More information contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. And remember, “See a Specialist, the Difference will Make You Smile.”

businessinsider.com


YOUR SMILE AFFECTS YOUR PERSONAL, DATING, AND PROFESSIONAL LIFE – WELLESLEY, NEWTON, WESTON

7 February 2014

More than one-third of American adults are unhappy with their smile, according to a new study commissioned by the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO). Of Americans who are unhappy with the appearance of their teeth, 36% believe they would have a better social life or better job success if they had better teeth. This may be especially true among young adults. In fact, 48% of Americans ages 18 to 24 have untagged a picture of themselves on Facebook because they didn’t like their smile.

As Valentine’s Day approaches, you may find interesting that a study found that bad teeth also represented the biggest dating turn-off among men and women. According to the study, 77% of women think crooked teeth are worse than a receding hairline in a potential love interest. Moreover, 22% of Americans who are unhappy with their smile think that better teeth would lead to a better love live. On a professional level, 78% of Americans perceive adults with crooked teeth to be unsuccessful. And 14% of those unhappy with their teeth felt that they might be missing out on a better job.

Professional orthodontic and prosthetic treatments have come a long way in recent years, with innovative options such as dental veneers, in-office teeth whitening, Invisalign and other cosmetic dentistry procedures. Healthy teeth can be moved at any age and it’s encouraging that two-thirds of Americans think they are never too old for treatment. For more information on improving your smile and your life, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. And remember, “See a Specialist, the Difference will Make You Smile.”

orthodonticproductsonline.com


COSMETIC DENTISTRY FOR IMPROVED SELF-CONFIDENCE – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, WESTON, BROOKLINE

3 February 2014

Stained, chipped and imperfect teeth can keep you from feeling confident in your appearance and smile and can certainly affect the way people perceive you . According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, who many consider Boston’s Best Prosthodontist, “Cosmetic dentistry, specifically teeth whitening and dental veneers, can make your teeth more attractive and help transform the way you look and feel about yourself. Imperfections in teeth can happen as a result of genetics, accidents, habits and age. Staining occurs from what you eat and drink and from smoking. As a result, many are challenged with what they believe to be an unattractive smile.

Dr. Johnson is committed to helping patients who want to improve their appearance and their smiles, and improve their self-confidence. For unparalleled cosmetic dentistry with a range of restorative treatments and cosmetic services, seeking the help of a prosthodontist promises that you will walk away with a beautiful, natural looking, self-confident smile. For stained or discolored teeth, in-office teeth whitening is longer lasting and more effective than over-the-counter products (similar to the difference in pain-medications ie. Tylenol vs Vicoden).

At Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, teeth whitening begins in the office, then continues at home with custom designed, precise fitting teeth whitening trays. Dental veneers are a cosmetic dentistry solution for chipped, malpositioned or stained teeth. Dental veneers are thin, tooth-shaped porcelain that are permanently adhered to the front of each tooth. With the proper care, dental veneers can last up to 30 years. For an easy, long-term solution for issues like crookedness, chips, gaps and stains, “See a Specialist…the difference will make you smile”

Make 2014 the year you take charge. Improve your smile and your confidence with cosmetic dentistry by Dr. Ryne Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. Contact us.


DENTAL PROCEDURES AND QUESTIONS ABOUT SAFE PRACTICES – WELLESLEY, NEWTON

22 January 2014

The tragic death of 3-year-old Finley Boyle—a girl from Hawaii who fell into a coma from a dental procedure gone horribly wrong—has raised questions about safe dentistry practices.

“It was topic number one at our dental board meeting this week,” said president-elect of the American Association of Dental Boards. The group, which represents dental boards from every state, received an update on the case from the head of the Hawaii dental board.

“We’d like to ultimately determine what went wrong and whether lessons can be learned from the case to improve safety in every state,” Paul said.

While the full investigation into the death has not yet been completed, the little girl went into cardiac arrest while under sedation during a root canal procedure. Her parents filed a lawsuit alleging that the improper medications with incorrect dosages were administered to the girl, according to CNN, and that the dentist had no plan in place to respond to medical emergencies involving anesthesia.

Whether Hawaii dental board regulations were violated remains under investigation. When the incident occurred, the lawsuit contends, dental staff failed to administer medications to counteract the anesthesia drugs and had to seek help from a pediatrician down the hall to administer cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Massachusetts state law requires dentists and dental hygienists to be certified in CPR and get recertified every two years. Dentists who administer anesthesia during treatment—beyond a local anesthetic to numb the gum—must obtain both a facility permit and a permit for the dentist administering the anesthesia that includes emergency plans and patient monitoring during the administration of the sedatives. The state last updated its rules for administering dental anesthesia in 2010, Paul said.

Often in cases where a major medical emergency occurs during a dental procedure, state rules weren’t being followed. “A main mission of state dental boards is to deal with dentists who violate the rules,” said Paul, who previously served as chairperson of the state Board of Registration in Dentistry. “They may be ignorant of the law or just choose not to pay attention to the rules.”

boston.com


JAW PAIN CAN BE A HEART ATTACK SYMPTOM – BOSTON, WELLESLEY, NEWTON

15 January 2014

Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners wants everyone to know that, “Jaw pain or a toothache can be a sign of an impending heart attack”. Myocardial Infarction is the number one killer of both men and women in the U.S. Each year, about 1.1 million Americans suffer a heart attack, and 460,000 of these are fatal. Most of the deaths from heart attacks are caused by ventricular fibrillation of the heart that occurs before the victim of the heart attack can reach an emergency room. Those who reach the emergency room have an excellent prognosis; survival from a heart attack with modern treatment should exceed 90%. In order to optimally benefit heart attack victims and limit the extent of heart damage, treatments to open blocked arteries should be given early during a heart attack.

Knowing the early warning signs of heart attack is critical for prompt recognition and treatment. Many heart attacks start slowly, unlike the dramatic portrayal often seen in the movies. A person experiencing a heart attack may not even be sure of what is happening. Heart attack symptoms vary among individuals, and even a person who has had a previous heart attack may have different symptoms in a subsequent heart attack. Although chest pain or pressure is the most common symptom of a heart attack, heart attack victims may experience a diversity of symptoms that include:

  • pain, fullness, and/or squeezing sensation of the chest;
  • jaw pain, toothache, headache;
  • shortness of breath;
  • nausea, vomiting, and/or general epigastric (upper middle abdomen) discomfort;
  • sweating;
  • heartburn and/or indigestion;
  • arm pain (more commonly the left arm, but may be either arm);
  • upper back pain;
  • general malaise (vague feeling of illness); and
  • no symptoms (approximately one quarter of all heart attacks are silent, without chest pain or new symptoms and silent heart attacks are especially common among patients with diabetes mellitus).

Even though the symptoms of a heart attack at times can be vague and mild, it is important to remember that heart attacks producing no symptoms or only mild symptoms can be just as serious and life-threatening as heart attacks that cause severe chest pain. Too often patients attribute heart attack symptoms to “indigestion,” “fatigue,” or “stress,” and consequently delay seeking prompt medical attention. One cannot overemphasize the importance of seeking prompt medical attention in the presence of symptoms that suggest a heart attack. Early diagnosis and treatment saves lives, and delays in reaching medical assistance can be fatal.

Original story: MedicineNet.com


DR. JOHNSON SELECTED FOR BEST OF BOSTON WEDDING EVENT

7 January 2014

Boston Magazine has selected Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners as its sole dental representative for the annual, Best of Boston Wedding event to be held in January 2014. This event brings together the winners of the 2013 Best of Boston Award in the wedding industry and brides-to-be in the Boston area. At this reception, the winners will be honored and wedding party attendees will meet and mingle with industry professionals to interact with leading wedding planners. Dr. Johnson will be discussing cosmetic enhancements to prepare the bridal party (and parents) for ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ photos.

Dr. Johnson, regarded by many as Boston’s Best Prosthodontist, has a practice with a world class reputation for outstanding dental aesthetics. He sees many of Boston’s elite media personalities, athletes and top corporate executives who seek and expect excellence. Dr. Johnson has been seen in many top magazines including GQ, Vanity Fair, Mr. Sid and has been spotted on Fox News, CNN, HGTV and A&E.

To view Boston Magazine weddings, click here: http://www.bostonmagazine.com/weddings/


COSMETIC DENTISTRY TO IMPROVE YOUR SMILE AND YOUR LIFE – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, WESTON

6 January 2014

Cosmetic dentistry improves the overall appearance of your teeth. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, Prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “While there are issues that relate to one’s overall health, there several other benefits: such as improved self-esteem and self-confidence, and a beautiful smile that makes a lasting, positive first impression”.

The cosmetic dentistry performed by Dr. Johnson has helped numerous patients to improve their confidence with a few modifications to their teeth. These patients have achieved a smile they never thought possible. Many of his patients are public personalities and sports figures, however, many are people who want to improve their smiles in order to get the new job, promotion or improve their quality of life.

Porcelain veneers, teeth whitening and dental implants are just a few of the procedures to make your smile what you want it to be in 2014. This year, make the change to improve your life with cosmetic dentistry and make your smile last forever. With the rising popularity of cosmetic dentistry the procedures have become more attainable. Dr. Johnson believes in educating you on all the procedures that would work for you so that you can make the best and most informed decision. Dr. Johnson has been regarded as a pioneer in the use of CAD/CAM in his dental work which improves the longevity and aesthetics of his work. Cosmetic dentistry varies from traditional dentistry, so it is important that you choose a dentist with a great reputation and who is educated in the most recent technologies.

For an expert in aesthetic dentistry for that stunning smile using the latest technologies and techniques contact Dr. Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. And remember to, “See a Specialist, the Difference will Make you Smile.”


A PERFECT SMILE THROUGH COSMETIC DENTISTRY – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, WESTON

26 December 2013

With magazines, billboards, and television, perfect, white smiles are all around us. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Cosmetic dental procedures are becoming more and more popular every year.

Beautiful teeth aren’t just for celebrities anymore. Cosmetic dentistry is no longer a luxury, but a viable and reasonable option for anyone wanting to improve their smile”. There are a number of reasons a patient might opt for cosmetic dentistry.

From traumatic injuries to permanent stains to missing or gapped teeth, cosmetic dentistry can help even the toughest cases. You don’t have to wish for the perfect smile any longer. Dr. Ryne Johnson can transform your teeth and give you the smile you’ve always wanted.

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners offers an array of cosmetic dentistry services, from bonding and contouring to dental veneers and teeth whitening. Always dreamed of a dazzling smile? Tired of noticing coffee stains on your teeth? You don’t have to put up with stained or yellowing teeth any longer. More than ever it is very important to have dazzling white teeth and a beautiful smile. Teeth whitening and bleaching have become very popular options for patients over the last few years. It’s a simple procedure that over time whitens and brightens your teeth. Patients have been immensely happy with the results.

If you’re tired of having crooked teeth but don’t want to spend a couple years wearing braces, then look no further than dental veneers. A cosmetic option that has grown in popularity, dental veneers are thin shells that are permanently adhered to the front of your teeth, producing a flawless, straight smile. Patients have been extremely satisfied with dental veneers. The procedure is simple and painless, and often requires little to no anesthesia. This is the perfect solution for adult patients who want to improve the appearance of their teeth but don’t want braces or invasive dental procedures.

For more information on cosmetic dentistry, contact Dr. Ryne Johnson. And remember, “See a Specialist, The Difference Will Make You Smile”.

einnews.com


FIRST IMPRESSIONS ARE MADE WITH YOUR SMILE – NEWTON, WESTON, WELLESLEY

17 December 2013

Is 2014 the year you are going to change your life. Maybe look for a new job, a new love, a new look? The start with a new smile. According to a survey for the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, first positive impressions all come down to the power of an attractive smile. So, when it comes to a coveted job interview, candidates should flash those pearly whites to make a positive impression.

The study says that 48% of adults think a smile is the most memorable feature after they meet someone for the first time. This is even more powerful than the spoken word which raked in 25% of respondents. The way someone dresses pulled in 9% and the way someone smells got 8% of respondents. It’s pretty close across generations since 52% of adults older than 50 and 45% of the 18-49 demographic are most likely to remember a smile after they’re introduced to someone for the first time. That said, it’s not just any smile that gets remembered. It has to be attractive in order to be equated with a positive first impression. So, how does one define an appealing smile?

Well, the survey revealed that some Americans view people differently if they have crooked or stained teeth. That’s viewed as less attractive, according to 37% of respondents. In fact, 25% of survey participants indicated people were viewed as less confident than people with “perfect” teeth. Other than the tip to smile at a networking event, job interview, and anything related to first impressions, the survey can serve as a reminder to smile online as well for your professional headshot for all of your social media profiles.

To put your best smile forward in 2014, contact Dr. Ryne Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.com and remember to, “See a Specialist, the Difference will Make you Smile.”


PROFESSIONAL TEETH WHITENING FOR CONFIDENT HOLIDAY SMILES – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, WESTON

5 December 2013

Since medieval times, people have sought to enhance their smile and over the past 50 years, teeth whitening procedures have been the simplest and least-costly way to make a smile ‘pop’. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, often regarded as Boston’s Best Prosthodontist, “ Professional teeth whitening is superior to at-home kits, and the American Dental Association recommends that anyone considering whitening their teeth should consult their dentist before undergoing any procedure”.

Those undergoing at home teeth whitening may not be aware of the risks and side effects of the ingredients contained in the kit. It is important to consult a dentist to determine if you are a candidate for teeth whitening. Additionally, over-the-counter material does not have the same concentration or strength as the dentist-supervised material. Since 1986, Dr. Ryne Johnson, has provided professional teeth whitening services to his patients. In fact, Dr. Johnson was one of the earlier lecturers on this topic.

Choosing in-office teeth whitening has many benefits beyond over-the-counter-whiteners. People are attracted to the convenience of store-bought whiteners, but what consumers don’t realize is that whitening the teeth in this way can actually make them look worse. Store-bought whitening kits can sometimes be effective only on certain sections of the teeth. Many people find that at-home whiteners leave spots on their teeth and the results can be disastrous, making you very uncomfortable with your smile. Instead of uniform dull teeth, the you could be left with part of your teeth that are white while the rest of the teeth are not. There are numerous advantages to selecting professional teeth whitening. First, dentists use high quality, prescription grade ingredients in their gels that are not available over the counter. Second, dental professionals have access to equipment that is only sold to licensed practitioners. At-home whitening kits come with risks. “one of the do-it-yourself kits are customized to the patient. This can result in ill-fitting trays and strips, which in turn can cause pain and severe irritation of the gums.

As for the overall benefits of teeth whitening, having a whiter smile can improve a patient’s general appearance and confidence. “For many of our patients, improving their appearance is just as important as good dental health. When they come to us to brighten their teeth, it gives us the opportunity to boost their entire quality of life. Seeing their dazzling white smile is the best reward.” For more information or to schedule a consultation, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, and remember to, “See a Specialist, the Difference will Make you Smile.”


12 USES FOR TOOTHPASTE

25 November 2013

There’s one cheap product everybody owns (or should own!) that has a bunch of clever uses around the house: toothpaste. It contains mild abrasives and detergents mixed with creamy thickening agents that keep your teeth clean and bright. We tried it and found that those same ingredients can help you MacGyver solutions to a number of messes without resorting to expensive specialized products that just end up in a cluttered pile under your kitchen sink. Don’t use colored toothpaste or gels for any of the following tasks because they could leave stains. Grab a plain old tube of white — it just might become your new favorite home care product.

1. Polish jewelry. Apply a thin film of toothpaste to dull stones or tarnished metal with a soft toothbrush or cloth. Polish gently, rinse with water, and dry. If the tarnishing is heavy, apply a thicker coat and let it sit for an hour. Do not use toothpaste on pearls, turquoise, vintage Bakelite, or vintage rhinestones, which have softer surfaces and might get scratched.

2. Remove carpet stains. Scrub stains with a toothbrush and toothpaste. Blot with a damp cloth. Be sure to test a small section of carpet to make sure the dye doesn’t come off.

3. Clean up scratched DVDs and CDs. Gently dab a small amount of toothpaste on the scratch with a cloth and buff from the center of the disk outward toward the rim. Rinse with water and dry with a microfiber cloth.

4. Spiff up sneakers. If the rubber soles of your favorite kicks are getting scuffed, scrub them with toothpaste using a toothbrush or nailbrush. Ditto for white leather shoes. Be sure to do a patch test with white canvas.

5. Banish water rings on furniture. You forgot to use a coaster. Gently buff away the water ring with a small dab of toothpaste and a soft, slightly damp cloth. You may have to repeat the process a couple of times but don’t use too much pressure and overscrub. Test on antique wood to make sure you don’t damage the finish.

6. Clean the inside of grimy water bottles, baby bottles, and thermoses. We try to be green and reuse bottles, but what about when they get all gross with mysterious and unappetizing scum? Scrub with a narrow bottlebrush and toothpaste, and rinse thoroughly with hot water.

7. Defog. Rub a small amount of toothpaste around the inside of goggles or a diving mask and rinse thoroughly. Do not use on goggles with special coatings such as antiglare treatments.

8. Lift collar stains. Tackle those ugly gray stains around the collars of shirts with toothpaste and a toothbrush. Rinse and launder.

9. Scrub your nails. Manicures are great until the colored polish comes off and your nails look dingy and discolored. If your nails are stained and yellow, scrub with toothpaste applied to a nailbrush to regain their glow.

10. Patch small holes in walls. Fill thumbtack holes in drywall with a little smear of toothpaste. Smooth over the filled hole with a piece of cardboard such as a playing card. Repeat if toothpaste shrinks when it dries.

11. Deodorize your hands. Wash your hands with a squirt of toothpaste if you have been cutting garlic or onions. Do not use toothpaste on burns or on your face to clear up pimples. Despite old wives’ tales and Internet advice on the efficacy of toothpaste and skin care, it contains detergents, menthol, and possible allergens, all of which could be irritants.

12. Polish the faucet. A quick toothpaste scrub gets your chrome bathroom accessories shiny again. Just don’t overdo it — chrome plate can get worn away over time.

While toothpaste is gentler than a traditional cleaning scrub like Comet, it typically contains about 50% abrasive materials. With all this inspiration, it may be tempting to run around with an industrial-sized tube scrubbing stains and scuffs with abandon, but start with small patches and dab, rub, and buff with a light touch.

Image and Article – Yahoo! Shine


KEEPING YOUR MOUTH HEALTHY DURING PREGNANCY – NEWTON, WELLESLEY

20 November 2013

Good oral health is an important part of good overall health, which is especially important during pregnancy. By paying attention to your oral hygiene and eating habits, you can go a long way toward keeping your mouth healthy. Your dentist also can help you take care of your teeth and gingivae (gums) during this special time.

Practice Good Oral Hygiene

Daily care of your teeth and mouth is the foundation of oral health. The American Dental Association offers the following advice for developing a good oral hygiene routine:

  • Brush your teeth gently twice a day with a soft-bristled toothbrush and a toothpaste containing fluoride.
  • The size and shape of your brush should fit your mouth, allowing you to reach all areas easily.
  • Replace your toothbrush every three or four months or sooner if the bristles are frayed. A worn toothbrush won’t do a good job of cleaning your teeth and can irritate your gums.
  • Clean between your teeth with floss or another interdental cleaner daily. This helps remove the thin layer of bacteria (plaque) that forms on your teeth and food particles from between your teeth and under the gumline.
  • Look for the ADA Seal of Acceptance on the oral health products that you buy. The Seal indicates that the product is safe and effective when used as directed.

Eat a healthy diet made up of various foods from the following groups: grains, vegetables, fruits, dairy products, protein, and fats or oils. Try to limit your snacking. Each time you consume foods or beverages that contain sugar, the bacteria in your mouth release acids that attack your teeth, increasing your risk of developing tooth decay (cavities).

Visit your Dentist

If your last dental visit took place more than six months ago, or if you are experiencing any oral health problems, schedule an appointment to see your dentist. Your dentist may check the oral cavity for problems such as tooth decay, swollen or bleeding gums and sores elsewhere in the mouth, as well as for signs of infection or trauma. As part of a full examination, your dentist may need to take radiographs (x-rays). Oral health care, including the use of x-rays, pain medication and local anesthesia, is safe throughout pregnancy.

Although the radiation from dental x-rays is very low, your dentist will cover you with a leaded apron to shield your abdomen and thyroid. Some special oral health problems also arise during pregnancy that may require professional treatment. For example, hormonal changes can affect your gums, causing swelling or tenderness. Your gums also may bleed a little when you brush or floss. This condition is called gingivitis. The gum tissue itself also can develop one or more red, raw-looking lumps that usually have a bumpy texture. These are called “pregnancy tumors” but are not related to cancer. These lumps typically go away after the baby is born; however, because they can interfere with eating and thorough brushing and flossing, your dentist may suggest removing them.

To provide the best care, your dentist will need some information about your overall health and your pregnancy. He or she may ask these questions:

  • How many weeks pregnant are you? When is your due date?
  • What, if any, over-the-counter or prescription medications are you taking?
  • Do you have swollen or bleeding gums, a toothache (pain), problems eating or chewing food, or other problems in your mouth?

Make a commitment to good oral health during your pregnancy: practice good daily oral hygiene, adopt healthy eating habits and make regular visits to your dentist.For more information contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

JADA


DENTAL TREATMENTS IMPROVE PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL LIVES – NEWTON

15 November 2013

A new study was recently conducted that focused on adult individuals who had recent dental treatment. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “The results of the survey showed that adult cosmetic dental treatment contributed to significant improvements in both personal and professional lives”.

75% of those surveyed attributed their improved personal or career relationships to newfound self-confidence and their new smile. 92% of the respondents would suggest dental treatment to others. Before treatment, patients were concerned with questions such as “Am I too old?”, “How will I look?” and “What will others think?” However, after their dental treatment, an overwhelming majority no longer had such concerns.

This survey shows that a healthy, beautiful smile can be a critical factor when it comes to personal and professional success. Adults are seeking treatment in record numbers and Dr. Ryne Johnson encourages anyone, at any age, to consult a prosthodontist to learn if they could benefit from treatment. It’s never too late to have healthy teeth.

From 2010 to 2012, there has been an increase of 14% in adult patients, ages 18 and older, which is a record high. More adult men were also reported to be seeking dental treatment, according to the study. In 2012 survey results, 44% of adult patients were male; a 29% increase from the 2010 results. In fact, Dr. Johnson was just quoted in GQ magazine discussing men’s oral health.

For more information, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, or visit, www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org and remember, “See a Specialist, the Difference will Make you Smile.”

SBWire


YOUR SMILE CAN HELP YOU LOOK YOUNGER – NEWTON, WELLESLEY

8 November 2013

Everyone sees physical changes with age. Unfortunately, your teeth are not immune to aging either. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, Prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Age can bring many changes in your smile. While skin experiences a loss of elasticity and collagen, the teeth and gums go through age-related wear and tear, which can accentuate an aged appearance. The signs of an aging smile are tooth color, wear and loss of gum tissue. However, age does not have to show in your smile and your smile does not have to show your age. Your smile does not have to make you look older, in fact, it can make you look younger. With the right dental treatments, you can transform your smile and take years off your appearance”.

As we age, teeth begin to wear. Worn teeth can negatively affect fullness in the face; enhancing already sagging facial features and making them appear even more aged. With age, the surfaces of your teeth may shorten from chewing, which can make the face and facial profile appear collapsed. This makes it appear older.

Veneers or crowns can be the optimal choice for correcting worn and misshapen teeth. Porcelain veneers or crowns can lengthen and whiten your teeth. In cases where the patients’ lower and upper jaws have become too close together due to wear, the bite can be restored to bring back the length and to make the face much fuller and more proportioned.

For a younger looking smile, contact Dr. Ryne Johnson or visit, www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org and remember, “See a Specialist, the Difference will Make you Smile.”

New Beauty Magazine


ORAL CARE AND OSTEOPOROSIS – NEWTON, BROOKLINE, WESTON, WELLESLEY, BOSTON

1 November 2013

If you are currently being treated for osteoperosis, Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “it is critical that you maintain perfect and regular care of your teeth. If you are about to enter into treatment for osteoporosis, it is essential that you have a thorough evaluation of your dental health and have all the treatment done prior to receiving any osteoporosis IV or oral medication”.

Bone is constantly being broken down and then built up again. Osteoporosis medications interfere with the breaking down of bone, thus slowing down the bone-loss process. This can affect your teeth and jaw. Bisphosphonates have caused serious bone healing issues, so it is imperative that you inform your dentist if on any of these medications. If you have taken or are currently taking any medicine for osteoporosis and have dental treatment coming up, you may want to submit for a simple test to see if you can safely be treated.

Bisphosphonates include ibandronate (Boniva), alendronate (Fosamax), risedronate (Actonel) and zoledronic acid (Reclast). In addition to slowing bone loss, these osteoporosis medications can cause side effects, including:

Stomach upset. Bisphosphonate pills can cause abdominal pain and the risk of esophageal ulcers. These are less likely to occur if the medicine is taken properly. Injected forms of bisphosphonates don’t cause stomach upset.

Jawbone problems. Rarely, bisphosphonate therapy can lead to osteonecrosis of the jaw — a bone disease that causes pain, swelling or infection in the jaw. Invasive dental procedures, such as tooth extractions, increase this risk.

Thighbone fractures. Long-term bisphosphonate therapy has also been linked to a rare type of thigh fracture that sometimes develops in both legs at once. This injury, known as atypical femoral fracture, is similar to a stress fracture, causing pain that may start out mild but gradually worsen.

Oral health maintenance is critical in patients with osteoporosis. Bisphosphonate therapy or other medical treatment for these people should be discontinued only after consultation with your physician. Dental care for patients with osteoporosis and other health conditions is important in order to maintain your overall health.

Dentists can also help in the diagnosis of osteoporosis. Orally, early warning signs of osteoporosis may include more severe gum disease, bone loss around teeth, tooth loss, dentures becoming loose, or ill-fitting dentures. Based on the findings in the patient’s medical history, clinical exam, and x-rays, dentist can refer at risk candidates for further bone mineral density testing. Many new studies suggest that dentist have sufficient clinical and radiographic information that enables them to play a significant role in early diagnosis and screening of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women.

For more information visit, www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com and remember, “See a Specialist, the Difference will Make you Smile.”

Excerpts – Dentalcare.com


ORAL HEALTH SAFEGUARDS YOUR PHYSICAL HEALTH – NEWTON, WESTON, WELLESLEY

24 October 2013

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, Prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “It’s never too early to start safeguarding your physical health and appearance… One’s smile influences how people are perceived”. None of us can stop the clock, but there’s plenty you can do to keep yourself looking and feeling as good as possible. Invest some time and money in well-being routines now and your future self will thank you: you’ll save yourself the stress of potentially expensive and time-consuming treatments further down the line. This includes taking care of your teeth and gums.

When it comes to establishing how best to care for your personal health, choosing the right dentist and products is important. A recent study was done to find out how adults spend their money, when it comes to health and fitness.

The survey revealed that taking care of oral health is seen as a top priority for most people. Teeth are the number one concern for most people (35%) in terms of their general health and well-being. A third of respondents (33%) said they were most likely to spend their money on toothpaste, toothbrushes and mouthwash, to keep teeth healthy and their breath fresh, and to make sure their smile looks good. This survey makes for encouraging reading because, in terms of safeguarding your future health, oral hygiene is hugely important.

Gum problems can often lead to an unwanted session in the dentist’s chair, and can prove expensive to treat too. Reactive case is always more costly and stressful than a proactive approach. By taking care of your gums at any age, you’re helping to protect yourself against problems that can affect your looks and avoid big problems down the line.

Spend time now, save money later

It’s vital to look after your skin and body, too. Daily cleansing, toning and moisturizing will undoubtedly pay dividends, helping to keep skin smooth and hydrated. Regular facial massages can also make a difference, improving circulation, enhancing muscle tone and improving surface skin cell renewal. Caring your teeth and skin will keep you younger looking.

Dental treatment can be costly and gum problems can start at any age. Preventing the onset of gum problems is the best way to invest in your future oral health. Use a low abrasive, great-quality toothpaste twice a day and flossing each night in addition to periodic visits with you hygienist will reduce and help to prevent gum problems.

To schedule a consultation, contact Dr. Johnson at visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com. And remember, “See a Specialist…The Difference Will Make You Smile.”

Guardian


DID YOU KNOW THAT A DENTIST CAN IMPROVE YOUR SEX LIFE? YES, IT’S TRUE….

15 October 2013

ED affects an estimated 30 million American men; 15% of men age 70 and older report complete impotence. Women have sexual issues as well; in one study, 43% of women reported sexual dysfunction that impaired their quality of life. And a study in last month’s Journal of Sexual Medicine found that women with sleep apnea were more likely to have significant sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction can be embarrassing and demoralizing to many people. Therefore, physicians often see a hesitation in bringing this topic up.

There is a growing body of research that shows a strong correlation between sleep apnea and erectile dysfunction in men. There is even evidence that sleep apnea is linked to a higher prevalence of sexual dysfunction in women. One study found that men with RLS (restless legs syndrome) were 78% more likely to have ED. The common mechanism here might be that both disorders involve a malfunction of the neurotransmitter, dopamine.

Experimental research that used a sleep deprivation protocol to study the effects of sleep on the hormones and metabolism. Healthy young men found a decrease in testosterone when there were several nights of short sleep times (five hours or less) for a week or less. If sleep deprivation is chronic, as it often is in real life, then it may be that milder levels of sleep deprivation have a cumulative effect and could lead to adverse hormonal consequences such as decreased testosterone.

Testosterone is produced during the night; the levels climb steadily throughout the night and peak in the morning. There are studies showing not only that a decrease in the total amount of sleep can lower a man’s testosterone, but also that REM sleep is important to the production and release of testosterone. We know that REM sleep is often decreased or absent in patients with sleep apnea. Therefore, it seems that both the quantity and quality of sleep are important for testosterone production.

However, with sleep apnea, there is another reason that there could be erectile dysfunction: the low oxygen levels that are often associated with apnea, especially when it is severe. In some studies, the severity of the sleep apnea was the greatest predictor of ED while in others it was how low the oxygen went. We have known for years that chronically low oxygen levels at night adversely affects the vasculature of the heart, lungs, brain, and now we can add the penis.

So, how can your dentist help? According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Parters, “For many years, we’ve been fabricating appliances to help patients with snoring or sleep apnea. It’s a simple, two-visit procedure where hard, acrylic mouth guards are made that reposition the jaw in a forward and open position. Many people prefer these appliances to the CPAP machines. We’ve seen a lot of success”.

The good news is that often with treatment of the sleep disorder, the sexual dysfunction improves dramatically, thereby enhancing energy, mood and overall quality of life. For more information, visit www.NewtonWellelseyDentalPartners.com and remember to “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile.”

Some content provided by: Lisa Shives, M.D.


DENTAL IMPLANTS ARE A LIFETIME REPLACEMENT FOR MISSING TEETH – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, WESTON

11 October 2013

Dental implants represent a permanent solution for any missing teeth. Dental implants have revolutionized the field of dentistry, and they are still getting better.

Currently, most patients want to get dental implants done within a few hours, in one dental visit compared to years back when many months of time was the standard of care. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Using sophisticated CT Scans, CAD/CAM technology and computer software to diagnose and pre-design the case, the implants can be placed with such precision that they are simply punctured through the gumline, and often the dentistry can be fitted immediately. It really is the new standard of care”.

Dental implants represent the best solution for missing teeth, and they are the best investment in the long run. Many people with a lower budget think they cannot afford dental implants and opt for dentures instead. But, they forget that because the bone continues to ‘shrink, in 5 years dentures will need to be replaced, again. So instead of spending thousands twice for dentures, consider dental implants for a lifetime.

With dental implants, you only pay once for the bone grafting, the insertion of the titanium screw (s) and the placing of the dental work. Once your implants in place, you will have strong and healthy teeth for a lifetime.

With dental implants, the most important thing to consider is the jawbone. If your bone structure is healthy and dense enough, dental implants are easily performed. However, if your jaw bone is not healthy or strong enough, bone grafting is necessary. Only a solid and dense jaw bone can actually support dental implants.

For discriminating people, the dental implant treatment should be performed by dental surgeons, periodontists and prosthodontists. It is best to see the restoring dentist first to determine the desired final prosthetics. The procedure is invasive, so if you are thinking about getting dental implants it is extremely important to select a highly skilled and experienced dentist.

Even full mouth dental implant restorations are possible, and sometimes the dentist will suggest implant supported dentures to make things easier on the patient. Dr. Johnson, who many regard as Boston’s best prosthodontist, can help you decide if you are a good candidate for dental implants.

For more information, visit, www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com and remember to “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile.”

Excerpts – World Dental


TREATMENTS FOR ADULTS WITH MISSING TEETH – NEWTON, WESTON, BROOKLINE

3 October 2013

Your smile is everything, and if you are not comfortable with yours your self-confidence, and even your success, can suffer. In fact, many adults struggle with their smiles. The average adult between the ages of 20 and 64 has three or more decayed or missing teeth. If you are missing one or more teeth, there are plenty of reasons, from aesthetics to functionality, that you should correct the problem.

A large space between your teeth may affect how you speak or eat. Even if it’s not noticeable, a missing molar can affect how you chew and remaining teeth may shift. In some cases, bone loss can occur around a missing tooth. With today’s dental technology, you don’t have to suffer from missing teeth.

Here are some options to replace missing teeth. Talk to Dr. Johnson about which option is best for you:

  • Bridges. Anchored to your adjacent teeth, these can be removable or fixed, depending on your mouth, your dentist’s recommendation and your needs.
  • Dentures. An option if you’ve lost all or most of your teeth.
  • Implants. Most similar to a natural tooth.

If you are missing teeth there are a few treatment options. Getting a dental implant to replace your missing tooth is probably the treatment of choice. An implant has a root that integrates with your jaw bone and the crown on the implant makes it look, feel and function like your natural tooth. This is the most permanent and long-term solution.

The next best option would be to get a bridge. A bridge is like three crowns connected together. The two teeth adjacent to the missing tooth are cut for dental crowns. The bridge is then placed onto those two adjacent teeth. The bridge has a fake tooth that connects to two crowned teeth and fills in the empty space from the congenitally missing tooth.

Another option for replacing a congenitally missing tooth would be to get a removable partial denture. This is an appliance that you can put in and take out of your mouth. It rests on your natural teeth and your gums and has teeth on it that replace the congenitally missing teeth.

Dr. Johnson reminds you to visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com for more information and remember to, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile.”

Excerpts – Oralanswers


MEN: LOOKING FOR A BETTER JOB? START BY VISITING THE DENTIST!

26 September 2013

An online poll of general dentists and consumers confirms the traditional stereotype that middle-aged men are less likely to visit the dentist than their female or younger-male counterparts.

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, considered by many to be Boston’s Best Prosthodontist, “many men do not visit the dentist until there’s a problem or because they are afraid or embarrassed or because they don’t want to make the time”.

This long-standing trend and excuse, however, may be disappearing as more men are getting back into their dentist’s office…for a surprising reason.

“Many men are addressing issues related to cosmetics (bleaching, veneers, implants and crowns)”, says Dr. Johnson, “as the competition for high-end positions in corporate America heats up. No longer is a bad initial appearance overlooked in men. The reality today is that middle-aged men are competing for jobs against younger men and women making one’s appearance an important factor in the interview process.”

As our workplace becomes more mobile, first impressions play an ever-increasing role. One’s smile is important for success. Watch the video below or click here to view a commercial currently running in the Brookline-Newton-Wellesley-Weston zone, both on Verizon & Comcast.

Dr. Johnson reminds you to visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com for more information and remember to, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile.”


HEPATITIS C TRANSMISSION IN OKLAHOMA DENTAL OFFICE CONFIRMED

20 September 2013

As you may be aware, there is news coverage about one confirmed case of patient-to-patient hepatitis C transmission linked to improper infection control practices in an Oklahoma oral surgeon’s office. The transmission is described as “patient to patient” because improper infection control procedures caused the virus to be passed from one patient to another. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “it does matter who you see for your dental care and what happens ‘behind the scenes’ is often a reflection of the dentist’s commitment to cleanliness and attention to detail”.

Yesterday, the Oklahoma State Department of Health and Tulsa Health Department published an interim status report of findings related to their ongoing investigation of this oral surgeon’s infection control practices. The report included confirmation of the first documented patient-to-patient transmission of hepatitis C virus associated with a dental setting in the United States. These findings were also independently confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) through genetic-based testing of patient specimens.

The ADA has been monitoring this investigation closely since March and will continue its watch. As a result of yesterday’s reported findings and subsequent news coverage, the ADA has fielded some media inquiries about infection control in U.S. dental offices.

At Newton Wellesley Dental Partners your well-being is important to Dr. Johnson and his staff. Be assured that they follow stringent infection control procedures developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and comply with all federal & state regulations for the protection of patients. Your health and safety are their foremost priorities!

…. just a few of the things that are done at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners in terms of infection control:

  • All dental staff involved in patient care cleanse their hands before each and every patient, and use appropriate protective attire.
  • A new set of gloves are used for each patient.
  • Before you enter the examining room, all surfaces, such as the dental chair, instrument tray, dental light, drawer handles and countertops, have been cleaned and decontaminated.
  • All non-disposable dental instruments are cleaned and sterilized between patient appointments. All instruments and dental drills are sterilized.
  • Disposable items like needles are never used on more than one patient.

For more information, visit, www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com And remember to, “See a Specialist, the Difference will Make You Smile”.

ADA


COMPOSITE OR PORCELAIN VENEERS, WHICH IS BETTER? – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, WESTON

16 September 2013

Porcelain veneers are custom designed shells that are used to improve the appearance of stained, chipped or broken teeth. You have a choice between composite veneers or porcelain veneers, and according to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, the most popular choice being porcelain. Why? They offer a stronger and more durable alternative giving you a confident, healthy smile.

Porcelain veneers are less prone to staining and last longer than composite veneers. Porcelain veneers are thin sheets of porcelain, modeled by Dr. Johnson and his very talented ceramist, that are adhered to the teeth to change the appearance of teeth which are too short, textured, badly stained, or gapped. Porcelain gives your teeth a more natural looking, translucent appearance, similar to your natural teeth.

According to Dr. Johnson, who many have called Boston’s Best Prosthodontist, “Patients and dentists choose porcelain veneers because composite veneers do not last as long, needing to be replaced more often. Porcelain veneers are a better choice over bonding as well because they resist staining from food and drink and they also last longer”.

The veneer is applied after removing a bit of the enamel from your teeth leaving you with beautiful natural teeth and a confident, attractive smile. Dental veneers can solve most or even all of your cosmetic dental issues, regardless of the cause. Veneers are most often used to correct worn enamel, wear and tear, genetics, gaps, chips, and stains.

For unattractive teeth, dental veneers are a perfect, pain free solution. To create a bright white smile with beautifully straight teeth, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com And remember to…”See a Specialist, the Difference Will Make You Smile.”


DENTAL CROWN QUESTIONS ANSWERED BY DR. RYNE JOHNSON, PROSTHODONTIST AT NEWTON WELLESLEY DENTAL PARTNERS

4 September 2013

What is a dental crown?
A dental crown, or “cap,” is a tooth-shaped restoration that is made by a machine. It is designed to cover and strengthen the entire tooth.

Why might I need a dental crown?
Your dentist may recommend a dental crown for a tooth that has had a root canal, or one that has had a large filling, to help keep the tooth strong for biting and chewing. Crowns can also be used to hold a dental bridge in place or to cover a dental implant. A crown may also be recommended to protect a weak, broken, or discolored tooth.

What types of materials are used to make crowns?
Metal Alloy – gives a silver appearance. Metal crowns are very strong and therefore tend to last longer than other crown materials.

Porcelain (including Ceramic and Glass-Like materials) – the most natural looking and the color can be designed to closely match surrounding teeth. Because it is not as strong as metal, porcelain crowns may break or fracture due to heavy biting or grinding.

Porcelain Fused to Metal – Covering a metal crown with porcelain creates a more natural looking crown. The metal provides an additional level of strength to the crown, even though the porcelain may still be prone to fracture.

What is involved in?
Getting a dental crown typically takes two dental office visits. Newton Wellesley Dental Partners uses CAD/CAM technology to help create precise shapes and sizes for dental restoration including bridges and crowns. We use this technology to design the anatomical features, size, and shape of the tooth.

A 3D image of your mouth and gums allows us to draw the precise design of the tooth restoration giving you a perfect fit. This first step creates the “thimble” which sits over the tooth against the gum. Then an artisan layers the ceramic over the thimble in order to create the life-like look.

Will I need a root canal if I get a crown?
No, not all teeth that get crowns need to have a root canal. Typically, teeth that have had a root canal treated do need to have a crown placed on the tooth.

For more information on dental crowns, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com and remember to, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile”.

Met Life


PROLONGED THUMB-SUCKING CAN CAUSE A DENTAL OPEN BITE, BOSTON

22 August 2013

Think about it, a seemingly harmless act as a child can change the facial form of the child for life and result in various respiratory, dental, and speech problems. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, Prosthdontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “the child would develop and open bit e and would have difficulty with something as simple as biting into a sandwich or a pizza slice”

Many of us can picture this scenario: a crying child driving you and everyone around you to the brink of insanity. What finally gets the child to stop? Sucking happily on his or her thumb. But this temporary relief can have serious consequences.

Most children stop thumb sucking by 2 and 1/2 years of age, and thumb-sucking is even considered normal until age 3. However, when the finger habit persists beyond the toddler years and into the adolescent years, there can be significant effects on the teeth, gums, jaws, and even facial form.

Prolonged thumb-sucking turns into a habit that can cause a dental and even a skeletal open bite. If the habit ceases while the child is still growing, the dental open bite can self-correct, but sometimes the help of a dentist or an orthodontist is required to correct the position of the teeth and align the jaws. Oftentimes the actual thumb-sucking may stop, but the child develops a tongue-thrusting habit while eating, speaking, and swallowing. This tongue-thrusting then perpetuates the deleterious force on the dentition and jaws. If the open bite is not corrected while the child is growing, then jaw surgery may be required to correct the bite.

What can be done? As stated previously, until age 3 this finger habit is considered normal, but if it persists, we must discuss with the parents ways to stop it. Various over-the-counter treatments can be found at drugstores. Try to find out why the child has continued the habit; look for the etiology. If it continues, then we as a dental profession may need to intervene. There are various types of devices that can be used, from Bluegrass and tongue shield appliances to composite or metal spikes bonded to the lingual of the maxillary incisors. Even removable types of appliances can be used, but these are not as effective because children have a tendency to not wear them.

It is important to note that this is a collaborative effort by the dental professional, parent, and patient in order to break the habit and prevent some of the ill effects and eventual jaw surgery. For additional information, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com and remember to, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile”.

Articles and images – Dentistry IQ Network, August 2013


CHOOSE THE RIGHT BOSTON PROSTHODONTIST FOR A HOLLYWOOD SMILE

15 August 2013

Michael Graham, radio personality and host of the Michael Graham Show on Boston Herald Radio, celebrated the end of the summer movie season with Dr. Ryne Johnson, director and prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. Dr. Johnson was on the show to discuss Hollywood smiles and how those smiles get to look that glamorous and eye-catching.

Their topic was Hollywood smiles: “the good, the bad and the ugly”.

Dr. Johnson offered expert commentary on some of the crafted smiles in Hollywood: Oprah, George Clooney, Nicholas Cage, Madonna, Tom Cruise, and others. According to Dr. Johnson, “Nicholas Cage is one of the most spectacular before and after smiles”.

His mouth was a mess as an adolescent. He actually had two teeth removed, live and on camera without novacaine for the movie “Birdy”. He now has a fantastic, great looking smile. That was done with the help of a great dentist, which is why you need to see a quality dentist who has expertise in cosmetic and implant dentistry and who can perform a full-mouth reconstruction.

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners does this everyday.

Tom cruise, if you go back and look at Top Gun and his earlier movies, his smile was not always this perfect. His center teeth are off. This is very challenging work to have fixed. Dr. Johnson sees this regularly in his practice. Often people have congenital tooth issues. When people don’t fix this at an eary age, it becomes more problematic as teeth move around and shift in the mouth. Later in life, this is more challenging to fix. But, again, this is routine for Dr. Johnson.

Oprah is one of the most popular celebrities. She had her teeth moved orthodonticallly, through Invisalign. These are invisible, clear aligners that can often take the place of metal braces.

George Clooney used to have short teeth, most likely from teeth grinding. This can happen from anyone. Most likely his teeth have been fixed with veneers or crowns.

Leann Rhimes had her teeth worked on, but chose a dentist that was not too talented. Halfway through the procedures she ended up suing her dentist.

Then there are those actors who have chosen not to address the issues of their teeth because they feel it gives them “dysfunctional aesthetics”. Most everyday people in everyday life are not interested in this path!

Matt Damon has made a career out of his smile. But it is tough to tell if his smile is fake or not. But, Dr. Johnson believes that smile is all natural! For more information on cosmetic dentistry in Boston for a Hollywood smile, visit, www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org and remember, “See a Specialist, the Difference Will Make You Smile.”

If you’d like to listen to the podcast, click here.


SODA IS AS BAD FOR TEETH AS METHAMPHETAMINE

8 August 2013

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Excessive amounts of fizzy drinks can damage teeth as badly as methamphetamine (meth) or crack cocaine, as cited in a paper published in General Dentistry”.

In the study Dr Mohamed Bassiouny, professor of restorative dentistry at the Temple University School of Dentistry in Philadelphia, says that meth, crack cocaine and fizzy drinks, whether sweetened or not, are all highly acidic and can cause similar dental problems. Cola and other carbonated drinks cause harmful bacteria to grow in the mouth. Although good bacteria are needed to break down the proteins in the foods we eat, too many bacteria can cause problems. Dissolved carbon dioxide is what gives soda beverages that popular fizz. When the gas is dissolved in water, it forms carbonic acid. Since bacteria are anaerobic, they thrive in environments with little or no oxygen. Bacteria use sugar for energy, after which the sugar becomes plaque, enabling bacteria to stick to tooth enamel, causing cavities over time.

The study highlights that the teeth of individuals addicted to meth or crack cocaine can be misdiagnosed as dental caries rather than generalized dental erosion, a condition that is also associated with chronic excessive consumption of fizzy drinks.

So, limit your intake of sugary drinks and remember to brush and floss regularly to avoid costly dental procedures. For additional information, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com.

Gen Dent 2013- PubMed


DRUGS AND DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS AND YOUR DENTISTRY – NEWTON, WELLESLEY

31 July 2013

Because nearly 70% of prescription drug users do not discuss their dietary supplement use with their dentists, clinicians must be proactive in questioning patients about their use of these agents. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “A complete and accurate pharmacological history will help your dentist avoid potential interactions between dietary supplements and drugs”.

Believe it or not there are drug interactions between popular dietary supplements and medications used commonly in dentistry.

Provided that patients are not taking ginkgo, St. John’s wort, evening primrose or valerian, oral health care providers can prescribe or administer any of the medications used commonly in dentistry without concern about possible dietary supplement–drug interactions.

According to the evidence, acetaminophen is perhaps the best analgesic choice for patients who use or may use dietary supplements because it is not associated with any clinically significant dietary supplement–drug interactions, in contrast to other analgesics evaluated.

Amoxicillin, cephalexin, metronidazole and penicillin are considered the best antibiotic choices for users of dietary supplements.

Practical Implications. Recognition and avoidance of potential interactions between dietary supplements and drugs will help your dentist optimize treatment while emphasizing patients’ safety.

Always talk to your dentist or doctor about the medications or dietary supplements you are taking. For more information, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com and remember to, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile”.

JADA


CELEBRITIES AND COSMETIC DENTISTRY

25 July 2013

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, regarded as one of Boston’s Best Prosthodontists, “Cosmetic dentistry procedures have increased dramatically since I began my practice some 25 years ago, especially for people ‘in front of the camera. The advent of High Definition TV has even placed a cosmetic burden on local personalities and I have seen many within the past few years”. With the increasing popularity of celebrity lifestyles, this trend has increased as we hear more about celebrities and their cosmetic dentistry procedures.

Here is a look at some types of cosmetic dentistry procedures well known celebrities have undergone.

George Clooney– The most wanted Hollywood bachelor, has undergone quite a complex smile makeover procedure involving at least three different types of dental treatments such as porcelain veneers, dental crowns and lengthening of the crowns. It is possible that George Clooney struggles with a condition known as bruxism (grinding of the teeth).

Bruxism wears down tooth enamel, and it makes the teeth look unhealthy, non-symmetrical and dull. For George Clooney, the number one solution to cover up the worn teeth was represented by the dental veneers, but the actor also had a crowns lengthening procedure.

With crown lengthening, the gumline is reshaped to make the teeth appear longer. According to estimates, the smile makeover like the one performed on George Clooney costs between $30,000 and $40,000.

Katherine Heigl – She has admitted to using the Invisalign dental braces in order to straighten her two lateral incisor teeth which were slightly protruding outwards.

Wearing metal dental braces was not an option for an actress, so she chose invisible dental braces, Invisalign. These types of braces are perfect for slightly crooked or misaligned teeth, and no one will actually notice that braces are present.

Miley Cyrus– When she was a child her gummy smile looked cute. However, she realized that in order to get a more delicate and feminine look, her smile needs a makeover.

The main cosmetic dental procedures she went through include dental veneers and a special surgery in order to fix the “gummy smile” and expose more of the natural tooth.

Madonna – Madonna’ trademark when it comes to her smile is definitely the gap between her two front teeth. If one starts comparing pictures of her in the 90s, and more recent pictures it can be easily noticed that the gap disappeared…for the moment at least.

Experts in the field say she fixed her dental gap with cosmetic bonding a few years ago, and then quite recently she has “undone” the procedure and the gap is back. Eventually, she might have realized that the dental gap is a tiny part of what makes her so unique and famous…But not all have gone well. LeAnn Rimes sued her dentist over gum inflammation claiming negligence of her dentist. She says her dentist placed 8 faulty crowns that are affecting her singing as well as her daily life. She has recently undergone treatments to remove the crowns.

Other notable celebs that made substantial improvements to their appearance include: Tom Cruise, David and Victoria Beckham, Lindsay Lohan, Cristiano Ronaldo, Zac Efron and David Bowie.

In short, the list is too extensive to fully outline here but a simple Google search of “celebrity dentistry” will produce countless results. Dr. Johnson, suggests that, “You don’t need to be a celebrity to undergo an extreme makeover… a smile can make or break one’s career”. Countless, local celebrities and VIPs can attest that the skill and reputation of one’s prosthodontist can determine whether a smile looks like dentistry or looks like natural, radiant beauty.

For outstanding treatment, remember to, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile”!

visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com for more information

Excerpts – World Dental
Image from The Sun – http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/features/4873081/dodgy-celeb-teeth/l


INCREASE DENTAL HEALTH AND LOWER RISK OF OTHER HEALTH PROBLEMS

19 July 2013

Did you know that 90% of systemic conditions are related to the overall condition of the mouth? According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “There is an enormous link between oral health and the overall health and wellbeing of a patient. Many people often forget that their mouth is a gateway to the entire body and when the mouth becomes infected so do you”.

Symptoms such as bleeding gums, rapid tooth decay and inflammation could be early warning signs of diabetes and heart disease. Because of this relatively new link discovery, Dr. Johnson recommends regular dental checkups, and where dental issues persist, he recommends fixing those issues.

Crooked or missing teeth can lead to dental problems, which could lead to other health issues. Crooked teeth are harder for patients to clean on their own. Missing and crooked teeth can also throw off the alignment of your jaw, causing bone, jaw and muscles issues that can result in head, neck and back aches.

CAD/CAM, CT Scans and digital dentistry allows Dr. Johnson insight into your mouth, teeth and jaw. If you have tooth or mouth issues, Newton Wellesley Dental Partners can do a risk assessment to develop a treatment plan that you are comfortable with. The doctors will also take the time to be sure you are fully informed and educated on the problem and the solution. Dr. Johnson firmly believes that an educated patient is a happy and comfortable patient…one who receives the best dentistry can offer.

By lowering the risk of dental disease in patients one’s risk of other serious health disease will be lowered too. The team at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners is determined to ensure that their patients achieve ultimate health.

For information or to schedule a consultation, contact us at www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org and “See a Specialist…The Difference Will Make You Smile”.


CHOOSE A PROSTHODONTIST FOR YOUR COSMETIC DENTISTRY – WELLESLEY, MA

9 July 2013

Thinking about veneers – or invisible braces? Learn the horrifying truth about cosmetic dentists and you may think again:

  • There’s been a significant rise in people seeking cosmetic dentistry
  • There’s also been a surge in number of cases of negligence
  • Under-qualified practitioners are trying to cash in

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “When you are seeking a cosmetic dental procedure, do your homework. Be sure your dentist is qualified”. Dr. Johnson recommends you consider seeing a prosthodontist.

Prosthodontists have 3 more years of training and expertise than a general dentist. And anyone can call themselves a cosmetic dentist without any additional expertise or training.

In the past five years there has been a significant increase in the number of people seeking cosmetic dentistry – and a similar surge in the number of cases of negligence as under-qualified practitioners cash in.

In fact, a dental negligence law firm said they have seen a 20% rise in cases in the last year, “We are seeing a huge rise in cases involving cosmetic dentistry. So many people want to emulate that Hollywood smile that dentists now see cosmetic dentistry as a lucrative sideline. There are an increasing number of exclusively cosmetic dentistry practices, who market their procedures with glossy ads. There are no controls – any qualified dentist can set themselves up as a cosmetic dentist without further specialist training”.

Dr. Johnson wants you to be an educated patient. He will educate you on the options, materials and procedures that are right for you, and he encourages you to get several opinions. But most of all, he is interested in having you find the best and most qualified dentist to meet your needs and for you to be satisfied with your beautiful, new, pain-free smile.

For more information on cosmetic dentistry or the difference a prosthodontist can make, visit, www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com And remember, “See a Specialist, the Difference Will Make You Smile.”

Excerpts – DailyMail


GUM GRAFTS FIX RECEDING GUMS – WESTON, NEWTON, WELLESLEY

27 June 2013

Do you have receding gums or do your gums feel extra sensitive? According to Dr. Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “Receding gums are a sign of two things: gum disease or overly aggressive brushing.” Left untreated, gum disease can lead to tooth loss and possibly heart disease. Early stages of gum disease can be treated with a non-surgical scaling and root planing treatment. However, excessively receding gums sometimes requires a surgical treatment called a gum graft.

When receding gums start, lighter brushing will be effective if there is still enough gum tissue left that can act as a barrier from disease and bone loss. But if your gums have receded to the extent that your tooth roots are exposed, you may need a gum graft. Exposed tooth roots can cause sensitive teeth or make your teeth appear longer. Most importantly, exposed tooth roots can leave your teeth vulnerable to bacteria and periodontal disease.

Also, a malpositioned frenum can lead to recession. The frenum is the muscle fiber often seen inserting between teeth. If it pulls on the gum, this could result in gum recession. This is called high frenum attachment. Gum grafts can also be used to fix this as well. Additionally, orthodontics can also stretch the gum line and cause the gums to recede. In all cases, gum grafts are an excellent way to protect the underlying bone and prevent the gums from receding further.

For more information, visit Dr. Johnson at www.NewtonWellesleyDental Partners.com and remember to, “See a Specialist…The Difference Will Make You Smile”.


THIS YEAR POST-SEASON HOCKEY RESULTS IN MISSING TEETH – NEWTON, WELLESLEY, MA

18 June 2013

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist with Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “The road to the Stanley Cup is fraught with peril, and much of that peril happens in and around the mouth”. It’s never all that surprising when a player takes a puck, glove or stick to the mouth and loses a few teeth in the process — but this postseason has been off the charts. No matter the cause, pucks, elbows or sticks, teeth are regularly knocked out in hockey. Of course they are, many players don’t wear a face mask and those who do are only protected over their eyes. The teeth are still targets for stray equipment or body parts. In fact, this post season alone, with 1/2 of the Stanley Cup Final series to go, we’ve seen 15 lost teeth! That is just in the post season.

Losing almost all of your teeth in a single incident can be a devastating experience. During Game 4 of the West Conference Finals, Chicago Blackhawks defenseman Duncan Keith lost seven teeth when a hockey puck hit his mouth during a play.

But players’ attitudes toward their teeth are evolving, as is hockey dentistry. An increasing number of NHL players are wearing custom-made mouth guards, which, dentists say, reduce injuries. And those who have broken teeth are having them fixed sooner and with better techniques and materials. Dr. Johnson appeared on Michael Graham’s Boston-based radio show to discuss this topic. His expert testimony enlightened listeners, as this prosthodontist is known as the ‘go-to-guy’ for advanced, trauma-related reconstructive dental care. To listen to the ten-minute segment click here.

Dental Implants
Dental implants are used to replace the roots of missing teeth. The implants are placed within the jawbone to feel like natural roots, and they hold crowns, bridges and dentures in place to improve the appearance of your smile. 3D imaging is used for accurate examinations of the patient’s mouth. With this advanced technology, we can assess whether you are a good candidate for dental implants and create a dental plan that works best for your mouth.

Crowns
A crown is designed to match the appearance and shades of your natural teeth, and is often placed over the dental implant to improve your smile. CAD/CAM technology is used to transform a digital image of your tooth into a 3D virtual model, which is then used to create a ceramic restoration of your tooth in less than an hour. You can receive a crown and improve your smile in one simple appointment.

For more information on missing teeth and their solutions, contact NewtonWelleselyDentalPartners.com.


HOW TO COMBAT TOOTH DECAY – NEWTON, WELLESLEY

14 June 2013

Tooth Decay affects millions of people. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “The moment the first baby teeth appear, one is susceptible to factors that can cause rotting teeth”. The primary causes of Tooth Decay are complex and pervasive. But we know one thing: left untreated, a rotting tooth is destined to become a dead tooth and lead to infection and tooth/bone loss.

Tooth Decay is the result of the demineralization of tooth enamel. This chemical process is why cavities and rotting teeth appear discolored and translucent. The “best-case” scenario is that the acid responsible for rotting teeth will create a small dental cavity. The worst-case scenarios is that the acid will eat through the enamel and dentin into the pulp of the tooth producing first a toothache and then a dead tooth.

The consumption of sugar and starchy foods causes the growth of the acid-producing bacteria that is responsible for rotting teeth. In part, this explains why so many children experience decayed or rotten teeth. In fact, 6 out of 10 children in the U.S. will have a least one cavity filled by age 5. One of the reasons for this is inconsistent oral hygiene and/or lack of fluoride.

Preventing rotten teeth takes a common sense and dedication. The key to avoiding rotting teeth is reducing the amount of cavity-causing bacteria and dental plaque in your mouth. This requires a real commitment to good oral hygiene, including:

  • Brushing your teeth 2-3 times a day
  • Using tartar-control toothpaste with fluoride
  • Flossing daily
  • Rinsing with a fluoride mouthwash
  • Cutting back on starchy and sugary foods
  • Increasing saliva flow by chewing xylitol gum
  • Regular professional dental cleanings

For more information, to read other blogs or to make an appointment, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org


HABITS THAT CAUSE TMJ/TMD – NEWTON, MA

6 June 2013

TMD or TMJ disorder (temporomandibular joint disorder) is a painful condition that affects many people. There is no known cure and, but there are treatments available to address the symptoms or reduce the chances of the condition worsening. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “While many people have jaw pain and believe it to be TMJ/TMD, this condition should not be self-diagnosed. You could have other jaw issues, so see a dental specialist”.

TMD/TMJ disorder develops because the jaw joint structures have been eroded away or because there is too much stress being placed there. Several habits can increase the stress applied to TMJ. Other than injury or accidents, here are the most common factors that can affect jaw joint health.

1) Clenching your teeth: Notice if you clench your teeth when you’re angry, happy, playful, working out or concentrating. If you’re clenching your teeth, they can feel sore after chewing or at the end of the day or the muscles associated with chewing can be ‘tired’.

2) Grinding your teeth: Many people engage in grinding while they sleep. It’s usually a reaction to stress or a malocclusion. You may experience stiff and sore jaw muscles when you wake up. Your dentist or hygienist may also discover that the surfaces of your teeth are being worn down, this is a clinical sign of grinding and/or clenching.

3) Biting your lip: Believe it or not, habitually biting or nibbling your lips can also produce undue strain in your jaw joint. Physiologically, your jaw joint is not designed to optimally handle the stress that occurs when your teeth bite down in that position. This will strain the jaw joint muscles, and tendons supporting the jaw structures.

4) Chewing gum: Habitual gum chewing can also be detrimental to your jaw joint health. The jaw joint isn’t made to withstand constant sticky chewing for long periods and this will cause it to tire. Some patients have been known to developing clicking in their jaw joint as a result of gum chewing.

These habits cause the jaws and teeth to function incorrectly. If left untreated these issues are likely to lead to significant problems later in life. If you have any questions or concerns about your joint health, visit Dr. Johnson at www.NewtonWelleselyDentalPartners.com, and remember, “See a Specialist…The Difference Will Make You Smile.”

Empowher


A NATURAL WHITE SMILE FOR YOUR WEDDING DAY PHOTOS – BOSTON

23 May 2013

Wedding season, graduations, engagement parties those summer days on the beach…June is right around the corner. You want your memorable photos to be perfect. In-office teeth whitening can make your special occasion photos memorable for all the right reasons.

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, Prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “most over-the-counter teeth whitening products really don’t whiten like they promise”. In fact, regardless of the price, you could be very disappointed. Even the more expensive over-the-counter brands that you can buy at the store really don’t work any better than the ones you’ll pay 99 cents for. Much like the difference between over-the-counter pain medication and prescription narcotics, there is a difference. Teeth are porous. Over-the-counter whitening products may lighten the front of your teeth; but you need to address the entire tooth. In-office teeth whitening takes care of this. Dr. Johnson and his team will create custom fitted whitening trays (needed for periodic touch-ups) that fit your teeth specifically. As a result the front, back, and sides of your teeth are whitened which affects how the light reflects and refracts off the teeth. Over-the-counter whitening products are not ideally designed for your teeth.

Also, not all teeth will respond to whitening techniques…you could be wasting your money! Some grey stains (intrinsic ones like Tetracycline staining) or teeth with dentistry in place (crowns, veneers, and bonding) will not be affected by the bleaching materials.

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners will brighten your teeth to the right color for your coloring giving you a more natural looking, bright smile. No one should notice that your teeth are whiter. Instead, we want your friends and family to ask “have you cut your hair” or “have you lost weight”. The objective of teeth whitening should be a brighter, natural looking, youthful smile. Perfect for your wedding or special occasion photos.

If you really want to have whiter teeth, your best option is to see Dr. Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. He will make sure that teeth whitening is the best option for you. Once again, some dental work does not respond to teeth whitening. Before whitening your teeth, you need to be sure that you are a candidate and will have a gorgeous, predictable outcome.

For more information or for a consultation, visit, www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com and remember, “See a Specialist…The Difference Will Make You Smile.”


PICKING A PROSTHODONTIST FOR DENTAL IMPLANTS – BOSTON

17 May 2013

Maybe you have been advised to get dental implants or have teeth/dentistry that is failing. Advice from Dr. Ryne Johnson, Director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners and according to Boston Magazine, one of Boston’s most trusted and respected dentists…“do your homework and choose a prosthodontist”.

Unlike a general dentist, a prosthodontist has significant additional training and expertise in smile reconstruction. Prosthodontists understand how dental implants will impact your smile, they know how to balance your bite and aesthetics, and will ensure that your normal speech pattern is not affected once the dental implant(s) has been placed. A prosthodontist will use the most-current diagnostic tools to treatment plan your case.

Recent advancements in computer software and CT technology have created a revolution in dental implants where computer analysis, design and fabrication symbiotically allow for placement of ‘teeth’ the same day implants are placed. Dr. Johnson, who has been involved in computer-assisted implant placement since the 1980s has been regarded as a pioneer in this approach.

Prosthodontists can also customize your dental implants to fit your individual needs. The result will be the most attractive, natural looking and appropriate mouth restoration for you. Dr. Johnson, at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, firmly believes that an educated patient is a happy patient and one who gets the best value for their investment.

Tips for Choosing a Prosthodontist

  • Evaluate experience and credentials. A Google search is a simple way to garner information (good & bad) and if a prosthodontist is not easily found via a simple search, one should question experience and reputation. Perform a Google search using simple terms like, “Best Prosthodontist Boston”, Implant Reconstructions, and “Computer guided implant dentisty” to access a broad spectrum of results.
  • For the best results, choose a prosthodontist whose office uses 3D imaging (CAD/CAM).
  • As a specialized dental field, prosthodontics is always advancing. Talk to your prosthodontist about the most cutting-edge treatments and how they can be used to give you the best smile possible.
  • Choose a prosthodontist who compassionately and carefully listens to your needs and discusses SEVERAL options.

When considering dental implants, do your research and choose the treatment plan and prosthodontist that you are most comfortable with. Your smile is worth it. Visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org and remember to, “See a Specialist…The Difference Will Make You Smile.”


WANT A GREAT DEGREE? DENTAL ASSISTING

9 May 2013

YahooEducation offers information on great degrees for those who want a great job, but don’t like school. Degree #4: Associate’s in Dental Assisting.

Want to help people maintain healthy smiles but not sure you want to follow the long educational path toward dentistry? Earning a degree in dental assisting might be a good alternative.

Dental assisting is typically a one-year certificate or two-year associate’s program that you can build on,” says Kosin. While completion times will vary from student to student, this program is also ideal for people who loathe the lecture hall because it can often be hands-on. Kosin says that internships offered by some programs can give students a rich experience of working in a dental office before graduating.

What You Might Study: As a dental assisting student, the College Board notes that you could learn how to sterilize equipment and take x-rays and impressions in a dental assisting techniques class. You might also take an oral anatomy course and supplement your clinical coursework with classes like dental office management.

Click to Find the Right Dental Assisting Program.

Possible Career: If you’re interested in pursuing a career as a dental assistant, some states might require you to pass a state exam and graduate from an accredited program, which could lead to an associate’s degree, notes the U.S. Department of Labor. If you land a job in the field, you could be tackling a variety of tasks – from recording dental treatments and taking payments to processing x-rays and handing dentists tools during dental procedures.

As seen on http://education.yahoo.net/articles/degrees_for_school-haters/?kid=1O0JW


TEETH WHITENING IS NOT FOR EVERYONE

8 May 2013

With TV and magazines regularly forcing us to look at bright, beautiful and white smiles, we have become a society obsessed with white teeth. As a result, teeth whitening has become the most popular cosmetic procedure and teeth whitening products have taken over the HBA isles in grocery stores across America. However, according to Dr. Ryne Johnson of Newton Wellesley, Dental Partners, “teeth whitening is not for everyone or every mouth”.

If you are considering teeth whitening a visit to the dentist’s office is an important first step. Why? Over the counter teeth whitening kits are not made for everyone. They can aggravate existing dental conditions, and in some cases, they can cause dental conditions that did not exist before.

Over-the-counter whitening trays are made for the general population, which means that they are not custom fitted for your mouth. This allows the chemicals in the whitener to get on your gums and do damage. Whitening chemicals can also get inside an unknown cavity. This can cause damage to the tooth’s root often resulting in the need for root canals.

But another reason that an office visit is important prior to teeth whitening is because not all teeth respond. Perhaps you have one dark tooth surrounded by lighter teeth; after teeth whitening, you may find that you have only made the surrounding teeth lighter, drawing more attention to the dark tooth.

Teeth whitening does not work on teeth with root damage, false teeth or caps. In many cases, dental veneers are the only option to achieving the bright white smile you are looking for.

Darker teeth are often caused from trauma. If the tooth injury is severe, the nerve can die and often these teeth often turn dark in color. These stains do not respond as readily to over the counter teeth whitening.

In-office teeth whitening is designed to bleach the entire tooth, inside, out and around making a whiter, brighter tooth. If brighter teeth cannot be achieved through in-office whitening, dental veneers or crowns may be the right option. Dental veneers are thin porcelain veneers that are adhered to the front of your natural teeth and crowns envelope the entire tooth.

To find out if teeth whitening is right for you, check out Dr. Johnson at NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com. Remember, “See a Specialist…The Difference will Make You Smile.”


QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR COSMETIC DENTIST

26 April 2013

You may be looking for the perfect cosmetic dentist who will create a beautiful smile for you. But according to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “you need to ask a lot of questions before you can be sure which office is the best fit and will deliver outstanding results”.

Cosmetic dentistry is dental work that will aesthetically enhance your teeth. While most people see a cosmetic dentist for aesthetics, a good cosmetic dentist will also focus on the functionality part and deliver work that looks like teeth…not like dentistry.

Combining aesthetics with perfect functionality is the most important thing when it comes to getting those dental veneers or implants.

You enlist a cosmetic dentist for: dental crowns, dental veneers, implants, gum grafts, enameloplasty, teeth whitening, full mouth reconstruction, or anything related to orthodontics.

What do you need to know about the cosmetic dentist you choose:

Experience. Ask your cosmetic dentist how long has he been practicing and how many procedures, like your, they’ve done in the past year. There are many general dentists who will offer a few cosmetic dentistry procedures, but it is import to know if they have the experience.

Is your cosmetic dentist board certified and licensed. The ADA (American Dental Association) offers the board certification, while licensing is offered by the state. If he is a licensed professional, it means that he has passed regularly all state and national examinations.

What are the main types of cosmetic dentistry procedures your dentist is qualified to offer? In order to be able to perform dental implant treatments, veneers and teeth whitening, seek a dentist who has completed two extra years of training. This demonstrates someone who is both passionate and focused on the type of dentistry you seek.

For your particular situation, ask the dentist what treatment he would recommend and why. Also, ask about the pros and cons of each dental treatment in your case.

What are the possible risks and complications with the type of cosmetic dentistry you have chosen?

Ask for examples of past work. A good cosmetic dentist can show you before and after pictures and probably more importantly, have current patients offer testimonials.

Dr. Ryne Johnson, a prosthodontist of 24 years, is one of Bostons most-trusted and respected cosmetically-focused practitioners. He is a licensed and board-eligible prosthodontist, trained in all areas of cosmetic dentistry. A certificate in prosthodontics requires 2 or 3 years of additional training. For more information or to make an appointment, contact Dr. Johnson at NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com. And remember, “See a Specialist…The Difference will Make You Smile.”

World Dental


WHY YOU NEED A GOOD DENTIST IN BOSTON – 7,000 DENTAL PATIENTS WARNED OF POTENTIAL HIV, HEPATITIS

18 April 2013

Some 7,000 patients of a Tulsa, Okla. dental practice were being notified they could have been exposed to HIV and hepatitis over the past six years.

Dentist W. Scott Harrington voluntarily stopped practicing when the investigation began. “The dentist is cooperating with investigators through his attorney”.

According to the State Board of Dentistry, the investigation into Harrington’s practice found “numerous violations of health and safety laws and major violations of the State Dental Act,” the health department said.

While the statement did not elaborate, the department said investigators with the state dental board “have been assisted by agents from the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics and the United States Drug Enforcement Administration concerning the maintenance, control and use of drugs on the premises.”

The investigation, it said, is “multifaceted and ongoing.” Patients who have seen Harrington since 2007 will be notified by letter. It is recommended they be tested for hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV, the health department said.

Hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV are serious medical conditions, and infected patients may not have outward symptoms of the disease for many years.

“As a precaution, and in order to take appropriate steps to protect their health, it is important for these patients to get tested. It should be noted that transmission in this type of occupational setting is rare.”

Patient information is available only from the past seven years, the department said. Those who saw Harrington before 2007 may not receive a letter.

For the above reasons, it is important you take care and time in choosing your dental practice. Ask for recommendations, look for dentist testimonials and reviews, and even ask for references if you need. Do your research and choose a dentist that you can trust.

For more information on Newton Wellesley Dental Patners and Dr. Johnson, contact us. Remember, “See a Specialist…The Difference will Make You Smile”.

WCVB.com


ARE MERCURY FIILLINGS MAKING YOU SICK?

10 April 2013

By Steven Salzberg, Forbes.com Contributor

Mehmet Oz hosts a popular TV show that reaches millions of people. He offers a constant stream of medical advice, and he is popular because he makes his topics sound dramatic, or exciting, or surprising, or all three.

Unfortunately, Dr. Oz sometimes demonstrates a poor understanding of science. At least I hope so, because he promotes so many outrageous treatments, with such enthusiasm, that the only other explanation I can think of is that he is simply a fraud. I don’t think that’s true, so let’s give him the benefit of the doubt and assume that when he makes a mistake, he is simply ignorant of the truth. His latest startling revelation is that the metal fillings in your teeth are very, very bad for you. Or are they?

Last week, Dr. Oz hosted a show called “Toxic Teeth: Are Mercury Fillings Making you Sick?” The show looked at silver amalgam fillings, which contain a small amount of mercury chemically bound within them. Mercury is indeed a toxin. Should you worry?

One problem with taking a skeptical look at a Dr. Oz’s show is that he packs each episode with scientific claims, coming at you thick and fast, and it would take hours to critique them all. Instead, I’ll just pick a few, which illustrate Oz’s lack of concern for accuracy, and his apparent ignorance of the underlying science about dental fillings.

Dr. Oz opens his show with a dramatic claim about mercury:

“This thermometer contains mercury,” he says, holding up a very small thermometer. “If I were to drop it, we would have to evacuate this entire studio immediately!”

Now, this is complete nonsense. If you drop a mercury thermometer, you should carefully clean up the mercury, which beads up into nice little silver-colored balls. No one in the room is in danger, unless perhaps they try to inhale it.*

This opening salvo should set off anyone’s skeptical alarm bells. Here’s a guy who doesn’t seem to mind exaggerating to make a point. Why trust anything he says in the rest of the show? I suspect, though, that after watching this episode, thousands of Oz’s loyal viewers raced to the phone and made appointments to have the silver fillings in their teeth removed.

Dr. Oz continues his introduction by explaining that mercury is contained in silver tooth fillings. No one knew, he claims, that mercury vapor could be released from these fillings, but this news:

“sparked a firestorm 30 years ago [here the show cuts to a graphic of a fireball exploding] when major news reports brought to light the potential TOXICITY of mercury fillings. … Now there’s mounting new evidence showing mercury is released when you eat, and even when you brush your teeth.”

Quick, run to the dentist! Get this toxic mess out of my mouth!

But hang on a minute. Why aren’t people dropping like flies from the fillings in their teeth? With little effort, I determined that, contrary to Dr. Oz’s statements, nothing new has been discovered lately about silver tooth fillings. I found studies going back to the 1970s that shown that we’ve long known for decades that mercury is released from these fillings. But Oz ignores all these. He even announces, a few minutes into the show, that

“for the first time ever, I’m going to show you what happens when you brush your teeth with mercury fillings.”

No, this is not the “first time ever.” As a scientist, I find it worrisome that Oz seems quite comfortable claiming, incorrectly, that he’s the first person ever to tell the world about this.

Perhaps the most outrageous – and unintentionally funny – segment of the show is the “demonstration,” where Oz introduces an Oz-certified expert on mercury vapor, David Wentz, who has a gizmo that looks like it was built by a sideshow huckster. The device is a plexiglass box that looks like it was meant to handle biohazards, with black rubber gloves that let you manipulate its contents. In the box: a set of fake teeth containing… silver fillings! And a toothbrush!

As he walks over to the device, Oz says “I work with Dave Wentz and his Ph.D. dad.” This goes by really fast, so you would be excused for not realizing that Dave Wentz himself doesn’t have a Ph.D., and for not knowing whether he has any credentials at all. Dr. Oz conveniently omits the fact that Wentz and his father run a highly profitable nutritional supplements company, USANA, which happens also to donate money to Oz’s nonprofit corporation, HealthCorps. Hmm.

Dr. Oz then reaches into the box, and while the audience watches in hushed excitement, he brushes the teeth, right on top of those silver fillings! Right on cue, Wentz proclaims that the mercury vapor reading hits 61 in just a few seconds.

“Anything over zero is toxic,” Wentz proclaims. “And we’re at 61.”
“Oh my goodness, 61!” Dr. Oz exclaims.
“That mercury is coming off the fillings, into your mouth, going across the blood-brain barrier, into your brain,” says Wentz dramatically.

Wow. I’ve been brushing my teeth (which have several fillings) for years. How can I not be dead?

As Dr. Oz should know, “the dose makes the poison.” Even water can kill you if you drink too much of it. Wentz is clearly wrong to say that “anything over zero is toxic.”

How much mercury is safe, then?

According to the EPA, 0.1 micrograms of mercury per kilogram of body weight per day is safe. For an adult who weighs around 150 pounds, that’s about 7 micrograms. A 6-ounce can of tuna has about 20 micrograms of mercury, about 3 times the safe amount per day. Scientists do have real concerns that mercury in tuna and other fatty fish might present a health hazard.

Dr. Oz’s device seemed to show that 61 micrograms of mercury were released from brushing teeth, which would be about 9 times the exposure that is considered safe. Is there really a risk here?

Well, no. The EPA has found that “nearly all methylmercury exposures in the U.S. occur through eating fish and shellfish.” (Admittedly, though, this is not mercury vapor.) The precise question that Oz claims to be explaining “for the first time” has been examined in multiple studies, and the evidence is that silver fillings are harmless. (See the FDA summary here.)

A thorough scientific review in 2004 concluded that:

The current data are insufficient to support an association between mercury release from dental amalgam and the various complaints that have been attributed to this restoration material. … Individuals with dental amalgam-attributed complaints had neither elevated HgU nor increased prevalence of hypersensitivity to dental amalgam or mercury when compared with controls. The findings of these studies suggested that individuals with complaints self-attributed to dental amalgam should be screened for underlying dental, physical, and psychiatric conditions.”

So no, there’s no evidence that mercury from silver fillings causes any health problems. None.

But what about that device on Dr. Oz’s show, which showed 61 micrograms being released in just a few seconds of brushing the teeth? My conclusion is that the device in Dr. Oz’s studio was either wildly inaccurate or simply fraudulent. The setup was almost a parody of what real scientific instruments look like, and nothing about it gave me any confidence that it was reliable. I would suggest to Oz that before making a claim like this, he should ask rigorously trained scientists to make the measurements using properly calibrated equipment. A TV studio is no substitute for a real lab.

But wait: Mehmet Oz is a Professor of Surgery at Columbia University – he must know his science! Plus he has an M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, and he did his undergrad studies at Harvard. By all appearances, he is a very smart guy. If his show were about heart surgery – his specialty – it would no doubt be professional, accurate, and probably far too technical to attract an audience.

Here’s the rub: despite his credentials, Oz is not an expert on mercury amalgam fillings. He probably could have read and understood the science, but he appears to be unaware, or too busy to be bothered by, the many scientific studies on this subject. Had he done his homework, he might not have presented such a spectacularly overblown episode that seems intended to scare people into removing the silver fillings from their teeth.

So there’s no need to go out and get your silver fillings replaced. It’s too bad that a highly educated surgeon like Mehmet Oz, with such a big audience, prefers to present wild exaggerations rather than telling people the truth. Perhaps, though, the truth just isn’t that exciting.

*Note added on followup: Even swallowing is rarely harmful. From J. Dodes: “Acute toxic exposures to elemental mercury are rare but there have been cases of elemental mercury being accidentally released directly into the bloodstream from broken rectal thermometers and when elemental mercury had been swallowed intentionally in an attempt at suicide. In all these cases there was no long-term effects from the mercury.” Dodes, JE. The Amalgam Controversy:an evidence-based analysis. JADA, 132:348-56, 2001.

Forbes


NEWTON WELLESLEY DENTAL PARTNERS – DENTAL OFFICE TO THE BOSTON BREAKERS

2 April 2013

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners is pleased to be recognized as the official dental partner to the Boston Breakers.

Boston is one of the biggest sports cities in the world, steeped in historic performances and championship trophies. The Boston Breakers find themselves right in the mix. The longest-running professional women’s soccer team in U.S. history, the Breakers have roots dating back more than a decade. They have been one of the few franchises in Women’s soccer to be profitable and have the long standing support of the greater-Boston community.

The Breakers pride themselves on the work they do both on and off the field. When they’re not competing for a championship, they’re out in the community, making appearances at hospitals, youth camps, clinics, and more. Many of the women work in the business community and hold top-corporate positions.

As a result, the Breakers need to have beautiful smiles and they trust Dr. Ryne Johnson, a recognized and respected prosthodontist at NewtonWellesley Dental Partners. Dr. Johnson has the extra training and clinical expertise for every type of smile as well as aesthetic smile makeovers.

If you seek excellence like the Boston Breakers and would like more information, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com and Remember, “See a Specialist…The Difference will Make you Smile”.


HEAD AND NECK PAIN MAY BE CAUSED BY TMJ PROBLEMS

22 March 2013

Thousands of people suffer from chronic pain caused by problematic temporomandibular joints (TMJ). This condition is referred most commonly referred to as TMD which stands for temporomandibular joint disorder. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “TMD may be a result of the joint in your jaw, but it can affect different parts of the body causing neck, ear, head and jaw pain”.

Dr. Johnson, a prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, tells of many patients who report stiffness in the upper back/shoulders first thing in the morning. Others present after some simple dental work and now have TMD symptoms. “Often grinding at night or some malocclusion can contribute to TMD and the person rarely equates the underlying factors to their oral-facial discomfort”.

Your temporomandibular joints stabilize the upper jaw. A malfunctioning of these joints, which are on both sides of your jaw, is the most common reason people suffer from TMJ disorder. One side of the jaw, will work prematurely during different movements. This is caused by sleeping on it awkwardly. Typically it is caused by night teeth grinding.

TMD can be very painful and causes a lot of discomfort. However, oftentimes patients don’t know that their pain is a result of TMD.

Some symptoms of TMD are:

  • Discomfort in the neck, back and shoulder
  • Headache
  • Pain with chewing and swallowing
  • Clicking of the jaw
  • Dizziness
  • Difficulty opening and closing the mouth
  • Ringing in the ears

Once one side of your jaw joint becomes inflamed, the mouth cannot open symmetrically. Additionally, the inflamed joint can cause pain around the ear. Dr. Johnson can offer solutions to patients suffering from TMD.

TMD symptoms are treated with a mouthpiece, also known as a nightguard, to relax the jaw. The mouthpiece rests on the teeth so you cannot grind them and gradually, the mouthpiece helps heal the joint.

Dr. Johnson also educates his patients about how they can relieve TMD symptoms. For more information on TMD, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org and remember, “See a Specialist…The Difference Will Make You Smile”.


YOUR SMILE IS YOUR BEST ACCESSORY

15 March 2013

It is often said that the first thing people notice about you is your shoes. Could be. But in reality, the first thing people notice about you is your smile. Nothing is quite as striking as a beautiful set of white teeth. Not only is a whiter smile more attractive, but it also presents a healthier appearance. And while you may not have been born with it, you can certainly acquire it fairly easily.

While it has never been easier to obtain a radiantly white smile, it is important to do your homework to ensure the option you choose is effective, long lasting and a healthy option for your mouth. There are many products in the marketplace currently claiming to produce teeth-whitening effects, and all have varying degrees of effectiveness. There are plenty of do-it-yourself options available, but none can match the professional whitening services that are offered by a dentist.

Every toothpaste is a basic cleaner and removes mild surface stains, but doesn’t offer much in the way of changing the color of your teeth. It might just be able to keep your teeth their original color. But the natural color of most people’s teeth is impacted by their daily habits. A common remedy and the next step up from regular toothpaste is whitening toothpastes, but, again, these are effective only for surface stains and typically only offer about one tooth-shade improvement. Whiter is always better, but it doesn’t provide a big impact for those who weren’t already born with a nice set of white teeth.

The major difference between at-home products and in-office teeth whitening at a dentist’s office is the strength of the solutions with the at-home solutions being much weaker. The obvious reason for this is that a stronger product would require much more care and attention than a weaker solution, which necessitates a professional be involved. In office whitening solutions are anywhere from five to 15 times as strong. Simply put, a dentist is going to be able to make your teeth whiter, do it quicker and make it last longer.

A dentist offers teeth-whitening methods and options that are not available to the general public and that are safer and more effective. In particular, they are careful to protect your gums from the impacts of bleaching agents. Your gums are very sensitive, and using an improperly fitting mouthpiece like you get from the one-size-fits-all store kits is asking for discomfort. A dentist can build you a custom-made mouthpiece and provide you the home kit to ensure that if you choose an at-home solution, you reduce contact of the solution with your gums.

You get what you pay for. At the top and best end of the scale in effectiveness is the in-office teeth-whitening procedure followed-up by periodic take-home touch-ups.

For more information on in-office teeth whitening, visit, www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com and Remember, ”See a Specialist…The Difference will Make you Smile”.

Leaderpost.com


LOU MERLONI ENDORSES NEWTON WELLESLEY DENTAL PARTNERS

11 March 2013

Lou Merloni, current radio personality and former Major League Baseball with the Red Sox, wants you to know about Dr. Johnson of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. As Mr. Merloni is doing more TV appearances, he wished to improve his smile and he did not want to settle for mediocrity where his dental work was concerned. According to the retired infielder, “I set the bar very high in everything I do and I entrusted Dr. Johnson to do some sophisticated dental work…and couldn’t be happier.” He went on to say that he wanted to see Dr. Johnson, a prosthodontist because, “Prosthodontists have the extra training and clinical expertise to handle challenging cases. They often do aesthetic makeovers and complex CAD/ CAM dentistry and implant reconstructions” . If you seek excellence, visit, www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com.

Here is what Lou Merloni has to say about Dr. Johnson:

“As a locally born and raised retired Red Sox player, I do many public appearances for the radio station (WEEI), on TV and at philanthropic events. I entrusted Dr. Johnson to enrich my smile and couldn’t be happier with the results. Dr. Johnson’s work turned out great. I now know what the hands of an Ivy-League catcher can accomplish. His experience, passion and CAD/DAM expertise enable him to be “at the top of his profession“.


NON-INVASIVE WAYS TO A SEXY SMILE

4 March 2013

Our teeth tend to shift over time, with the end result being spaces, gaps, crookedness and misalignment. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, this can happen a number of ways, through continually sleeping on one side, which can push teeth out of alignment; dental decay, which eats away at enamel and affects how your teeth fit together; or filling a cavity that requires the bite to be reworked. All of this can be fixed.

There are a range of cosmetic dentistry options that can straighten your teeth. Depending on what you need, some can be accomplished the same day, and some require more visits and a little more work. But regardless of how your teeth have aged, you can have a straight and sexy smile if you want one.

Teeth whitening allows your teeth to look whiter and brighter but still natural. Just whitening teeth takes years off your appearance because teeth yellow with age.

Also over time, as a result of gravity, upper lips droop and lower lips fall. This makes for shorter looking teeth on the top and gummy looking teeth on the bottom. Neuromuscular dentistry can be used to give you a non invasive facelift.

Veneers are used to bring the shine and luminescence back to your teeth which dull overtime. Because our teeth become less porous, they lose their shine, veneers bring this back.

For more information on non-invasive ways to that sexy smile, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org and remember to, “See a Specialist…The Difference Will Make You Smile.”


LEANN RIMES SUES HER DENTIST

19 February 2013

LeAnn Rimes is suing her dentist over gum inflammation. She is claiming negligence of her dentist.

LeAnn says her dentist placed 8 faulty crowns that are affecting her singing as well as her daily life. The crowns procedures were done 2 years ago. Recently, she has undergone extensive dental treatments to remove the crowns, including root canals and having multiple teeth pulled. She blames her dental issues for stalling her singing career.

For the right dentist and the right results, contact Dr. Ryne Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. Remember, “See a Specialist…The Difference Will Make You Smile“.

Xfinity Videos


TOOTH CARE TIPS FOR VALENTINE’S DAY

14 February 2013

It’s Valentine’s Day, which most likely means you will have some chocolate or other sweet treats in your future. Be sure to take care of your teeth while you are indulging! Here are some dental tips recommended by Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

To ensure that your teeth remain strong and healthy and to avoid periodontal disease and gingivitis, here are some simple and easy tips:

  1. Brush Twice a Day: Brushing your teeth twice a day is the first step to good oral hygiene. Bacteria in your mouth converts food deposits that collect between teeth into acids. The mixing of these acids and your natural saliva results in plaque which leads to tooth decay and cavities. Plaque development starts immediately after eating. So brushing at least twice a day can minimize plaque accumulation.
  2. Use Fluoride Toothpaste: Since you are brushing anyway, use toothpastes that contains fluoride. Fluoride fights bacteria and helps prevent tooth decay.
  3. Floss Daily: Flossing allows you to remove plaque between your teeth. Between your teeth is the main area where plaque and tooth decay begin. You can counter this by flossing daily.
  4. Visit the Dentist: It is recommended that you visit the dentist at least 2 times a year. Seeing the dentist helps you find and fix cavities, tooth decay or any gum problems as soon as they start, preventing bigger problems later on.
  5. Eat a Diet Rich in Calcium: A healthy diet rich in calcium is one of the most basic tips for healthy and strong teeth. Drinking milk daily ensures healthy, strong, white teeth. Avoiding foods that have high sugar like candy, pretzels and chips is good for your teeth as well.

For more information on dental and oral health, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org and remember, “See a Specialist…The Difference will make you Smile.”


DENTAL ISSUES RELEVANT TO PREGNANCY

6 February 2013

Carrying a precious life is generally considered one of the greatest experiences a woman can have during her lifetime. However, according to Dr. Ryne Johnson, Prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, it also produces challenges that will impact one’s dental health. Understanding the dental implications of a pregnancy can assist in being pro-active and avoiding significant problems after delivery.

Keeping Your Oral Health On Top Of Your Mind

As you already know, your lifestyle and habits during pregnancy can affect your health as well as the health of your unborn baby. With all the things you need to be prepared for, your oral health may not exactly be top-of-mind. But maintaining the healthy teeth and gums is necessary to avoid the risk of developing pregnancy gingivitis and to establish good oral health long-term.

Postpone Dental Care During Your First Trimester

The first trimester of your pregnancy (the first 13 weeks) is the time in which most of the baby’s major organs develop. If you go to the dentist during your first trimester, tell your dentist that you’re pregnant and have only a checkup and routine cleaning. If possible, postpone any major dental work until after the first trimester. However, if you have a dental emergency, don’t wait! Infections in the mouth can be harmful to you and your baby. See your dentist immediately, and make sure that all dental professionals who examine you are aware you’re pregnant.

Know About Your Increased Risk of Gingivitis

During pregnancy, 50 to 70% of all women experience a condition called pregnancy gingivitis. This is why it’s vital to pay more careful attention to your daily brushing and flossing routine to keep plaque under control. Here’s how:

  • Use a rechargeable electric toothbrush. Many remove more plaque than regular manual toothbrushes, and by investing in one, you can begin to take the steps to reduce the amount of plaque in your mouth and help prevent and reverse gingivitis.
  • Brush with an anti-gingivitis toothpaste. Be sure to read packaging carefully to make sure the toothpaste contains gingivitis-fighting ingredients.
  • Floss regularly. Even if gingivitis causes your gums to swell and bleed, but you still need to floss. By flossing daily, you can eliminate more plaque than brushing alone and help reduce your risk of developing pregnancy gingivitis.
  • Rinse with anti-gingivitis mouthwash. Rinsing with an alcohol-free, anti-gingivitis mouthwash is the final step to killing germs and improving your oral hygiene during pregnancy.

Take About 1200mg of Calcium Daily

Your teeth are made of minerals similar to bone, and the calcium you take in aids in bone development in your baby. The right amount of calcium will help keep your bones strong and contribute to the development of strong teeth and bones in your baby.

Learn About the Medications You’re Taking

Some antibiotics and pain medications are okay to take during pregnancy and may be necessary. However, one group of antibiotics, tetracycline and related antibiotics may cause hypoplasia (underdevelopment) of tooth enamel and/or discoloration of the permanent teeth in children. Be sure to tell your doctor you’re pregnant if he or she prescribes this medication for you.

Be Prepared for Morning Sickness

Morning sickness is nausea and vomiting that often occurs during pregnancy. It can happen at any time of day. If you suffer from morning sickness, having your own emergency travel bag is a good plan. In a small, sturdy bag, pack the following:

  • Opaque plastic bags without holes (Plastic grocery bags are a good choice)
  • Wet wipes, tissues or napkins to wipe your face and mouth
  • A small bottle of water to rinse your teeth and mouth
  • A travel-sized mouthwash, toothpaste and toothbrush to brush away stomach acids
  • Breath spray or mints

Deal with Changes in Your Mouth

During pregnancy, you may experience symptoms of dysgeusia (changing tastebuds or a bad taste in your mouth) or ptyalism (too much saliva). To help cope with a bad taste in your mouth:

  • Brush often, and gargle with a mixture of baking soda and water (1/4 teaspoon of baking soda in one cup of water) to help neutralize pH levels
  • Add lemon to water, drink lemonade or suck on citrus drops
  • Use plastic dinnerware and utensils to help decrease metallic taste

To help cope with an increase in saliva, drink plenty of fluid to increase swallowing. Sucking on SUGAR-FREE candies may also offer relief.

Ask a Professional Before Using Fluoride

While many prenatal vitamins contain fluoride, the value of fluoride and fluoride supplementation in pregnant women is unclear, and not everyone agrees on it. Be sure to consult your doctor if you’re curious about it.

Speak with your OB/GYN regarding these issues and for additional information, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org and remember to, “See a specialist…The difference will make you smile”.

Original article produced by Oral B


COMPUTER GUIDED IMPLANT PLACEMENT

28 January 2013

In 1987 computed tomography (CT) was introduced into dentistry which added another dimension to dental implant treatment planning. Prior to this technology, dental diagnosis and treatment planning relied on a two dimensional image which, in some instances, led to a false impression of available bone. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, Prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “This new technology allows clinicians for the first time to evaluate anatomic structures with a higher level of accuracy”.

In 1999 dental implant planning applications were developed, allowing interactive planning of virtual implants in 2-D and 3-D. The use of radiopaque templates/scanning appliances at the time of the CT scan made it possible for the prosthetic outcome to be incorporated into interactive pre-surgical planning. This advancement paved the way for an association between radiographic anatomic interpretation, prosthetic treatment planning, and precise surgical execution. Through the use of stereolithography and CAD/CAM technology, surgical templates can be fabricated, prior to surgery which helps clinicians place implants in a well-planned preoperative/prosthetic manner, rather than a ‘seat of the pants’ intraoperative planning, which is often surgical-driven.

The use of surgical templates can benefit the patient as well as the dental team (restorative dentist, surgical specialist, and laboratory technician). The work performed is generally more accurate and less invasive than in traditional cases. The ability to transfer the desired three-dimensional position of implants from the virtual model to the mouth has made this a more efficient outcome with far fewer risks and better outcomes.

The surgical template essentially has two functions: one for the surgical phase and one for the laboratory phase. It is used as a laboratory template to fabricate a master model, which is used to create the premanufactured implant-supported prosthesis.

To visualize this process, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org for more information. Remember to, “See a specialist…The difference will make you smile”.

ADA


DENTAL IMPLANTS ALL IN ONE DAY

23 January 2013

Many patients who are considering dental implants first need a tooth extracted before the implant is placed. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson – Prosthodontist with offices in Newton and Wellesley Massachusetts, “the dentists at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners are often able to both extract a tooth and place the implant during the same surgery”. Although it may seem like a lot to have done in one day, this option actually saves you time and money. Here’s why:

Money Savings

Often, bone grafting is needed at the extraction sites. But, if an implant can be placed on the day of your extraction, it eliminates the need to come back a second time to have an implant placed, and thereby eliminates the second-visit charge.

All in all, this amounts to a savings of over $400 to you.

Time Savings

After the extraction of a tooth, if bone grafting is done, a three-month healing period is necessary for the bone graft to heal and mature with your jawbone BEFORE an implant can be placed. After the implant placement, there are an additional 3 and a half months before the final restoration can be put in. However, if an implant is placed immediately, the first three-month healing period is completely eliminated. This means that your dentist can put in your final tooth three months sooner, restoring you to your normal state of mouth/aesthetic function.

Healing Savings

Put simply, why would anyone undergo another surgery if they don’t need to? Though dental implant surgery is minor on the scale of invasiveness (many liken its discomfort to that of getting one’s ears pierced), surgery is still surgery, and the body takes its time to recover. Immediate implant placement saves the body from having to heal itself from another surgery. In a nutshell, immediate implant placement cuts recovery and your total “down time” in half.

The Bottom Line

There are many cases that lend themselves to placement of an implant the same day as tooth removal. However there are additional concerns and in 33% of the cases, immediate placement is contra-indicated (due to bone configuration, infection, etc.). Only through proper diagnosis and treatment planning, can a well-informed decision be made.

Visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org for additional information and remember to, “See a specialist…The difference will make you smile”


CAUSES OF BAD BREATH

17 January 2013

Bad Breath is a deal breaker. With such a focus on white teeth and a white smile, more and more people are also concerned or worried about bad breath. No one wants to be with someone who has it, and certainly no one wants it themselves. So how do you guard against bad breath?

The Common Causes of Bad Breath

If you suffer from chronic, severe bad breath, or halitosis, identifying the causes of it so you can determine an effective treatment is important.

The following are all causes of bad breath:

  • Tobacco use. If you smoke, quit. Your bad breath may be due to other causes, too, but tobacco use is a guarantee of bad breath. If you are ready to quit, ask your doctor or dentist for advice and support.
  • What you eat, or don't eat. Certain foods, such as garlic, contribute to bad breath, but only temporarily. Once they are absorbed into the bloodstream, the smell is expelled through the breath, but the odors remain until the body processes the food, so there’s no quick fix.
  • Dry mouth. If your mouth is extremely dry, there is not enough saliva to wash away excess food particles and bacteria, which can cause an unpleasant smell if they build up on the teeth.
  • Infections. Bad breath that seems to have no other cause may indicate an infection elsewhere in the body. If you have chronic bad breath and your dentist rules out any oral problems, see your doctor for an evaluation. Bad breath can be a sign of a range of conditions including respiratory tract infections, chronic sinusitis or bronchitis, diabetes, or liver and kidney problems, so it's important not to ignore the problem.

The best way to improve bad breath is to follow a thorough oral care routine including twice-daily teeth brushing and daily flossing to remove the food particles and bacteria that can cause bad breath. Mouthwashes only improve bad breath for the short term. If you have a chronic problem, Dr Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners can help by deep cleaning your teeth and gums and he may suggest an antimicrobial mouth rinse to help keep bacteria at bay.

For more information, contact Dr. Johnson. And remember, “See a Specialist…the Difference will Make You Smile.“

Oralb.com


NUTRITION PLAYS A ROLE IN MAINTAINING HEALTHY TEETH

10 January 2013

Everyone knows the importance of proper nutrition and a good diet when it comes to maintaining physical health. However, the same level of thinking can also help with our dental health, and having good nutritional and eating habits will contribute to healthy teeth and gums.

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist with Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “A good, balanced diet can help to boost and maintain our body’s natural immune system; this can help to reduce the likelihood of developing oral complaints, while also helping to maintain healthy gums and strong teeth“.

What we eat and drink can have an effect our oral health. Sweets, for instance, can stick to our teeth and leave behind sticky deposits which if not removed can lead to tooth decay. As such, it is important to maintain a good dental health regime to remove sticky residues that may be left behind. Fizzy drinks, such as Pepsi cola, can erode tooth enamel, due to the acidic nature of the beverage.

It’s also important to eat regularly, as research has shown that dental health can be affected by how often a person eats. Regular snacking on sweet or starchy foods can increase the activity of bacteria in a person’s mouth; this leads to heightened levels of acid in the mouth, which can erode tooth enamel. The more frequently a person eats, the more bacteria is stimulated, and the more acid is produced. Saliva plays an important part in maintaining our dental health. Saliva can help to neutralize acid caused by eating, so rather than snacking consider combining foods into a larger meal. Saliva is a naturally occurring liquid in the mouth and can wash away food particles which may also be the target of bacteria, as well as helping to replenish teeth with essential nutrients to help withstand acid attacks.

Eating and drinking sensibly, adopting a good dental hygiene regime and making regular appointments with a dentist can all help to ensure that your smile remains healthy and strong, as well as remaining beautiful.

For more information, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com and remember to, “See a specialist…The difference will make you smile.“

Excerpts – About.com


BETTER SMILE, BETTER TEETH, MORE CONFIDENCE IN 2013

3 January 2013

Resolve to take care of yourself and your smile this New Year. If you have missing or crooked teeth or just an aging smile, it is time to take care of your mouth , your self esteem and your oral health. But don’t just take our word for it. See what others are saying about Newton Wellesley Dental Partners and about Dr. Johnson in particular. From seniors to radio personalities to actresses, some of their testimonials are below. To see more testimonials, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org.

Don’t just see any dentist, see a prosthodontist with advanced training and expertise. Remember, “See a Specialist…The Difference will Make You Smile”.

Lou Merloni – Retired Red Sox player, Radio & TV Personality

“As a locally-born and raised, retired Red Sox player, I do many public appearances for the radio station, on TV and at philanthropic events. I entrusted Dr. Johnson to enrich my smile and couldn’t be happier with the results. Dr. Johnson’s work turned out great! I now know what the hands of an Ivy-League catcher can accomplish. His experience, passion and CAD/CAM expertise enable him to be at the top of his profession”.

Michael Andelman – Radio & TV Personality

“I put off seeing a dentist for over 8 years and had dental issues that required immediate attention. I called Dr. Johnson and he made arrangements to see me at 6:45 the next morning. After having the work done, I can tell you that I’ve never had better customer service in any industry…not anything close! It’s the best experience I’ve ever had”.

Dr. Dawn West – Dentist/Clinical Director at a local Dental School

“When it came time for my mother to address her “tired’ smile, i know more than most that she should see a specialist. As a dentist that serves as a clinical director at a local dental university who treats special needs patients, I recognized that skill set of Dr. Johnson was exactly what my mother needed. I knew of his clinical, teaching background and that he has lectured nationally. He has an outstanding reputation for world-class, dental aesthetics and his ceramist has the talent to create beautiful, yet natural results. The outcome is better than we expected and my mother and I couldn’t be happier. Thank you Dr. Johnson”.

Fr. Harvey Egan – Professor Emeritus at Boston College

“I saw Dr. Johnson for a tooth that had gone ballistic. After he took the time to explain all the available options, I followed his recommendations. I think very highly of him. The way he used his high-tech instrumentation and delicate “touch” indicated to me that he is highly skilled. I wish that I had discovered him sooner. Thanks for the excellent Treatment”.

For more information or to book your appointment, contact us at www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org


RESOLVE TO HAVE BETTER ORAL HEALTH IN 2013

28 December 2012

As we enter the new year with so many good intentions, Dr. Ryne Johnson, Prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners suggests that you add one more resolution to your list … improved oral health! Dentists see firsthand the effects lack of regular dental care can have on the overall health and well-being of so many people. If you want to feel good, stay healthy, and look great throughout your life, you might be surprised what a difference a healthy mouth makes.

Brush your teeth and gums. Floss. Improve your diet. Visit your dentist. These simple behaviors work! As Benjamin Franklin stated — “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

Whether you are 8 or 80, your oral health is very important. If cared for properly, your teeth can last a lifetime. Losing your teeth is not inevitable, as it was for many in previous generations. However, your mouth changes as you age, so being vigilant throughout your lifetime and having regular dental check-ups to detect any early signs of dental disease is critical to maintaining a healthy mouth and healthy body. Some 100 million Americans fail to see a dentist each year, even though regular dental exams, combined with good oral hygiene, can prevent most dental diseases.

Today we know there are associations between oral health and overall health and that physicians are beginning to work more closely with dentists to monitor the health of their patients. Dentists are a critical part of a patient’s healthcare team, in that they are often the first ones to detect changes in a patient’s oral condition that can signify overall health problems. People with diabetes, for instance, have a greater chance of developing gum disease, at a rate three to four times higher than people without diabetes. And, untreated, gum disease can lead to a breakdown of gum tissue and bone that may eventually result in teeth becoming loose or falling out. The good news is that your dentist may detect early stages of gum disease during regular exams and treatments are available to help stop the progression.

Make a resolution today to adopt healthy oral care habits at home and seek regular dental care. You can help your teeth last a lifetime and have a smile you’ll be proud of. For more information, visit NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com and remember to, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile”.

Austin Daily Herald


DENTAL IMPLANTS VS CROWNS: A GROWING OPTION

19 December 2012

“Implants for replacing lost teeth have come a long way since I began my dental practice in 1986”, according to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist with Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. “Better materials, computer diagnostic procedures, CAD/CAM technology and professional experience result in far fewer problems than occurred in the early years of implants”.

Critical to their success, however, is proper selection of both patients and practitioners — and, after the implant, a commitment to good oral hygiene. Dental implants must be treated like natural teeth: kept clean and free of plaque through proper brushing, flossing and periodic professional cleanings.

“Bridges are not the standard of care anymore,” For most people who lose teeth, implants are the treatment of choice” according to Dr. Johnson. “Implants do not decay, and adjacent healthy teeth do not require crowns to support them. And because it is easy to clean and floss between implants, the gum tissue and underlying bone are more likely to remain healthy”.

With a bridge, if one of the supporting crowned teeth breaks or develops decay or nerve damage, the bridge and its three or more crowns must be removed and replaced.

Implants can replace individual lost teeth or many teeth in a row. For those who have lost most of their teeth, implants can be used to anchor a full or partial denture. About half a million implants are placed each year in this country.

On average, the total cost of a dental implant to replace a single tooth is $5,000 to $7,000 (more if other procedures are required), or about one-third more than the cost of a bridge. But while bridges have an average life span of 10 years, an implant can last a lifetime.

Not a Quick Procedure

The basic technique involves surgically inserting a titanium screw — the implant — into the supporting bone, which can be done under local anesthesia in less than an hour, and attaching a small fake tooth called an abutment, followed by a crown. The resulting tooth looks and feels like a natural one.

Although there is an increasing trend toward ‘immediate loading” where computer design is implemented and dentistry is immediately placed on the, the conventional approach can be a lengthy one. Unlike a bridge, which can be completed in a few weeks, implants usually take about eight weeks for the screw to become firmly attached to bone before the final crown can be placed. “A patient’s health, not age, determines suitability for an implant,” Dr. Johnson reports. “I just did implants for a 88-year-old who needed them to support and ill-fitting denture. “If cases are chosen well, implants are very successful — 96 to 97 percent successful. And they rarely fail down the road.”

A most important element is having enough bone in the jaw to support the implant, although in some cases bone cells removed during drilling for the implant or taken from elsewhere in the

In some cases when a tooth must be pulled, an implant can be placed right after the extraction, with the advantage of limiting bone loss in the area. When bone is not being stimulated, it tends to break down. I consider myself lucky that although I’ve had this troublesome bridge for many decades, my underlying bone has remained healthy enough to support an implant.

Choosing a Doctor

Just as any physician can legally perform surgery, any dentist can legally do implants. Be sure to choose someone thoroughly trained in the technique. Taking a weekend course in implantology is rarely adequate. There are risks involved in placing implants, including damage to a nerve or sinus cavity, which are magnified when the practitioner lacks adequate training.

Dental Implants were once done mainly by oral and maxillofacial surgeons, most of whom operated independently of dentists. Now at least as many implants are placed by periodontists who are schooled in the technique and who coordinate their work closely with the patient’s dentist. Ideally, the periodontist should be board-certified.

Just as you might ask for referrals for a prospective attorney or financial planner, consider asking to speak with other patients of the practitioner before deciding to proceed with an implant. Though every case is different, at the least you can determine how well you are likely to be cared for.

For more information visit, www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org and remember to, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile”.


DENTAL VENEERS ARE A VERY POPULAR COSMETIC DENTISTRY PROCEDURE

14 December 2012

Today, dental technology provides better and safer paths oral health care. While many cosmetic dentistry procedures work very well, according to Dr. Ryne Johnson of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “porcelain veneers stand out to be one of the very best”. Dental veneers are fitted over the front of each tooth and are used to hide minor dental damages, yielding a perfect and natural appearing smile. However, the skills and experience of the cosmetic dentist (and laboratory technician) has a huge impact on the outcome and can be the difference between natural radiance and the appearance of mediocre dental work.

The benefits of porcelain veneers are many and they are highly recommended for people searching for a safe and successful smile makeover. Porcelain veneers are among the most wanted services at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners because they maintain the integrity of the underlying tooth, making them safer and more suitable to a natural looking and feeling smile.

Veneers are a thin shell of porcelain that is fitted to teeth to further enhance its shape and shade. They normally cover just the front area of the existing tooth. Veneers can be utilized to close spaces between teeth, extend small or deformed pieces, mask discolored or dark teeth. When teeth are fragmented or begin to wear, veneers can serve as a good protection from damage and later on refurbish their original appearance.

Cosmetic veneers are one of the most popular forms of cosmetic dentistry, as they are natural looking and can be permanently placed within two to three visits.

For more information on dental veneers, contact Dr. Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners or visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org. Remember to, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile”.

Virtual Strategy Magazine


COSMETIC DENTISTRY PROCEDURES

11 December 2012

Some may argue that cosmetic dentistry procedures are expensive, but according to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “what you gain from restorative or cosmetic dental care will pay you back in self-confidence and self-assurance”. Studies have shown that people with attractive smiles are more successful in society and business. Cosmetic dentistry procedures help you in aesthetics, function and health. Don’t forget, you will look younger too.

Cosmetic dentistry procedures:

Braces – are generally used to straighten your teeth. You have options between metal or porcelain brackets and Invisalign clear aligners, depending on your dental situation. The fees for orthodontics will vary depending on a variety of factors: the type of braces you need to wear, your geographic location, the material they are made of and the dental office you choose.

Dental implants – another extremely popular cosmetic dental procedure which helps you enhancing your smile and health. There are many types of dental implants available. Advancements in computer assisted diagnostics and placement now allow for teeth to be worn the same day implants are placed.

Dental veneers – veneers are thin sheets of porcelain placed over the surface of our natural tooth to hide imperfections, badly stained or slightly misaligned teeth. Veneers, if done properly, should appear imperceptible while being very conservative in the amount of tooth that is reduced/removed.

Complete smile makeover – when this type of treatment is needed, a variety of specialists undertake several cosmetic dental procedures to enhance the smile of the patient. The complete smile makeover can involve gum therapy, dental implants, veneers, dental bridges or crowns and even jaw reconstruction surgery.

Teeth whitening – in-office teeth whitening (and take home hits) is done for those who have stained teeth or for those whose teeth has darkened from age. For a whiter, brighter, yet natural smile, teeth whitening is a very popular procedure.

For more information on cosmetic dentistry, visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com. Remember to, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile”.


WHITE WINE CAN STAIN TEETH TOO

29 November 2012

It is the holiday season, and we all want our smile to look its best. We all know that red wine can stain your teeth but switching to white during the holidays might not be a perfect alternative. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “white wine isn’t a ‘stain-free’ option. Even though white wine lacks red pigment, it creates a situation that allows other dark beverages and foods to stain your teeth”.

The problem is acid. The acid in white wine etches the tooth enamel, giving the surface rough spots, pits and grooves that are the perfect places for pigments from other stain-making foods and beverages to seep in.

If you drink a glass of white wine while socializing with friends your teeth are saturated with acid for approximately 30 minutes after you finish that drink. Acid can do a great deal of damage to tooth enamel in that length of time.

But don’t worry, a little planning can help off-set the damage. Increased saliva production can also derail an acid attack. Saliva contains minerals and fluoride; it neutralizes acid and helps heal the tooth surface. Dr. Johnson recommends, “chewing gum made with xylitol or eating non acidic foods which stimulates saliva flow. So, pair that wine with some cheese between sips”.

A little extra planning can help you maintain your white healthy smile for the holidays. If you are already dealing with stains and want to discuss options to correct your smile, visit Dr. Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. He’ll educate you about teeth whitening and the range of products that will keep your teeth their dazzling best. Present a copy of this blog and receive 75%-off tooth whitening procedures (in-office & take home kit).

Remember to, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile”.


A REVOLUTION IN DENTAL IMPLANT THERAPY

21 November 2012

A revolution in Dental Implant Therapy is occurring in the area’s finest practices! According to Dr. Ryne Johnson of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, he is, “transforming lives through computer, surgical and prosthetic symbiosis”. What does this mean and what can Dr. Johnson do for you?

Since the 1980s, Dr. Johnson has been using computer integrated techniques in his dental implants. Many have referred to Dr. Johnson as a pioneer in this area but recent advancements in dental-focused, 3 dimensional CAT-scans and a revolutionary development in implant design now enables the team at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners to pre-design the case on the computer, pre-fabricate the dentistry and place implants with such precision that the prosthesis (teeth) can be put to use the same day that implants are placed.

In the past, an implant was placed and ‘left asleep’ in the bone for 3-6 months (depending on bone density and other variables). Once the bone cells had grown onto the implant, impressions would be made and the dentistry would be fabricated at the lab.

Now, through the integration of 3D, CT-scans, digital impression taking, in the office, and the new surface design of the implants, this can all be done in ONE DAY.

Visit www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com for more information. Look for Dr. Johnson’s ad in Boston Magazine and remember to, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile”.


TMJ DISORDER

16 November 2012

“Temporomandibular joint” or TMJ is actually the hinge joint connecting the lower jaw to the skull’s temporal bone.

The temporal bone is located in front of each ear. The ligaments, muscles and joints on each side of your jaw are attached to the jaw joint. They let you open and close your mouth and allow you to chew, swallow and talk.

It works wonderfully, when it works, but it can be thrown off by a number of problems.

Some disorders of the TMJ are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, grinding teeth, dislocation, misalignment of jaw or teeth, or injury. Stress can cause muscles of the jaw or face to tighten or teeth to clench.

Your face, jaw joint, neck, shoulders, around the ear, or in the ear may be tender or sore when you chew or speak, or when opening your mouth wide.

You may not be able to open your mouth as widely as you could before. Your jaw may get stuck either open or closed.

You may have clicking, grating or popping sounds which may or may not be painful when moving your jaws.

Chewing may be painful or may feel “off”. You may have swelling on one side of the face or the other, or both sides.

Pain from temporomandibular disorders can be temporary for some people or it may last for years. Women are more likely to get TMD than men are. It is most likely to hit between age 20 and 40.

Dr. Johnson can perform an examination in the case of TMD and help you solve your dental problems that cause these aches and pains. Use of a bite plate or a night guard, custom designed by the dentist may lessen teeth grinding and clenching.

If you are suffering from TMD:

It can be helpful to eat softer foods. Don’t bite your nails or chew gum. Pain may be eased by using heat packs. Some people find relief through meditation, biofeedback or other types of relaxation techniques to reduce jaw tension. Also recommended, strengthening your jaw muscles through exercise.

For an appointment contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.

EmpowHer


A GIFT FOR YOURSELF: TEETH WHITENING

9 November 2012

The holidays are right around the corner. Give yourself a gift: teeth whitening. White, healthy looking teeth say a lot about a person. They say you are confident, healthy and young. Yes, whiter teeth make you look and feel younger.

You may not consciously notice your own or someone else’s teeth, but a smile makes a first impression. White teeth and a healthy smile let you feel confident and comfortable.

This holiday season enjoy the holiday photos with healthy white teeth through teeth whitening. And at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners we will make sure your new white smile is a natural smile. No one should look like they have been through a teeth whitening procedure. Natural smiles are better than that fake-looking smile.

At Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, our patients come in for a deep dental bleaching session in order to jump start the whitening process. Our patients then go home with prepared dental bleaching “trays” to supplement the process and do touch-ups in the privacy of their own homes.

For the holidays, give yourself a whiter smile that says “beautiful and confident”. Contact us before December 1st and mention this blog for 50% off our usual fees and remember, “See a Specialist…The Difference Will Make You Smile”.


RESTORE YOUR TEETH FOR A CONFIDENT SMILE

5 November 2012

Does your smile make you uncomfortable? A cosmetic dentist can restore the smiles of people who have teeth that are decayed, damaged or even missing and are finding it embarrassing to smile. Dental implants are a popular smile restoration technique that is used to replace teeth that are lost to provide an attractive new smile. Dental implants provide people with beautiful, bright, natural-looking smiles. An attractive smile gives you new-found confidence in social settings.

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, Prosthodontist and Director at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, dental implants are a safe, effective and permanent way to replace teeth that are missing or badly damaged. A dental implant is a small post made of titanium that is installed into the jawbone. A natural-looking porcelain tooth is then custom-made and held in place by the implant to restore the tooth and provide a new smile makeover. And now, with current computer technology in the hands of experienced specialists, teeth can be placed on the same day as implants.

Dental Implants can be used to correct many problems:

  • Restoring teeth that are badly damaged or decayed;
  • Replacing missing teeth to restore a smile;
  • Replacing infected or loose teeth;
  • A popular alternative to dentures that is permanent.

Dental tooth implants are a permanent solution for restoring your teeth. Dr. Johnson can provide his clients with an attractive new smile that is naturally beautiful. Our patients are amazed at the dramatic transformation in their appearance and they feel more attractive and self-confident.

For more information about the cosmetic dentistry services offered by Newton Wellesley Dental Partners or to schedule your complimentary consultation, contact us. Remember, “See a Specialist…the Difference Will Make You Smile”


PROSTHODONTICS HAVE A ROLE IN COSMETIC DENTISTRY

25 October 2012

Prosthodontics can really help you achieve a straight and beautiful smile so that you can be confident wherever you go and make that incredible first impression. Statistics show that a healthy, bright and white smile is one of the keys to success. A beautiful smile is not only a sign of good health, but it will also raise your self confidence, which means that you will become more productive.

Charles Reade, a 19th century author, quipped, “Beauty is power and its sword is a smile”. Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, who is regarded as a pioneer in CAD/CAM dental ceramics was recently quoted in Boston magazine, “In the sphere of cosmetic dentistry, credentials, experience, and an attention to detail influence the subtle nuances that determine whether one’s smile suggests countless hours in a dental chair or projects the radiance of well-maintained beauty”. In other words, does your dentistry look like dentistry or is it imperceptible?

Prosthodontists specialize in dental implant reconstructions, partial dentures, inlays/onlays, crowns, dental bridges, TMJ therapy & night guards, dental implants and porcelain veneers. Prosthodontists are known for their expertise in offering a wide array of cosmetic dental procedures meant to completely transform your smile.

Other important dental procedures for which prosthodontists receive advanced training include:

  • resolving congenital birth anomalies relating to teeth, the jaw/dental arc & palate
  • resolving snoring & sleeping disorders
  • offering mouth reconstruction in case of oral cancer
  • resolving dental problems related to joint & jaw complications

Of course, many of the procedures above can be performed by a general dentist or a ‘cosmetic’ dentist. However, if you want the best possible treatment many suggest that you should visit a prosthodontist who has advanced training or experience in all these types of dentistry and dental reconstruction techniques. Prosthodontists typically under-take 3 more years of clinical training after the four years required to be a general dentist. This allows them to be more-focused in a narrow scope of care.

If you have concerns regarding any aspect of your smile, if the teeth that are misaligned or missing, and if jaw problems or pain persist, you should research for the best prosthodontist out there to get the highest quality treatment.

For more information, visit, www.Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.com. And remember, “See a Specialist…The Difference Will Make You Smile”.

World Dental


OCTOBER IS NATIONAL DENTAL HYGIENE MONTH

22 October 2012

Each year, dentist offices celebrate National Dental Hygiene Month in October. The event was developed in an effort to spread awareness of healthy oral hygiene and preventative dental services.

According to the National Cancer Institute, more than 20,000 Americans have been diagnosed with oral cancer this year. According to Dr. Ryne Johson, Prosthodontist and Director at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, oral cancer signs can be detected early, which is why visiting a dentist regularly is crucial. Some recommendations on how to follow a simple daily oral health regimen to prevent oral disease include:

  • Brush teeth for two minutes, two or three times daily
  • Floss daily under the gumline and between teeth
  • Rinse with an fluoridated antimicrobial mouthwash daily
  • Chew sugar-free gum after eating
  • Visit a dentist every six months or more frequently if indicated
  • Avoid hazardous chemicals from smoking and tobacco

At Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, we make an effort to assure patients’ have healthy gums and teeth before performing any cosmetic dentistry or reconstructive dentistry procedure. During oral exams we check our patients’ teeth for cavities, bite problems, fractures, pockets of plaque or bacteria, and take X-rays for an in-depth look at the underlying bone. If early signs of oral cancer are detected, we take the necessary steps to assure the patient is referred for additional evaluation/treatment.

For more information or to schedule your appointment, visit NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.com and remember, “See a specialist…the difference will make you smile”.

Dentistry IQ


DO RESEARCH WHEN CHOOSING A COSMETIC DENTIST

12 October 2012

All things considered, dentistry is still somewhat affordable and many dental procedures are covered by insurance. But when it comes to cosmetic dental procedures, coverage varies and the quality of service varies. Spend time on the decision making process. Why let your insurance company determine what is in YOUR best interest? Only you know what is best for you …besides, insurance companies are in the business of making money for their share-holders.

Cosmetic dentistry involves dental treatments that are designed to make your teeth look more beautiful, straight and white, so these treatments are purely cosmetic. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, “for many people, a cosmetic enhancement generally replaces old, tired work. In these instances, insurance will contribute toward the procedures”.

For many, accepting a sub-standard smile is not an option. Studies have shown that people with a beautiful smile make 37% more than those with a ‘bad teeth’. Thus, many people in this challenging economy seek those fantastic dental veneers or other endeavors to create the smile they’ve been looking for.

Because these procedures are more costly, you want to do your homework. Put some effort into researching. Cheap procedures, quick-fixes, or less reputable offices are not worth it when it comes to your smile. Poor work ultimately costs more because it fails quickly, needs to be redone often and generally leads to additional problems/expenses. Take your time and be fully educated in the process before making your decision. Remember, dentistry is a SERVICE not a commodity.

Dr. Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners believes that education is the key, regardless of where you get your cosmetic dentistry done. A dentist’s reputation, experience, passion, credentials, skill set, and lab affiliations are critical! An educated patient, one who knows what the best procedure is for their life and situation, is going to have outstanding dental treatment that works best for their lifestyle and budget.

Newton Wellesley Dental Partners offers top quality cosmetic dentistry and has earned a 25 year reputation as one of the Boston Area’s best. Take a look at our testimonials, and learn from the experience of our patients. Visit us at www.NewtonWellesleyDental Partners.com for more information and remember, “See a Specialist…the Difference will Make You Smile”.


FULL MOUTH RECONSTRUCTION RESULTS IN A MORE YOUTHFUL SMILE

5 October 2012

The muscles and teeth in your mouth and jaw are very complex. Without the proper bite, chewing can become an issue, your teeth can become worn, jaw soreness can result and headaches are often a result. According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, who is recognized as one of Boston’s most trusted and talented prosthodontists, “facial muscles contribute to one’s ability to function and augment the facial aesthetics. With tooth loss we often see TMJ symptoms, a sunken-in look, and the appearance of pre-mature aging”.

There are many procedures that can correct the relationships of the muscle, bone and teeth in your mouth including dental veneers and crowns, dental implants, bridges, and removable dental prosthetics, all of which can take place in a full mouth restoration. Full Mouth Reconstruction is the process of rebuilding and/or restoring many or all of the teeth in your upper and lower jaw.

While full mouth reconstruction sounds intensive, the results are a perfect smile every time. You will end up with a more comfortable bite and less tension in the jaw and neck. If done correctly, by and experienced, passionate prosthodontist, the results should be otherwise imperceptible.

For those who suffer with teeth that are out of alignment, each time your jaw closes, your mouth, jaw and muscles are damaged. A full mouth reconstruction procedure addresses these problems allowing relief from pain, improved function and aesthetics. More importantly one enjoys better oral health. Best of all, you will also benefit from a beautiful, more youthful smile.

If you are wondering if a full mouth reconstruction is right for you, visit Dr. Johnson and the other doctors at www.NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org or call to arrange for your consultation.


FIX THE TOOTH DAMAGE CAUSED BY GRINDING

28 September 2012

Most people are totally unaware that they grind their teeth, either during the day or at night. Some dentists believe that this is an issue for 75% of patients. Beyond causing headaches, TMJ problems and neck aches, grinding can have an aging effect on the smile by wearing the biting edges of the teeth (especially the front), which not only alter their appearance, but interfere with their function, as well.

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, teeth grinding can also affect the look of the face by contributing to facial collapse. The distance between the nose and the chin can decrease, causing deep wrinkles making you look older. Dr. Johnson states, “I have seen countless people over the years that have spent thousands on cosmetic surgery or Botox only to learn that it was their dental issues that were at fault”.

A drastic smile makeover isn’t your only option. Just as with plastic surgery, smaller procedures can give you the smile of your dreams. Slight reshaping of the teeth with cosmetic contouring can improve the appearance of your smile, as can ongoing whitening at home.

To restore the length of your teeth associated with youth, bonding or veneers on the tips of the front teeth is an option too.

For a consultation on how to fix your damaged teeth, contact Dr. Johnson at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners.org. Remember…See a Specialist, the Difference will Make You Smile”.

New Beauty Magazine


FOR A SMILE WORTHY OF A JOB INTERVIEW, SEE A PROSTHODONTIST

20 September 2012

The current economy has created more competition in the marketplace than seen in recent history. Whether you are trying to maintain your competitive edge or if you are one of those in the workforce looking for a new position, first impressions are critical.

Your smile is a fundamental aspect of your interview; more than your wardrobe, more than your accessories, more than your handshake. The quality of one’s smile often sends a message of success.

Some people are lucky and they have great smiles. Others are predisposed to teeth that are easily broken, damaged or stained. Sometimes genes and lifestyles can cause these problems but often an ugly smile just ‘happens over time’. Stained teeth, dark fillings, missing teeth or bad dentistry can be unsightly. Cosmetic dental procedures can create the white, natural smile that you’ll need to make the right first impression.

According to Dr. Ryne Johnson, prosthodontist and director of Newton Wellesley Dental Partners, who is regarded as one of the Boston Area’s most trusted and respected dentists, cosmetic dentistry can be an easy way improve your image. Cosmetic dentistry includes procedures like dental veneers, ceramic fillings, full mouth reconstruction, teeth whitening and dental implants.

“Quality dentistry should project naturally-radiant beauty and should NOT look like dentistry”, says Dr. Johnson. “Many accept less-than ideal work because they don’t realize what can be done in the hands of a talented prosthodontist”.

For information or a consultation on how Dr. Johnson and his team at Newton Wellesley Dental Partners can improve your smile, visit NewtonWellesleyDentalPartners.org and remember, “See a Specialist, the Difference will make you Smile”.


TEETH WHITENING OPTIONS

13 September 2012

Teeth whitening is the most common cosmetic dentistry procedure performed today. As Americans we are obsessed with white teeth. There are several options available to you for teeth whitening, and it is important that you educate yourself on your options.

There are a number of bleaching products:

Teeth whitening toothpastes – approved toothpaste can help lighten your teeth. They do not bleach the teeth. They are aimed at removing surface staining. Hence they are comparatively less effective than other bleaching methods. Therefore, it takes a lot of time for these toothpastes to show results. Opt for this method if you have a lot of patience.

Over the counter whitening strips – not effective for all patients or all teeth. These strips only whiten the front of the tooth rather than the entire tooth. This makes the process less effective and it does not last as long. Also, whitening strips do not work on implants, crowns or dentures. You may also find various kits in the stores as well which are not dentist approved.

In office dental bleaching – this process from Newton Wellesley Dental Partners gives patients a jump start on their quest for whiter teeth. You start with an in office visit and then continue the at home component. Dr Johnson’s in house visit jump starts the process with a chemical bleaching session. He then sends you home with several “trays” so you can do the less concentrated touch ups in the privacy of your own home without having to make several trips to the dentist

To find out if teeth whitening is the perfect solution for you, contact Newton Wellesley Dental Partners. Remember “See a Specialist, the Difference will Make You Smile”.


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